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-Scott-

Philo and Machiventa

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I was just reading some quotes by Philo and something just caught my eye. The authors of the u.b indicate that Philo had a real clear concept of the Thought Adjuster and that he was one of the greatest teachers of truth. I wonder if Philo was attempting to through poetry trying to take the story of Melkezedeck and Abraham and infuse the concept of the thought Adjuster in there. Sort of like how Jesus would take a concept in peoples mind or a familiar story and use it as a metaphor for god. I wonder if Philo used this story to expand on the nature of the Thought adjuster. An example would be the story of Cain and Abel to examplify good and bad, what if Philo was using a real story and real figure to try and expand on the nature of the adjuster.

 

 

Quote: Philo:

But the king in the first place resorts to persuasion rather than decrees, and in the next place issues directions such as to enable a vessel, the living being I mean, to make life’s journey successfully, piloted by the good pilot, who is right principle."

 

In this quote he is making a connection between the "King" Melkezedeck and the "pilot" who is obviously the adjuster. I wonder if he was trying to take a story of Melkezedeck and try and be creative and add the thought adjuster in it.

 

Obviously people use historical stories and add their own flavour on it to make a unique point. I wonder if he was just trying to be poetic here and use real people to illustrate the nature of the thought adjuster.

 

Here is that line in the context of the whole paragraph...

 

 

Quote:Philo:

79 Melchizedek, too, has God made both king of peace, for that is the meaning of “Salem,” and His own priest. He has not fashioned beforehand any deed of his, but produces him to begin with as such a king, peaceable and worthy of His own priesthood. For he is entitled “the righteous king,” and a “king” is a thing at enmity with a despot, the one being the author of laws, the other of lawlessness. 80 So mind, the despot, decrees for both soul and body harsh and hurtful decrees working grievous woes, conduct, I mean, such as wickedness prompts, and free indulgence of the passions. But the king in the first place resorts to persuasion rather than decrees, and in the next place issues directions such as to enable a vessel, the living being I mean, to make life’s journey successfully, piloted by the good pilot, who is right principle. 81 Let the despot’s title therefore be ruler of war, the king’s prince of peace, of Salem, and let him offer to the soul food full of joy and gladness; for he brings bread and wine, things which the Ammonites and Moabites refused to supply … 82 But let Melchizedek instead of water offer wine, and give to souls strong drink, that they may be seized by a divine intoxication, more sober than sobriety itself. For he is a priest, even Reason, having as his portion Him that is, and all his thoughts of God are high and vast and sublime: for he is priest of the Most High… [Loeb]"

 

Another indication that Philo may have been using this story in a poetic way to try and explain the adjuster is the second sentence I highlighted. It doesn't make sense that Melchizedek would offer our souls anything. Yet if he was using this story as a poetic story to illustrate the adjuster it would fit perfectly....

 

 

Quote:

... 111:1.9 Mind is your ship, the Adjuster is your pilot, the human will is captain

 

Quote:

1338.7) 121:6.4 Philo was a great teacher; not since Moses had there lived a man who exerted such a profound influence on the ethical and religious thought of the Occidental world. In the matter of the combination of the better elements in contemporaneous systems of ethical and religious teachings, there have been seven outstanding human teachers: Sethard, Moses, Zoroaster, Lao-tse, Buddha, Philo, and Paul.

 

 

Quote:

121.6.5 .....In only one matter did Paul fail to keep pace with Philo or to transcend the teachings of this wealthy and educated Jew of Alexandria, and that was the doctrine of the atonement; Philo taught deliverance from the doctrine of forgiveness only by the shedding of blood. He also possibly glimpsed the reality and presence of the Thought Adjusters more clearly than did Paul

 

Amazing to think that Philo glimpsed the reality of the thought adjuster more clearly than Paul who had Jesus there for a while to teach him about the reality of the thought adjuster lol. It's interesting that he "glimpsed" the presence of the thought adjuster as well. That implies some serious insight on his behalf.

Edited by -Scott-
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I just use google alot Rick :) hahah, its amazing what you can find on that search engine Melchizedek is mentioned by Philo, the first-century Jewish philosopher of Alexandria, in three writings (Legum Allegoriae 3.79-82; De Congressu 89; De Abrahamo 235). If you google this you will probably see my other post in the truthbook forum :lol:

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I just found a website with all of Philos writings :lol: . http://www.earlychri...ings.com/yonge/ Here is a more complete version of that paragraph.

 

XXV. (79) Moreover, God made Melchisedek, the king of peace, that is of Salem, for that is the interpretation of this name, "his own high Priest,"{36}{#ge 14:18.} without having previously mentioned any particular action of his, but merely because he had made him a king, and a lover of peace, and especially worthy of his priesthood. For he is called a just king, and a king is the opposite of a tyrant, because the one is the interpreter of law, and the other of lawlessness. (80) Therefore the tyrannical mind imposes violent and mischievous commands on both soul and body, and such as have a tendency to cause violent suffering, being commands to act according to vice, and to indulge the passions with enjoyment. But the other, the kingly mind, in the first place, does not command, but rather persuades, since it gives recommendations of such a character, that if guided by them, life, like a vessel, will enjoy a fair voyage through life, being directed in its course by a good governor and pilot; and this good pilot is right reason. (81) We may therefore call the tyrannical mind the ruler of war, and the kingly mind the guide to peace, that is Salem. And this kingly mind shall bring forth food full of cheerfulness and joy; for "he brought forth bread and wine," which the Ammonites and Moabites were not willing to give to the beholder, that is Israel; by reason of such unwillingness they are shut out from the companionship and assembly of God. For the Ammonites being they who are sprung from the outward sense of the mother, and the Moabites, who originate in the mind of the father, are two different dispositions, which look upon the mind and the outward sense as the efficient causes of all existing things, but take no notice of God. Therefore "they shall not come," says Moses, "into the assembly of the Lord, because they did not come to meet you with bread and water when you came out of Egypt,"{37}{#de 23:4.} that is, out of the passions.

XXVI. (82) But Melchisedek shall bring forward wine instead of water, and shall give your souls to drink, and shall cheer them with unmixed wine, in order that they may be wholly occupied with a divine intoxication, more sober than sobriety itself. For reason is a priest, having, as its inheritance the true God, and entertaining lofty and sublime and magnificent ideas about him, "for he is the priest of the most high God."{38}{#ge 14:18.} Not that there is any other God who is not the most high; for God being one, is in the heaven above, and in the earth beneath, and there is no other besides Him."{39}{#de 4:39.} But he sets in motion the notion of the Most High, from his conceiving of God not in a low and grovelling spirit, but in one of exceeding greatness, and exceeding sublimity, apart from any conceptions of matter

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I just found a website with all of Philos writings :lol: . http://www.earlychri...ings.com/yonge/

 

 

Thanks, what a deep thinker! One has to ask, who were his students? They must have been post-graduates!!

 

And maybe the revelators picked up on his pilot metaphor....anyway I like his first sentence too, beginning his talk about Moses' version of creation:

 

...Of other lawgivers, some have set forth what they considered to be just and reasonable, in a naked and unadorned manner, while others, investing their ideas with an abundance of amplification, have sought to bewilder the people, by burying the truth under a heap of fabulous inventions.

 

Source/more: http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/yonge/book1.html

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In the study session on tuesday Chris.H mentioned that he may have been a 1st circler and that some of his writings may have been discussions between him and his adjuster. He even said that the revelators may have taken the term "thought adjuster" from some of his writings. Indeed the "piloted by the good pilot" seems to indicate he was aware of the adjuster in some way though. Thanks for the link Rick!

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