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#1 HSTa

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 09:34 AM

The hunt is on :

http://arxiv.org/abs/1004.4584v1

Persistent Evidence of a Jovian Mass Solar Companion in the Oort Cloud
Authors: John J. Matese, Daniel P. Whitmire

Abstract: We present an updated dynamical and statistical analysis of outer Oort cloud cometary evidence suggesting the sun has a wide-binary Jovian mass companion. The results support a conjecture that there exists a companion of mass ~ 1-4 M_Jup orbiting in the innermost region of the outer Oort cloud.

http://arxiv.org/PS_...1004.4584v1.pdf


recent:

Sunday, 13 February 2011
If you grew up thinking there were nine planets and were shocked when Pluto was demoted five years ago, get ready for another surprise. There may be nine after all, and Jupiter may not be the largest.


The hunt is on for a gas giant up to four times the mass of Jupiter thought to be lurking in the outer Oort Cloud, the most remote region of the solar system. The orbit of Tyche (pronounced ty-kee), would be 15,000 times farther from the Sun than the Earth's, and 375 times farther than Pluto's, which is why it hasn't been seen so far.

Related articles
•More details about the planet Tyche
Search the news archive for more stories

But scientists now believe the proof of its existence has already been gathered by a Nasa space telescope, Wise, and is just waiting to be analysed.

The first tranche of data is to be released in April, and astrophysicists John Matese and Daniel Whitmire from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette think it will reveal Tyche within two years. "If it does, John and I will be doing cartwheels," Professor Whitmire said. "And that's not easy at our age."

Once Tyche has been located, other telescopes could be pointed at it to confirm the discovery.

Whether it would become the new ninth planet would be decided by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The main argument against is that Tyche probably formed around another star and was later captured by the Sun's gravitational field. The IAU may choose to create a whole new category for Tyche, Professor Matese said.

http://www.independe...et-2213119.html



#2 Coop

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 09:52 PM

HI HSTa :D

FASCINATING

1st I Want toThank you for All the Interesting Stuff that you share here ,
I Really enjoy it and allways learn something new , Albeit some of
the more technical stuff is a bit over my head sometimes , yet I find i learn
something new from it allways .

Thanks for the Links , I also started reading about this New Discovery early
this morning . It had my mind wander to a Question that I Have had for many years
yet never askd about .
The Question Is This ;
DO You , or others Think that someday we will find A Architectual Sphere/s ?
Will We , Could We Even Be Able to Detect them , with [WISE]
Or by other ways an means ?
IS It Possible ?

Scince they are a composite of Material and Morontial Material .
IS Morontial Material Able to even be detected by Mortal finite Methods ?

Or would they maybe hidden by Dark Matter ...

What Will Scientists and Astronomers Say , think about
such a Discovery , eh .

I Sincerly look forward to any opinions , comments , replies .

With Brotherly Love
Faith son
Coop

Architectual Spheres
http://urantiabook.o...b/ppr015_7.html

Edited by Coop, 15 February 2011 - 10:05 PM.


#3 JR Sherrod

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 02:04 AM

Hey Coop & HSTa!

I think we may ALREADY have found a cluster of Architectual Spheres - TEN YEARS AGO!

Check out this story from 2001 on the CNN site. Using gravitational microlensing, the Hubble Space Telescope was able to detect a cluster of planets, which are not bound to a star! 6 planets, about 80 times the mass of Earth.

Hmmm... Jerusem = 100 times Urantia size; 7 Transitional Culture Spheres = 10 times Urantia size; 49 Transition Satallites = Size of Urantia, each. Sounds very much like a cluster of Architectual Spheres to me.

(520.4) 46:1.8 Jerusem receives faint light from several near-by suns — a sort of brilliant starlight — but it is not dependent on them; worlds like Jerusem are not subject to the vicissitudes of sun disturbances, neither are they confronted with the problem of a cooling or dying sun.

CNN called them puzzling pariah "planets."

http://archives.cnn.com/2001/TECH/space/06/27/hubble.cluster/index.html

Maybe this is our first clue to the location of Jerusem... ?

"JR" Sherrod

Edited by JR Sherrod, 16 February 2011 - 02:05 AM.

Ah! To be host to God, Himself; and to be enriched beyond measure by that incomprehensible treasure!

#4 Coop

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Posted 16 February 2011 - 10:09 AM

HI Brother JR :D

Thanks for the heads Up!
Maybe a Clue Maybe Not , Dont know ,
but for some reason I Dont think it is .
Yet i guess it could be .

Hubble spies puzzling pariah 'planets'
June 27, 2001 Posted: 2:02 PM EDT (1802 GMT)

Planet-sized objects could be wandering through globular cluster M22.

(CNN) -- Astronomers have spotted what could be a small population of objects the size of planets, wandering through the galaxy without the gravitational fetters of parent stars.

Using the Hubble Space Telescope, the scientists detected what could be six bodies, perhaps only 80 times the mass of Earth, which would make them the smallest celestial objects ever seen outside the orbit of a star.

The international researchers, who used the magnifying effects of background stars to calculate the size of the objects, cautioned that the preliminary observations needed confirmation.

But the scientific team was enthusiastic about using the experimental method, which takes advantage of a natural phenomenon known as microlensing, to search for diminutive objects in the universe.

"Hubble's sharpness allowed us to make this remarkable new type of observation, successfully demonstrating our ability to see very small objects," said Hubble scientist Kailash Sahu, lead author of a report this week in the journal Nature.

"This holds tremendous potential for further searches for dark, low-mass objects," Kailash said in a statement.

Microlensing takes place when a background star briefly brightens as a foreground object drifts in front of it; the gravity of the closer body amplifies the light of the distant star.

Astronomers can estimate the mass of the closer objects, depending on the duration and strength of the magnification.

These particular bodies, which are far too dim to be observed directly, were detected when they passed in front of stars in the massive central bulge of the Milky Way. Some are thought to be no larger than one quarter the mass of Jupiter.

If the wandering objects turn out as small as billed, what would they be? Orphan planets gravitationally ripped away from parent stars?

There may be too many for that explanation. Astronomers estimate that such bodies comprise as much as 10 percent of the mass of the small star cluster in which they reside, known as M22, which is about 8,500 light years away.

Microlensing has been used before to hunt for low-mass bodies in the disk and halo of our galaxy. But the extraordinary vision of Hubble was needed to attempt such a search mission in the small globular cluster.

In a normal lensing event, a background star brightens and dims for a length of time depending on the mass of the lensing body. The short, "spurious" events seen by the team are shorter than the interval between the Hubble observations, leading to an upper estimate for the mass of an object of one quarter Jupiter's mass.

To double-check the findings, Sahu and colleagues plan to observe the heart of the globular cluster continuously over a period of seven days. They expect to detect enough short-duration microlensing events to measure more accurately the masses of the small bodies.

If confirmed, the diminutive wanderers could provide unexpected insights into the formation of planets and stars, the astronomers said.

Edited by Coop, 16 February 2011 - 10:10 AM.


#5 Coop

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 10:02 AM

'' IF '' :D

Planet probe spots hot prospects
NASA / JPL

By Alan Boyle

It's just one data point among the 1,235 potential worlds identified by NASA's Kepler planet-hunting probe, but you can't help noticing it on a graph. The planetary candidate known as KOI 326.01 sticks out as the one object that's estimated to be the size of Earth or smaller, with an average temperature that's lower than water's boiling point.

If scientists confirm that what they're seeing actually exists, KOI 326.01 could go down as the closest analog to our own planet in the current crop of Kepler data. But that's a big if.

"It's a small object, a small candidate," William Borucki, a planetary scientist from NASA's Ames Research Center who heads Kepler's science team, said today during a news briefing at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting in Washington. Astronomers don't even know the size of its parent star with sufficient precision, Borucki said.

http://cosmiclog.msn...s-hot-prospects

Edited by Coop, 20 February 2011 - 10:08 AM.


#6 Coop

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 10:21 AM

The Goldilocks Zone :D

Cosmic census finds crowd of planets in our galaxy

Cosmologists say new calculations lead to questions about life elsewhere
updated 2/19/2011 8:59:22 PM ET 2011-02-20T01:59:22

- WASHINGTON — Scientists have estimated the first cosmic census of planets in our galaxy and the numbers are astronomical: at least 50 billion planets in the Milky Way.

At least 500 million of those planets are in the not-too-hot, not-too-cold zone where life could exist. The numbers were extrapolated from the early results of NASA's planet-hunting Kepler telescope.

Kepler science chief William Borucki says scientists took the number of planets they found in the first year of searching a small part of the night sky and then made an estimate on how likely stars are to have planets. Kepler spots planets as they pass between Earth and the star it orbits.

So far Kepler has found 1,235 candidate planets, with 54 in the Goldilocks zone, where life could possibly exist. Kepler's main mission is not to examine individual worlds, but give astronomers a sense of how many planets, especially potentially habitable ones, there are likely to be in our galaxy. They would use the one-four-hundredth of the night sky that Kepler is looking at and extrapolate from there.

http://www.msnbc.msn..._science-space/

Shocking star
The blue star near the center of this image, released on Jan. 24, is called Zeta Ophiuchi. When seen in visible light, it looks like a relatively dim red star, surrounded by other dim stars with no dust to be seen. However, in this infrared image taken by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, a completely different view emerges. Zeta Ophiuchi is actually a very massive, hot, bright blue star plowing its way through a large cloud of interstellar dust and gas. The star's motion through the cloud creates the yellowish "bow shock," which is analogous to the wave created by the bow of a boat as it plows through water. (NASA via AP)
Posted Image

Edited by Coop, 20 February 2011 - 10:45 AM.


#7 HSTa

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Posted 20 February 2011 - 12:10 PM

Interesting discussion, but my intent was more to discuss new findings in our own solar system!

I cant see any possibilities to detect small and cool architectural planets that are not close to any kind of a natural star. Even the radio communications from architectural spheres cant be detected, because the transmitter power is so low that " relay energy transmitters" are used for interstellar communications.

UB (539.4) 47:10.2 John the Revelator saw a vision of ...
(Perfected space communication is to be had on all these worlds; and your anywhere reception of such communications is made possible by carrying the "harp of God," a morontia contrivance compensating for the inability to directly adjust the immature morontia sensory mechanism to the reception of space communications.)

UB (522.4) 46:3.4 The Jerusem sending station is located at the opposite pole of the sphere. All broadcasts to the individual worlds are relayed from the system capitals except...


We will all learn more about these architectural spheres in due time, I believe.

Now, that the Finnish international company NOKIA is going to make Windows based mobile phones in cooperation with Microsoft, the new mobile phones will begin to resemble these "harps of God" even more.

Nokia Head Office in Espoo, Finland:

Posted Image


= = =

What we already have detected, are unseen neutron star (pulsars) with planets:

1992 - First planetary system beyond our own Solar System detected, around the pulsar PSR B1257+12

Another John was mentioned in my first mail:

HSTa wrote:
But scientists now believe the proof of its existence has already been gathered by a Nasa space telescope, Wise, and is just waiting to be analysed.

The first tranche of data is to be released in April, and astrophysicists John Matese and Daniel Whitmire from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette think it will reveal Tyche within two years. "If it does, John and I will be doing cartwheels," Professor Whitmire said. "And that's not easy at our age."

Once Tyche has been located, other telescopes could be pointed at it to confirm the discovery.

Whether it would become the new ninth planet would be decided by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The main argument against is that Tyche probably formed around another star and was later captured by the Sun's gravitational field. The IAU may choose to create a whole new category for Tyche, Professor Matese said.

http://www.independe...et-2213119.html


Probably the minor planet SEDNA will be included in the "whole new category" of objects that according to the UB: "... permanently detach these three tributaries of the celestial wanderer."


UB (657.2) 57:5.13 While Angona was unable to capture any of the solar mass, your sun did add to its metamorphosing planetary family some of the circulating space material of the visiting system. Due to the intense gravity field of Angona, its tributary planetary family pursued orbits of considerable distance from the dark giant; and shortly after the extrusion of the solar system ancestral mass and while Angona was yet in the vicinity of the sun, three of the major planets of the Angona system swung so near to the massive solar system ancestor that its gravitational pull, augmented by that of the sun, was sufficient to overbalance the gravity grasp of Angona and to permanently detach these three tributaries of the celestial wanderer. (UB (655.9 )57:5.4... 4,500,000,000 years ago...)


Finding "planets" originating from a visiting charged neutron star in our own solar system;
THIS is really big news, but is probably coming soon!


Timeline of solar system astronomy

http://en.wikipedia....ystem_astronomy

1988 - Martin Duncan, Thomas Quinn, and Scott Tremaine demonstrate that short-period comets come primarily from the Kuiper Belt and not the Oort cloud
1989 - Voyager 2 provides the first ever detailed images of Neptune, its moons and rings.
1990 - The Hubble Space Telescope is launched
1990 - Voyager 1 is turned around to take the Portrait of the Planets of our Solar System, source of the Pale Blue Dot image of the Earth
1991 - The Magellan spacecraft maps the surface of Venus for the first time.
1992 - First planetary system beyond our own Solar System detected, around the pulsar PSR B1257+12
1992 - David Jewitt and Jane Luu of the University of Hawaii discover (15760) 1992 QB1, the first object deemed to be a member of the Kuiper belt
1995 - The first planet around a Sun-like star is discovered, in orbit around the star 51 Pegasi.
1995 - The Galileo spacecraft becomes the first to orbit Jupiter. Its atmospheric entry probe provides the first data taken within the planet itself.
2000 - NEAR Shoemaker provides the first detailed images of a near-Earth asteroid.
[edit] 2001-Present
2004 - Voyager 1 sends back the first data ever obtained from within the Solar System's heliosheath
2004 - Sedna, a large object with an unprecedented 12,000 year orbit, is discovered by Michael E. Brown, Chad Trujillo, and David L. Rabinowitz.
2004 - The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft becomes the first to orbit Saturn. It discovers complex motions in the rings, several new small moons and cryovolcanism on the moon Enceladus and provides the first images from the surface of Titan
2005 - Michael E. Brown et al. discover Eris, a Trans-Neptunian object larger than Pluto, and later also its moon, Dysnomia. Eris was first imaged in 2003, and is the largest object discovered in the Solar System since Neptune's moon Triton in 1846.
2005 - The Mars Exploration Rovers perform the first astronomical observations ever taken from the surface of another planet, imaging an eclipse by Mars's moon Phobos.
2009 - Water discovered on Earth's Moon. [citation needed]


Edited by HSTa, 20 February 2011 - 01:21 PM.


#8 -Scott-

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 01:49 AM

Kuiper cliff" "taken from wikepedia"
Graph showing the numbers of KBOs for a given distance from the Sun. The plutinos are the "spike" at 40 AU, while the classicals are between 42 and 47 AU, and the twotinos are at 48 AU.The 1:2 resonance appears to be an edge beyond which few objects are known. It is not clear whether it is actually the outer edge of the classical belt or just the beginning of a broad gap. Objects have been detected at the 2:5 resonance at roughly 55 AU, well outside the classical belt; however, predictions of a large number of bodies in classical orbits between these resonances have not been verified through observation.[52]

Earlier models of the Kuiper belt had suggested that the number of large objects would increase by a factor of two beyond 50 AU,[56] so this sudden drastic falloff, known as the "Kuiper cliff", was completely unexpected, and its cause, to date, is unknown. Bernstein and Trilling et al. have found evidence that the rapid decline in objects of 100 km or more in radius beyond 50 AU is real, and not due to observational bias. Possible explanations include that material at that distance is too scarce or too scattered to accrete into large objects, or that subsequent processes removed or destroyed those which did form.[57] Patryk Lykawka of Kobe University has claimed that the gravitational attraction of an unseen large planetary object, perhaps the size of Earth or Mars, might be responsible


Could this Shepard planet be the non-breather world?
Just like the one that is used to make Uranus' rings well defined.

Also would the shelter's used to shunt meteor's on the non-breather world possibly be used to absord sunlight for energy thus making it invisible because its would not be reflecting any light? Because it would seem as though a planet this size should be easily discernable. Another interesting note is that between ceres and pluto the kuiper cliff would be in the mid range, so the spacing would be perfect for a planet.

Also the u.b say's we have 12 planets and by alot of accounts only 11 have been pointed out so far. *pluto included. Could a large planet be so close to us yet invisible both because of its light absorbing shelter's and because we are a planet in isolation from its neighbouring worlds?. Perhaps but it seems as though with the urantia book we are being given the green light to explore this world, and perhaps we have had some knowledge of this world in the past with the Nodite's who would have definitely have known of this world. Also when we lost some of our midwayer's is it possible that some midwayers came from this neighboring world thus contributing to legends about aliens etc. The ancient sumerian Seal which shows 12 planets is interesting and also how it is pointing to the furthest planet from the bunch. Could this be a pointer to the non-breather world layed out by nodite knowledge?

Edited by boomshuka, 09 September 2011 - 01:54 AM.

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#9 -Scott-

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 02:10 AM

Also this tablet show's 12 planets and what is very interesting to me etleast is that the furthest planet from the 11 seem's to be of most interest to the people in the tablet.

http://the2012deception.net/?p=9



*Egnore the stitchen and all that other new-age stuff hahaha.

Edited by boomshuka, 09 September 2011 - 02:11 AM.

If one man craves freedom -- liberty -- he must remember that all other men long for the same freedom

#10 Alina

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 01:17 PM

The Kepler mission discovered the first Earth-like planet orbiting a binary system.

The binary star is much more common than we expected out there. In fact provides stability and even
a generation capacity of long-term viable environments. This is the conclusion of the experts of the Kepler mission, which on this occasion, expressed the discovery of the first exoplanet candidate to be like Earth in a binary system, with 4900 years/ Light of the Earth, in the constellation Cygnus. Kepler 47-C orbits at a distance of about 303 days, which puts it in the habitable zone, so that water can exist.
The discovery is so recent, that would imply a clear reconstruction of the models to date have been realizing as classics.

Posted Image

Future days will give us further details about the mission, the contribution to knowledge and additional planets are discovered.

You can see an animation of the system: http://www.nasa.gov/...ia_id=151299651




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