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#1 Bonita

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Posted 04 July 2010 - 12:06 PM

Over the past 5 years or so I've been studying Jewish history with particular emphasis on the few centuries around the time of Jesus. Very frequently I discover passages in texts which confirm what I have read in the Urantia Papers. I'd like to use this thread to post them as I come across them, hoping that others besides me are interested. (Though I tend to doubt it. It's not a popular subject.)

Haven't you wondered what life was like during those messianic times? I've wondered why God chose that time for a bestowal over times like today. The more I read, the more I realize that a lot had to do with the religion, culture and society of the time; and, sometimes I think with the simplicity as well.

These are the texts I'm currently reading and from which I will quote:

The New Testament Era, Bo Reicke (Fortress Press, Philadelphia, 1974)
Why The Jews Rejected Jesus, David Klinghoffer (Doubleday, NY, 2005)
Josephus, The Essential Works, Paul L. Maier (Kregel Publications, Grand Rapids, 1994)

Here is one quote from TUB for which I found corroboration in those texts:

139.0.2 Many of these Galilean fishermen carried heavy strains of gentile blood as a result of the forcible conversion of the gentile population of Galilee one hundred years previously.



The following quote describes how Aristobulus I, who reigned 104-103 BC, defeated the Itureans, annexed Galilee to Judea and forced the gentile Aramaic inhabitants to submit to Jewish law. A similar report appears in Josephus (Ant.xiii,318)

The most important event of Aristobulus' reign for religious history was his conquest of Galilee, which he judaized by compelling the people to be circumcised. (Reicke, pg.68)


Other UB quotes explain the difficulty the religious leaders from Jerusalem in Judea had judaizing the gentiles in Galilee:

121.2.12  The Galileans were not regarded with full favor by the Jerusalem religious leaders and rabbinical teachers. Galilee was more gentile than Jewish when Jesus was born.

123.5.7  Nazareth was a caravan way station and crossroads of travel and largely gentile in population; at the same time it was widely known as a center of liberal interpretation of Jewish traditional law. In Galilee the Jews mingled more freely with the gentiles than was their practice in Judea. And of all the cities of Galilee, the Jews of Nazareth were most liberal in their interpretation of the social restrictions based on the fears of contamination as a result of contact with the gentiles. And these conditions gave rise to the common saying in Jerusalem, “Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?”

123.5.12  Nazareth was one of the twenty-four priest centers of the Hebrew nation. But the Galilean priesthood was more liberal in the interpretation of the traditional laws than were the Judean scribes and rabbis. And at Nazareth they were also more liberal regarding the observance of the Sabbath.



None of the Jewish high priests or Hasmonean princes had hitherto been able to exert much influence upon Galilee. . . . The judaizing of the Galileans, begun by Aristobulus, made constant progress, thanks to resettlement, the activity of the Pharisees, and the building of synagogues . . . (Reicke, pg.69)

Jesus' fellow Galileans, the first to hear his message, were famous for being on average less knowledgeable about the Torah than their fellows to the south in Judea. Given the geographic distance from the center of learning, the holy city, this is not surprising. Viewed as rustics, they were recognizable by a countrified way of pronouncing their Aramaic. The better-informed Jews assumed that Galileans would be unfamiliar with the fine points of Jewish religious observance. Rabbinic literature even hints at a strain of hostility to tradition in the Galilee. (Klinghoffer, pg.43)



#2 Midsoniter woman

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 12:40 PM

It looks like Michael chose Urantia before Gabriel came out to study the human groups on the planet at that time. So the century may have nothing to do with anything except that it was time for Michael's seventh bestowal, nothing more. However, if there is a reason for Jesus choosing to be born in that particular century of Jewish history then I believe the reason is the ideal home life of the Jews of that day.

There's a quote I can't find that says something about the Jewish home life of that day and generation was ideal and at no other time in history has there been a more ideal family life. I know the quote is there somewhere. But I did find this quote.

"Although woman enjoyed more freedom throughout the Roman Empire than in her restricted position in Palestine, the family devotion and natural affection of the Jews far transcended that of the gentile world (1335)."

Another reason for selecting the Jews of that day could be the semi-undiluted ancestry. Mary, a blonde Jew, was directly descended from Eve and Ratta. Joseph was descended from Abraham and the Nodites. The longer Jesus waited, the more diluted the ancestry might become.
"If woman aspires literally to enjoy all of man's rights, then sooner or later, pitiless and emotionless competition will certainly replace that chivalry and special consideration which many women now enjoy, and which they have so recently won from men (Urantia Book, 938)."

#3 Bonita

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 04:27 PM

It looks like Michael chose Urantia before Gabriel came out to study the human groups on the planet at that time. So the century may have nothing to do with anything except that it was time for Michael's seventh bestowal, nothing more. However, if there is a reason for Jesus choosing to be born in that particular century of Jewish history then I believe the reason is the ideal home life of the Jews of that day.


Well, although the family was important, a lot more went into the decision and TUB tells us that this time and place was the most ideal for Michael's bestowal. Seems to me that God would choose the perfect time, place and persons to be involved in his revelation.

121:1.1 When Michael incarnated on Urantia, the world presented the most favorable condition for the Creator Son's bestowal that had ever previously prevailed or has since obtained.



Also consider this quote:

134.0.1 During the Mediterranean journey Jesus had carefully studied the people he met and the countries through which he passed, and at about this time he reached his final decision as to the remainder of his life on earth. He had fully considered and now finally approved the plan which provided that he be born of Jewish parents in Palestine, and he therefore deliberately returned to Galilee to await the beginning of his lifework as a public teacher of truth; he began to lay plans for a public career in the land of his father Joseph’s people, and he did this of his own free will.



It seems to me, in reading the above quote, that Michael was following is Father's will when incarnating as a Jew in Palestine. And reading the next quote, suggests that Jesus further conferred with the Father's plan, choosing Palestine again for the full enactment of his bestowal experience.

134.0.2 Jesus had found out through personal and human experience that Palestine was the best place in all the Roman world wherein to set forth the closing chapters, and to enact the final scenes, of his life on earth. For the first time he became fully satisfied with the program of openly manifesting his true nature and of revealing his divine identity among the Jews and gentiles of his native Palestine. He definitely decided to finish his life on earth and to complete his career of mortal existence in the same land in which he entered the human experience as a helpless babe. His Urantia career began among the Jews in Palestine, and he chose to terminate his life in Palestine and among the Jews.



TUB also tells us that the Roman period known as the Pax Romana was ideal for Michael's bestowal.

121:3.1 Although the social and economic condition of the Roman state was not of the highest order, the widespread domestic peace and prosperity was propitious for the bestowal of Michael.

121:1.6 The first struggles between the expanding Roman and Parthian states had been concluded in the then recent past, leaving Syria in the hands of the Romans. In the times of Jesus, Palestine and Syria were enjoying a period of prosperity, relative peace, and extensive commercial intercourse with the lands to both the East and the West.



There's a quote I can't find that says something about the Jewish home life of that day and generation was ideal and at no other time in history has there been a more ideal family life. I know the quote is there somewhere.


Is this it?

123.2.5 There were few homes in the gentile world of those days that could give a child a better intellectual, moral, and religious training than the Jewish homes of Galilee. These Jews had a systematic program for rearing and educating their children. They divided a child’s life into seven stages: 1. The newborn child, the first to the eighth day. 2. The suckling child. 3. The weaned child. 4. The period of dependence on the mother, lasting up to the end of the fifth year. 5. The beginning independence of the child and, with sons, the father assuming responsibility for their education. 6. The adolescent youths and maidens. 7. The young men and the young women.



#4 Midsoniter woman

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 07:08 AM

The systematic educational environment of the Jewish home life doesn't exist anymore. It's just gone. It sounds awesome, though. I like the way boys were turned over to their father. I also like the way they always made the oldest son the head of the household and the oldest daughter had the responsibility of oldest daughter duties.

"Before taking up his new employment at Sepphoris, Jesus held one of his periodic family conferences and solemnly installed James, then just past eighteen years old, as acting head of the family (1410)."

"When James had had two years’ experience as acting head of the family — and two full years before he (James) was to be married — Joseph was placed in charge of the household funds and intrusted with the general management of the home (1410)."

"After Miriam had laid her plans before Jesus, he directed that Jacob should come to him making formal request for her and promised his blessing for the marriage just as soon as she felt that Martha was competent to assume her duties as eldest daughter (1414)."

"Even the little tots had their regular duties to perform in the well-regulated scheme of management which characterized the home life of this Nazareth family (1393)."
"If woman aspires literally to enjoy all of man's rights, then sooner or later, pitiless and emotionless competition will certainly replace that chivalry and special consideration which many women now enjoy, and which they have so recently won from men (Urantia Book, 938)."

#5 Bonita

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 10:15 AM

One of the things which has always intrigued me is hostile feelings the Jews of Jerusalem had against the Samaritans. TUB explains the dispute as follows:

143:4.1 For more than six hundred years the Jews of Judea, and later on those of Galilee also, had been at enmity with the Samaritans. This ill feeling between the Jews and the Samaritans came about in this way: About seven hundred years B.C., Sargon, king of Assyria, in subduing a revolt in central Palestine carried away and into captivity over twenty-five thousand Jews of the northern kingdom of Israel and installed in their place an almost equal number of the descendants of the Cuthites, Sepharvites, and the Hamathites. Later on, Ashurbanipal sent still other colonies to dwell in Samaria.



Josephus describes the event, which Maier places in 722B.C.:

After Pekah, king of Israel, had ruled for twenty years, he was killed through a conspiracy organized by one of his friends named Hosea, who made himself king. Hosea secretly allied with So, the king of Egypt, against the Assyrians. When Shalmaneser V, king of Assyria heard this, he besieged Samaria for three years until he captured it. Then he completely destroyed the government of Israel, transporting all its people, including Hosea, to Media and Persia. He gave their country to the Cutheans, who settled in Samaria. (Maier, pg.175)


A footnote later explains that Shalmaneser V of Assyria died at the time Samaria was being captured in 722B.C. and it was his successor Sargon II who actually deported the population. Josephus goes on to explain how the Cutheans became Jews:

When the Cutheans first came into Samaria, each of their five tribes reverenced its own god. But God sent an epidemic on them, and may died. When they could not cure their miseries, a prophet told them that if they worshiped the Most High God they would be relieved. Thus they sent emissaries to the king of Assyria, asking him to send them some of the Israelite priests he had taken captive. The priests came and tauht the Samaritans the worship of God, and the plague stopped immediately. These same rites have continued to this day among those who are called Cuthim in Hebrew, and Samaritans in Greek. They vary in their attitude to the Jews, calling them relatives when they are prospering, but aliens when they are in trouble. (Maier, pg. 175)


It is also interesting to note that Samaria, the city, was the capital of Israel at this time and Jerusalem was only a peasant town. The people of Samaria worshipped many gods including Yahweh. After Samaria fell and the population was deported, Jerusalem in Judea began to dominate along with their god, Yahweh. But Jerusalem eventually fell too in 586BC with the deportation of Jews to Babylon and decimation of the city and its temple.

TUB goes on to describe how the religious hostility between the Jews and Samaritans began:

143:4.2 The religious enmity between the Jews and the Samaritans dated from the return of the former from the Babylonian captivity, when the Samaritans worked to prevent the rebuilding of Jerusalem.



This event occurred around 538B.C. when Babylon was conquered by Cyrus the Great and the Jews were allowed to return home and rebuild Jerusalem and the temple. But because there was no king from the house of David, the priests of Jerusalem rose to prominence, and they declared that the temple in Jerusalem was the only true sanctuary of Yahweh. Meanwhile, there was already a cult worshiping Yahweh in Samaria.

But more importantly, it should be noted that the worship of gods and the sovereignty of the state were so intertwined, in that the gods gave one state power over the other, which makes the political enmity of the time inseparable from the religious enmity. The Samerians felt they had a political right to prevent the rebuilding of Jerusalem. Jerusalem was a peasant town whereas Samaria was the capital of the region (the satrapy, or state, called "Transeuphrates") and a far more cosmopolitan city, where polytheism was a matter of civilized behavior. Although many Samarians believed in Yahweh, they saw no reason to worship him in Jerusalem.

Josephus describes the event this way:

While they were laying the foundations of the temple, the Cutheans who settled in Samaria urged the satraps to obstruct the Jews from rebuilding the city and temple. And when Cyrus died, shortly afterward, the Samaritans and most neighboring states wrote his son Cambyses that the Jews were a proud and rebellious race. And if they became powerful again, the letter said, the Jews would not submit to the rule of the Persians or pay them tribute, but would attempt to overthrow them. Cambyses believed them and ordered the Jews to stop rebuilding the city and the temple. (Maier, pg. 188)


It wasn't until 520B.C. under Darius I that things changed for the Jews in Jerusalem when a person with Davidic kingship arose:

These favorable circumstances stirred up in the Jewish patricians, priests and prophets a powerful yearning for the restoration of Zion, after the attempt made under Sheshbazzar had failed. As a result, in 520 a large group of Zionists from the Diaspora, under the leadership of a patrician, Zerubbabel, and a priest, Jeshua, traveled to Jerusalem. Zerubbabel, a descendant of the Davidic kings, was able to appear in Jerusalem as the preseident of the Jewish community. He was surrounded by patricians called "elders", an assembly of noblemen still found in the High Council or Sanhedrin of the New Testament period. Jeshua, a descendant of the Zadokite priesthood, was looked upon in Jerusalem as a new hgh priest. Prophets like Haggai and Zechariah supported the policies of the returning settlers. The reconstruction of the Temple was once more undertaken courageously. On account of interference by the native population and the satrap of Syria, the Jews sought to base their undertaking upon a decree of Cyrus. They succeeded in winning the support of Darius. And so the Second Temple, the work of Zerubbabel, could be dedicated in 515B.C. (Reicke, pg. 12)


One should note the importance of Jeshua and the Zadokite priesthood as well as the importance of the Davidic line of kingship since both eventually became an essential part of the messianic yearnings of the Jewish people.

#6 Jovalso

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 08:24 PM

Hi bonita,
I ( and certainly others) have missed your scholarly articles in the other forum.
Is there a possibility for you to come back?
Jovalso.

#7 Bonita

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 09:09 PM

Thank you for your kind comments Jovalso. I didn't leave the other forum, my account was deleted by adm. without so much as a courtesy PM or an explanation. I think it would require a public apology, don't you? But frankly, I think one forum is enough. This is a very friendly and gracious place.

Edited by Bonita, 07 July 2010 - 10:38 PM.


#8 Bonita

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 01:26 PM

TUB goes on to describe further reasons why the Jerusalem Jews disdained the Samaritans.

143:4.2 Later they offended the Jews by extending friendly assistance to the armies of Alexander. In return for their friendship Alexander gave the Samaritans permission to build a temple on Mount Gerizim, where they worshiped Yahweh and their tribal gods and offered sacrifices much after the order of the temple services at Jerusalem.



Darius III was the king of the Achaemenid Empire of Persia at the time of Alexander the Great and Sanballat III was the governor (satrap) of Samaria under him. The high priest in Jerusalem at the time was allegedly Jaddua. Remember that Jerusalem in Judah was under the rule of the same governor Sanballat. In order to further understand the reason why the incident between Alexander and the Samaritans it's important to know the back story.

Jaddua had a brother Manasseh who was also a priest who married Sanballat's daughter. Recall that the Jerusalem Jews at this point considered the Samaritan Jews to be foreigners, the Cuthites brought to the land by Sargon in 700B.C.. It was against Jewish law to marry foreigners, hence there was a great deal of animosity toward Manasseh. Here's how Josephus tells the story:

When Johanan died, his son Jaddua succeeded to the high priesthood and he had a brother named Manasseh. Now Sanballat had been sent by Darius III, the last king of Persia, as satrap of Samaria. He was a Cuthean by birth--the Samaritans also came from the same stock--and he was anxious to live on friendly terms with the Jews, so he gladly gave his daughter in marriage to Manasseh.
But when Jaddua became high priest, the elders of Jerusalem were disturbed that Manasseh, who was married to a foreigner, participated with him in priestly duties. They were concerned that his marriage would encourage others to transgress the law against taking foreign wives. Thus they commanded Manasseh either to divorce his wife or not approach the altar. the high priest himself joined with the people in their anger against his brother, and kept him fro the altar.
Manasseh went to his father-in-law, Sanballat, and told him that although he loved his daughter, he would be forced to give her up. But Sanballat told him that he could keep his wife, and not only be a priest but governor and high priest. for with Darius' consent, Sanballat would build another temple on Mount Gerizim, the tallest mountain near Samaria.
Elated, Manasseh stayed with Sanballat. Many other priests and people who had married foreign women deserted to Manasseh and Sanballat, who settled them in Samaria. (Maier pgs. 200-201)


When Alexander the Great was marching his way through Macedonia, Sanballat believed that Darius III would be able to defeat Alexander despite the fact that he had defeated all the other satraps as he advanced. Sanballat promised Manasseh that he would fulfill all his promises after Darius defeated Alexander, but Darius was slaughtered. In the meantime, prior to the death of Darius, Alexander sent a request to the high priest in Jerusalem for supplies and a pledge of allegiance to him. Jaddua, the high priest, refused, pledging his oath to Darius, which angered Alexander who decided to march against Jerusalem. When Sanballat heard about the death of Darius, he offered to join him along with the Samaritans. Josephus explains it as follows:

When Sanballat heard that Darius had been defeated, he decided to join Alexander with 8,000 Samaritans. The kind reception that Alexander gave him encouraged Sanballat to ask permission to divide the Jews by building a temple in Samaria, and permission was granted. So the new temple was built, and Manasseh was made high priest. But before it was finished Sanballat died. (Maier pg.202)


There is disagreement among scholars concerning the story as it is told by Josephus, but TUB tells us that it is fact that the Samaritans connived with Alexander to give their temple prestige over the one in Jerusalem, which is enough evidence to confirm the bitter struggle over supremacy between southern and northern Palestine which went on for almost a millennium.

#9 Jovalso

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 02:44 PM

Hi bonita,
Whatever you want, girl. I feel sorry for the other ones in the other forum that don't know you are participating in this forum (I do, and I am lucky for that), but the other ones certainly will miss you.
I would put this comment in a PM, but I wasn't able to find it here in this forum.
Jovalso

#10 Bonita

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 02:54 PM

Thanks Jovalso,

Believe me when I say that they know where I am.

#11 Bonita

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 02:08 PM

We know that Herod the Great died in the spring of 4B.C. and that Jesus' family left Alexandria for Bethlehem in August of the same year. It took Joseph some time to convince Mary to move back to Nazareth, but he prevailed and they left in October with a company of relatives because the trip was too dangerous.

123:0.6 By the first of October Joseph had convinced Mary and all their friends that it was best for them to return to Nazareth. Accordingly, early in October, 4 B.C., they departed from Bethlehem for Nazareth, going by way of Lydda and Scythopolis. They started out early one Sunday morning, Mary and the child riding on their newly acquired beast of burden, while Joseph and five accompanying kinsmen proceeded on foot; Joseph's relatives refused to permit them to make the trip to Nazareth alone. They feared to go to Galilee by Jerusalem and the Jordan valley, and the western routes were not altogether safe for two lone travelers with a child of tender years.



Until recently, I always thought that the journey was dangerous because of the fear that Archelaus would some how discover that Jesus had not been killed with the infants in Bethlehem and try to do him harm. However, TUB has omitted some historical information which makes the type of danger they feared more understandable.

Large sections of the Jewish people were also gripped by a latent frenzy for liberty. The military ardor of the Maccabean period and the successes of the Hasmonean period had abundantly nourished the hopes formulated in the Holy Scriptures. During the Roman occupation and the Herodian tyranny these forces had been repressed; now the resulting explosion was all the more violent and was repeated, in various forms, over a considerable period.
Immediately after Herod's death in 4B.C., there was so much unrest in the Holy Land that Varus, the Roman governor of Syria (6-3B.C.), had to enter the land with three legions. (Reicke, p.112)


Recike goes on to describe the people and places of the revolts including those in Jerusalem where the procurator was confined in his palace and parts of the Temple were burnt; also Herod's palace in Jericho was destroyed. But, his description of the rebellious freedom fighters in the Galilee sheds some light on one of the reasons why when Jesus began his teaching mission, he did not include members of his family and always kept them in the dark as to his plans and travels.

Galilee, however, was the most important center of the freedom fighters. It already had a long history as the home of various rebel leaders. The commonest practice was for groups to gather around a specific family in which the office of pretender to the role of Messiah was considered hereditary. After the death of Herod, the self-declared Messiah was Judas, the son of a certain Hezekiah, a famous rebel who had been executed by Herod. . . .As previously under the Maccabees and later under the Zealots, members of the occupying forces and collaborators were murdered whenever possible. The serious new disturbances brought Varus to Palestine once more, and this time his legions were reinforced with Nabatean troops. He pacified Galilee and destroyed Sepphoris, the strongest fortress of Judas, the Galilean leader, then marched through Samaria to Jerusalem, dispersed the turbulent mob, and ordered the crucifixion of about two thousand Jews throughout the land. This fanatical uprising in 4B.C. was the first revolt of the Jews against Rome. It is not as famous as the Zealot revolts of A.D.6 and 66-70; account must be taken of it, however, if one wishes to understand the political tensions of Jesus' day. (Reicke pgs.112-113)


The land was overrun with freedom fighters, Roman soldiers and people were being crucified everywhere. It was no wonder that Joseph's family didn't want them traveling unaccompanied. Also as an aside, remember that Sepphoris was only 3 miles from Nazareth and the place where Joseph later worked to rebuild it for Herod Antipas, and also where he died. It was the city where Jesus later worked as a blacksmith and also one of the only two cities he told his apostles to avoid in their future work.

121:2.11 Antipas, like his father, was a great builder. He rebuilt many of the cities of Galilee, including the important trade center of Sepphoris.

137.5.1 On this journey Jesus talked over many things of importance to the coming kingdom with his newly chosen associates and especially warned them to make no mention of the turning of the water into wine. He also advised them to avoid the cities of Sepphoris and Tiberias in their future work.



#12 Rick Warren

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 03:29 PM

Bonita...But, his description of the rebellious freedom fighters in the Galilee sheds some light on one of the reasons why when Jesus began his teaching mission, he did not include members of his family and always kept them in the dark as to his plans and travels.



Enjoying the history Bonita,

Maybe there's at least one other reason Jesus' family always seemed at arm's length. It's been a point of fascination to learn his family wasn't persecuted before or after his death. One can't help but think he planned things that way--that he dearly cherished his family, and knew better than to employ them in his deadly enterprise of truth revealing under the gaze of an entrenched and hostile clergy.

#13 Bonita

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Posted 13 July 2010 - 06:20 PM

Maybe there's at least one other reason Jesus' family always seemed at arm's length. It's been a point of fascination to learn his family wasn't persecuted before or after his death.


That is not really true, James was martyred in 62A.D. in connection with an attack on popular prophets, which Ananus II instigated during an interregnum. Jesus kept his family safe while he was alive by disallowing the public from having the image of a sacred "messiah" family; but, once he was resurrected that changed and Jesus did call James to be a "director of the kingdom".

138.0.1 But Jesus planned to have no close relatives as members of this corps of apostolic directors of the kingdom.



In the following quotes you can read that Jesus specifically called James to join the apostolic "directors of the kingdom". There were no others that Jesus directly called to the service of the kingdom after his resurrection. You will note that Jesus forecasted certain events to James and told him not to say anything about the discussion, which he never did. James was going to go to Galilee, but after talking privately to Jesus, decided to return to Jerusalem instead and it is likely that he knew that he would become a leader of the Jerusalem church.

190:2.3 In the meantime, as they looked for James and before they found him, while he stood there in the garden near the tomb, he became aware of a near-by presence, as if someone had touched him on the shoulder; and when he turned to look, he beheld the gradual appearance of a strange form by his side. He was too much amazed to speak and too frightened to flee. And then the strange form spoke, saying: "James, I come to call you to the service of the kingdom. Join earnest hands with your brethren and follow after me." When James heard his name spoken, he knew that it was his eldest brother, Jesus, who had addressed him. They all had more or less difficulty in recognizing the morontia form of the Master, but few of them had any trouble recognizing his voice or otherwise identifying his charming personality when he once began to communicate with them.

190:2.4 When James perceived that Jesus was addressing him, he started to fall to his knees, exclaiming, "My father and my brother," but Jesus bade him stand while he spoke with him. And they walked through the garden and talked for almost three minutes; talked over experiences of former days and forecast the events of the near future. As they neared the house, Jesus said, "Farewell, James, until I greet you all together."

190:2.7 They all wanted to rush off to the city to tell the doubting apostles about what had happened, but James restrained them. Mary Magdalene, only, was permitted to return to Joseph's house. James forbade their publishing abroad the fact of this morontia visit because of certain things which Jesus had said to him as they conversed in the garden. But James never revealed more of his visit with the risen Master on this day at the Lazarus home in Bethany.



How do we know that James was called to be a leader of the church? I think we can deduce from Jesus' conversation with Andrew that this was his plan.

192.2.7 When they returned to the others, Jesus went for a walk and talk with Andrew and James. When they had gone a short distance, Jesus said to Andrew, “Andrew, do you trust me?” And when the former chief of the apostles heard Jesus ask such a question, he stood still and answered, “Yes, Master, of a certainty I trust you, and you know that I do.” Then said Jesus: “Andrew, if you trust me, trust your brethren more — even Peter. I once trusted you with the leadership of your brethren. Now must you trust others as I leave you to go to the Father. When your brethren begin to scatter abroad because of bitter persecutions, be a considerate and wise counselor to James my brother in the flesh when they put heavy burdens upon him which he is not qualified by experience to bear. And then go on trusting, for I will not fail you. When you are through on earth, you shall come to me.”



My theory is that while he was alive and teaching, Jesus tried to avoid drawing attention to himself as a member of the "rebellion" with hopes of stressing the spiritual nature of his mission. After his death and his mission complete, it was not as important to keep his family separate from taking an active part in the growth of the kingdom for two reasons: he had established, by his death and resurrection, the fact that he was not the Jewish messiah, and he was more able to assist his family with his endowment of the Spirit of Truth. Regardless though, Mary died within one year and we don't know why.

187.4.7 John took the mother of Jesus to the place where he tarried in Jerusalem and then hastened back to the scene of the crucifixion. After the Passover Mary returned to Bethsaida, where she lived at John’s home for the rest of her natural life. Mary did not live quite one year after the death of Jesus.



#14 Rick Warren

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 03:59 AM

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Do you know where the date and circumstances of James ben Joseph's death are in the text, Bonita?



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#15 Bonita

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 06:44 AM

No, I don't believe that TUB describes the death of James, the Lord's brother. However, it is well documented in the historical literature that he was thrown from the Temple Mount and stoned by the Sanhedrin. A monument still stands there.

James the Just

James the Less

#16 Nigel Nunn

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 08:09 AM

However, it is well documented in the historical literature ...
James the Just
James the Less

I had no idea about this main-stream discussion of "the brother of Jesus".
Bonita, your research is a great help -- thank you!
Nigel

#17 Bonita

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 08:45 AM

I'm happy to think that my hobby has some value for others. TUB has only given us a partial look at history, correcting major errors about only some things. However, there is so, so much more out there to learn.

Did you know that Simon, Jesus' other brother headed the church in Jerusalem after James' martyrdom?

St. Simeon of Jerusalem

Edited by Bonita, 14 July 2010 - 09:01 AM.


#18 Rick Warren

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 09:41 AM

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Agreed, thanks the service Bonita,

However, I don't think it can be said with any certainty that it was the Master's brother who was martyred in 62 AD. Both of those links had info that confused the three James: Zebedee, Alpheus and Ben Joseph.

From Wiki, which echoed the other link:


Saint James the Just (Hebrew: יעקב) (Greek Iάκωβος), (died AD 62), also known as James the Righteous, James of Jerusalem, James Adelphotheos, or James, the Brother of the Lord, was an important figure in Early Christianity. The Catholic Encyclopedia concludes that, based on Hegesippus's account, it is "probable" that James the Just is also James the Less, and in line with "most Catholic interpreters", that he is therefore James, son of Alphaeus as well as James the son of Mary.[1]. He is not, however, identified with James the Great.[1] James the Just was the leader of the Christian movement in Jerusalem in the decades after Jesus' death, but information about his life is scarce and ambiguous. Several early sources described him as the brother of Jesus; historians have variously interpreted this description as perhaps meaning a brother in a spiritual sense, or more literally as meaning that James was a close family relative of Jesus'- perhaps his full brother, half- or stepbrother, a cousin, or some other relation. The oldest surviving Christian liturgy, the Liturgy of St James, called him "the brother of God" (Adelphotheos).[2]



http://en.wikipedia..../James_the_Just


From the UB:


...The [Alpheus] twins served faithfully until the end, until the dark days of trial, crucifixion, and despair. They never lost their heart faith in Jesus, and (save John) they were the first to believe in his resurrection. But they could not comprehend the establishment of the kingdom. Soon after their Master was crucified, they returned to their families and nets; their work was done. They had not the ability to go on in the more complex battles of the kingdom. But they lived and died conscious of having been honored and blessed with four years of close and personal association with a Son of God, the sovereign maker of a universe.... P.1564 - §5



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#19 Bonita

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 10:17 AM

What you fail to understand Rick, is that those articles are written by people who believe that Mary was a virgin and maintained herself as a virgin, meaning Jesus had no genuine brothers. They often designate them as sons of Clopas, and, that is because of the confusion over the various Marys, believing that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was wedded to Clopas after the death of Joseph. Further confusing things is the belief that the name "Clopas" is the Greek version of the name "Alpheus".

John 19:25 Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother's sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene.


Therefore, they confuse the Mary's and the sons of the Mary's. It is well accepted among biblical scholars that James the Just/Less was the Lord's brother. It is also documented by historians.

#20 Midsoniter woman

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 10:46 AM

My theory is that while he was alive and teaching, Jesus tried to avoid drawing attention to himself as a member of the "rebellion" with hopes of stressing the spiritual nature of his mission. After his death and his mission complete, it was not as important to keep his family separate from taking an active part in the growth of the kingdom for two reasons: he had established, by his death and resurrection, the fact that he was not the Jewish messiah, and he was more able to assist his family with his endowment of the Spirit of Truth. Regardless though, Mary died within one year and we don't know why.

187.4.7 John took the mother of Jesus to the place where he tarried in Jerusalem and then hastened back to the scene of the crucifixion. After the Passover Mary returned to Bethsaida, where she lived at John’s home for the rest of her natural life. Mary did not live quite one year after the death of Jesus.



Mary died of post traumatic stress. She watched her son executed on a cross next to thieves after he was whipped to a bloody pulp. I don't care for Mel Gibson's Passion, but it might have happened the way the movie portrayed. We weren't there to say it didn't happen like that. The Passion of Christ turned me off Hollywood forever. Instead of spiritual inspiration, it was more like watching an episode of Saw, which is just aggrandizing an opportunity to make money off violence in history. I have post traumatic stress just from watching the Mel Gibson movie. Hollywood leaves no violence in history unaggrandized. Remember the UB teaches us that fear can kill and stress is not much different than fear. We humans must reduce stress. We must or it kills us or causes us disease.


"The difficulty in combating magic arises from the fact that fear can kill (971)."

"It was just another of those instances in which his earth family could not comprehend that he must be about his Father’s business. And so Mary and his brothers were deeply hurt when, notwithstanding that he paused in his speaking to receive the message, instead of his rushing out to greet them, they heard his musical voice speak with increased volume: “Say to my mother and my brothers that they should have no fear for me. The Father who sent me into the world will not forsake me; neither shall any harm come upon my family. Bid them be of good courage and put their trust in the Father of the kingdom. But, after all, who is my mother and who are my brothers?” And stretching forth his hands toward all of his disciples assembled in the room, he said: “I have no mother; I have no brothers. Behold my mother and behold my brethren! For whosoever does the will of my Father who is in heaven, the same is my mother, my brother, and my sister.”"

"And when Mary heard these words, she collapsed in Jude’s arms. They carried her out in the garden to revive her while Jesus spoke the concluding words of his parting message (1722)."


Mary's not the only one who has post traumatic stress. The universe government has given us nothing but a book to read. No one's coming down here in person again. IMO

Edited by Midsoniter woman, 14 July 2010 - 11:03 AM.

"If woman aspires literally to enjoy all of man's rights, then sooner or later, pitiless and emotionless competition will certainly replace that chivalry and special consideration which many women now enjoy, and which they have so recently won from men (Urantia Book, 938)."




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