Jump to content


Photo

Stockhausen Festival


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 31 August 2008 - 08:26 AM

Forum Friends,

Will anyone on this circuit be attending? Would appreciate very much a review from a qualified critic(s).

The announcement comes from this website:

http://www.huliq.com...hausen-festival


Southbank Centre Announces Stockhausen Festival

Southbank Centre has announced today the full line-up of concerts for the major Stockhausen festival as a centrepiece of its 2008/09 classical music season. KLANG: A Tribute to Karlheinz Stockhausen will run from 1 to 9 November 2008 and will include UK premieres of several major Stockhausen works and the world premiere of Urantia.


Six of the works to be performed are from the KLANG cycle, a cycle of pieces based on the 24 hours of the day. KLANG was being written right up to the composer's death in December 2007, by which time he had completed 21 of the 24 hours.

#2 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 02 September 2008 - 06:20 AM

.
.
.
Dear Forumites,

More on Stockhausen's compositions and his musical background, also links to his recordings :



Karlheinz StockhausenIn every sense, the composer was on a different wavelength.

By Matthew Guerrieri
Updated Friday, Dec. 21, 2007, at 5:20 PM ET
Posted Image
Karlheinz Stockhausen
Around 1911, William S. Sadler, a Chicago physician whose hobby was debunking paranormal claims, found a case that perplexed even him. "This man is utterly unconscious, wholly oblivious to what takes place, and unless told about it subsequently, never knows that he has been used as a sort of clearing house for the coming and going of alleged extra-planetary personalities," Sadler wrote. Eventually, "this man" (quite possibly Sadler's brother-in-law Wilfrid C. Kellogg, of the cornflake family) became the conduit for 2,097 pages of quasi-Jungian Christian cosmology, purportedly communicated by extraterrestrial beings, and published in 1955 as The Urantia Book.

The 14th section of the book maps the hierarchical waystations of the ascending soul, from Urantia (the Earth) all the way up to Havona, the last, billion-world stop before Paradise. "Love of adventure, curiosity, and dread of monotony … were not put there just to aggravate and annoy you during your short sojourn on earth," it reads, "but rather to suggest to you that death is only the beginning of an endless career of adventure, an everlasting life of anticipation, an eternal voyage of discovery." On Dec. 5, the 216th anniversary of Mozart's death, German composer Karlheinz Stockhausen began his endless career of adventure.

Stockhausen borrowed from The Urantia Book in his last completed major work, the seven-opera cycle Licht, which occupied him from 1977 until 2002 (and remains only five-sevenths performed). The book was one of a long line of spiritual systems—Catholicism, Sufism, the Integral Yoga of Sri Aurobindo—that Stockhausen embraced. But they were adjuncts to his true creed: Stockhausen was first and foremost a priest of sound, a clearinghouse for the coming and going of vibrations.

"We are all transistors in the literal sense," he proclaimed. Orphaned by the war—his mentally ill mother euthanized by the Nazis, his officer father killed near the conflict's end—he turned to the cosmos for guidance. "I closed my eyes and stood somewhere in the road or on the street—or, during the war, in a field where bombs were falling," he said, "and I wouldn't move until I heard a message." He came to consider himself an antenna for tuning in the music of the spheres.

Canadian pianist Glenn Gould included among his stable of satirical characters one Karlheinz Klopweisser: donning a long wig, brandishing an enormous electric wand, ruminating about the resonance of organic silence. It wasn't much of an exaggeration. The perception was that, as the summers of love faded, Stockhausen had lost his way, that the leading avant-garde composer of the 1950s and '60s—who gave electronic music a soul and made the arid calculations of serialism dazzlingly, confrontationally vivid—had gone off the psychedelic deep end. Once, prefacing some typically esoteric statement, Stockhausen himself inadvertently summed up critical opinion. "At this point, my argument is about to become metaphysical," he warned. "Most people have no intention of following me to this level."

But the metaphysics had been there from the outset. The landmark Gesange der Jünglinge, possibly the most epochal five-channel tape in musical history, grew out of a proposed Catholic mass for voices and electronic sounds, nixed by the Archbishop of Cologne on the now-quaint grounds that loudspeakers didn't belong in church. Gruppen, a three-conductor extravaganza that reinvented the orchestral showpiece with clangingly dissonant exhilaration (excerpt), included in its mathematical blueprint the contour of the Swiss Alps, as viewed from the room where Stockhausen composed: a communion with nature embedded in the code.

Stockhausen's relentless spiritual quest gave his works an exigent power, their arithmetic construction infused with cabalistic zeal. Completed in 1960, Kontakte (excerpt) especially in its incarnation for piano, percussion, and prerecorded sound, still stuns with its uncompromising fervor, its jagged utterances piling up with the lengthy, sustained intensity of a hellfire preacher. (Inori, a later piece for dancer and orchestra, cataloged worshipful postures from various cultures into a "chromatic scale of prayer gestures.")

A brief late-'60s flirtation with textual works—koanlike instructions for improvisation ("Play a vibration in the rhythm of your enlightenment")—had mixed results. In the aftermath of his second marriage, Stockhausen had a vision of a universe where the music he imagined would happen spontaneously; the problem was, nobody spontaneously imagined music quite the way Stockhausen did. Instead, beginning with the hypnotic Mantra (1970), Stockhausen took back control, with intuitively composed melodies becoming the recombinant seeds for a labyrinthine structure. The idea would fuel the rest of Stockhausen's output, including the cathedral of Licht: musical "formulas" schematically stretched across hours or compressed to a singularity. Alpha and omega.

The man Jonathan Cott once called "an agent provocateur for the divine" caused one last scandal after 9/11, when news reports quoted him calling the destruction of the World Trade Center "the biggest work of art there ever has been." Stockhausen protested, with justification, that his words had been taken out of context—but by that time, his context was so individual that almost anything would be. The evangelist had become an anchorite, publishing his own music, selling his own recordings, starting his own school, working primarily with a close group of companions and offspring. Interviewed by Icelandic singer-songwriter Björk (like the Beatles and Miles Davis, a fan), the guru shrugged: "I have concentrated on composition and I have missed almost everything that the world offers to me." In every sense, he was on a different wavelength.

Stockhausen's death rendered the musical world less outlandish and more reasonable—but also less ambitious and more boring. Detractors called him a charlatan. If so, Stockhausen—who, as a young man, spent a year as a touring accompanist for an illusionist—never undermined the act with so much as a wink. His fierce earnestness made even his most baffling manifestos hard to dismiss out of hand. He was, in the end, the leading character in his own fantastic fable: Baron Stockhausen, riding on cannonballs, floating to the moon, telling his epic, tall musical tales, which, for all their implausibility, just might be true. As of Dec. 5, concerts on the Havona worlds are a lot more interesting.


Link to this article, Slate online magazine.

Edited by Rick Warren, 02 September 2008 - 06:22 AM.


#3 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 04 September 2008 - 07:45 AM

Forum Friends,

You may be (justifiably) wondering 'why is he going on about this?' Here's what has me concerned enough to bring it to the reader community:

1. Stockhausen has named his epic audio/visual artistic presentation URANTIA.

2. It debuts the first week of November and lasts over a week.

3. At least part of the avant-garde art community consider him a transcendent genius. (A deceased transcendent genius is very much more influential than a live one.)

4. Stockhausen claims to have acquired his musical training from teachers of Sirius, the Dog Star.

5. Stockhausen said 911 was "the greatest work of art there ever has been" and he made a cryptic video with that title (he did protest saying his words were taken out of context).

Readers are always exchanging names of famous readers. Not yet sure if Stockhausen was a reader, but I am sure his "music" is compelling and he will reach much broader fame. But I would call his art a multi-media presentation before I would call it music. To sample his works, type Stockhausen into YouTube's search engine. There are 39, including a five minute interview.

Still exploring this, Rick

#4 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 07 November 2008 - 04:53 AM

Hey Guys. Urantia is playing.

Press release

Stockhausen world premiere in London

Klang-Festival: A tribute to Karlheinz Stockhausen

URANTIA

for soprano (tape) and electronic music

Layers 9 – 8 – 7 from COSMIC PULSES)

19th Hour of KLANG – The 24 Hours of the Day

(Duration 19'45")

URANTIA was composed in 2007. The Southbank Centre, London, commissioned the world première as 8-channel tape projection of the soprano voice (Kathinka Pasveer) and electronic music which will tape place on November 8th 2008 at the Queen Elizabeth Hall during a Stockhausen Festival from November 1st–9th 2008.

KLANG is the title for Southbank Centre's festival in honour of Karlheinz Stockhausen. Under the curatorship of Southbank Centre Associate Artist Oliver Knussen, the festival presents the world premiere of URANTIA, a work commissioned from Stockhausen by Southbank Centre for the festival and the UK premiere of ZODIAC for orchestra.

Links:
www.southbankcentre.co.uk/festivals-series/stockhausen-festival

(Information: South Bank Centre, www.southbankcentre.co.uk)
Saturday 1 November - Sunday 9 November 2008
Southbank Centre, Belvedere Road, London SE1 8XX, U.K.

Stockhausen Foundation for Music

Kettenberg 15


51515 Kuerten

Germany

Fax 02268-1813

www.stockhausen.org

#5 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 14 November 2008 - 06:52 PM


.

Forum Friends,

There's some diversity of opinion in the Google blogisphere in the aftermath of the Festival.

Links to Blogger's comments on the Stockhausen Festival:


Google Groups Alert for: urantia


Re: Klang Festival: London
Daniel Wolf djw...@snafu.de rec music classical contemporary There is an interesting response by a Urantia follower to an item on my blog, ...
rec.music.classical.contemporary - Nov 14, 2008 by - 38 message - 9 author


.

#6 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 15 November 2008 - 06:40 PM

.


[The following comments are from one member of a public Google chatgroup. To read the whole conversation take this link: Re: Klang Festival: London]


Hi,

I totally agree with you.
I've been looking for a clarification about this Urantia/Stockhausen
connection for many years.


During the conversations I had with him in 1997, and which were used
in my book, I wanted to tackle this subject, and I quoted Michael
Kurtz ('Stockhausen - A Biography" - 1992 Faber & Faber p.196) :
"After the summer break in 1974, the dynamic scales for Inori having
been completed, Stockhausen welcomed his students in a most unusaul
way. He came in, placed the The Urantia Book on the table, with a
resounding crunch and said: "If you want to go on being my pupils,
you must read this!"

Stockhausen seemed surprised and upset, as if he had never read the
book, neither the first German 1988 edition, nor Toop's translation
(which would be highly improbable), and immediatly replied : "This is
pure invention! Kurtz made up this whole story!"

Despite this denial, I dared to insist, and pointed out how many
references to The Urantia Book can be found in "Licht". Stockhausen
did acknowledge this fact, but obviously trying to fudge the subject,
explained that all the names, the signs (Michael and Luzifer), all
these references were only a kind of "material" that he have wanting
to use... He said that this book didn't mean very much to him at the
beginning (it had been offered to him by a strange man at the end of
the world premiere of "Hymnen with Orchestra", in New York on the
25th of February 1971), that Mary Bauermeister was much more interested
than him, and that he only started being interested when reading in
1974 some chapters about Michael: then he felt really resonating with
the book...

I asked: "Would you recommend its reading to anyone wanting to study
the symbolism of "Licht". He answered: "Yes, of course"
I insisted again: "Since this means The Urantia Book is a VERY
important way to approaching and understanding "Licht", why don't you
say it in a more explicite and clear way, for example in the
performance programme texts, or the CD booklets? He answered : "No
one, except you, seems to be interested in this book... So..."
And his tone showed me that I had already been too far, and he was
willing to talk about something else.


That's all I could get from him. This only shows he was reluctant
talking about this subject. I think that so many people, journalists
or even colleagues have mocked him about his "mystical" side (coming
from Sirius, etc.), that he was becoming cautious, and unwilling to
give all his detractors something more to chew over. I haven't read
the whole Urantia Book, but large sections enough to tell you that,
yes, it is assuredly quite barmy and wild...

For those who might be interested, there is a very good book about
this stuff: "Urantia: The Great Cult Mystery" - 1995 - Prometheus
Books, by Martin Gardner.


Maybe did he also feel some kind of bitterness about the Urantia
Brotherhood because they didn't seem to be interested at all in the
way Stockhausen was connecting his music with their book? Let's not
forget they refused permission to having a section of The Urantia
Book printed in "Inori"'s premiere programme booklet.

About two years ago, I had the strange and unexpected opportunity to
meet some hot shots from the French Urantia Brotherhood, and they
were completely unaware of Stockhausen connecting "Licht" with their book.
Anyway, they were even barely aware of Stockhausen himself...

This reminds me another conversation with Stockhausen in Kuerten in
1978, when he told me that after being so interested and involved in
Sri Aurobindo's yoga and philosophy, he had sent to the Sri Aurobindo
Ashram in Pondicherry, almost all of his recordings, especially "Aus
den sieben Tagen", and had never received any slightest thank you.
Someone he knew, and who was an "ashramite", told him, a couple of
years after, that he had seen Stockhausen's LP records all dusty on a
shelf in a closet among thousands of other junk... I remember I have
felt biiterness in his voice when he was telling me this story.
Maybe something similar happened with the Urantia guys? Who knows?


All that I know is that the Urantia "Michael" sign, lightly modified
by Stockhausen (I guess for trademark reasons), is on his tombstone.
And it surely means a lot.


Best regards.
XXXX


Interesting eh? Rick


.

#7 Richard Toop

Richard Toop

    poster

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 15 February 2009 - 09:16 PM

Perhaps I can shed some light on this, not as the translator of Michael Kurtz’s book, but as Stockhausen’s teaching assistant at the time. When he first introduced the Urantia Book to the composition class, he was very emphatic that we should all get a copy, but I don’t remember him making it a condition of studying with him (since these were students at the Cologne Musikhochschule, not private students, he couldn’t really have done that anyway). I rather doubt whether anyone did get a copy back then, partly because it looked rather beyond our financial means, but also because – with the notable exception of Claude Vivier – we were frankly a pretty unspiritual bunch. So I think Kurtz’s claim, while not entirely off the mark, is a bit exaggerated.
Richard Toop

.

[The following comments are from one member of a public Google chatgroup. To read the whole conversation take this link: Re: Klang Festival: London]


Hi,

I totally agree with you.
I've been looking for a clarification about this Urantia/Stockhausen
connection for many years.


During the conversations I had with him in 1997, and which were used
in my book, I wanted to tackle this subject, and I quoted Michael
Kurtz ('Stockhausen - A Biography" - 1992 Faber & Faber p.196) :
"After the summer break in 1974, the dynamic scales for Inori having
been completed, Stockhausen welcomed his students in a most unusaul
way. He came in, placed the The Urantia Book on the table, with a
resounding crunch and said: "If you want to go on being my pupils,
you must read this!"

Stockhausen seemed surprised and upset, as if he had never read the
book, neither the first German 1988 edition, nor Toop's translation
(which would be highly improbable), and immediatly replied : "This is
pure invention! Kurtz made up this whole story!"

Despite this denial, I dared to insist, and pointed out how many
references to The Urantia Book can be found in "Licht". Stockhausen
did acknowledge this fact, but obviously trying to fudge the subject,
explained that all the names, the signs (Michael and Luzifer), all
these references were only a kind of "material" that he have wanting
to use... He said that this book didn't mean very much to him at the
beginning (it had been offered to him by a strange man at the end of
the world premiere of "Hymnen with Orchestra", in New York on the
25th of February 1971), that Mary Bauermeister was much more interested
than him, and that he only started being interested when reading in
1974 some chapters about Michael: then he felt really resonating with
the book...

I asked: "Would you recommend its reading to anyone wanting to study
the symbolism of "Licht". He answered: "Yes, of course"
I insisted again: "Since this means The Urantia Book is a VERY
important way to approaching and understanding "Licht", why don't you
say it in a more explicite and clear way, for example in the
performance programme texts, or the CD booklets? He answered : "No
one, except you, seems to be interested in this book... So..."
And his tone showed me that I had already been too far, and he was
willing to talk about something else.


That's all I could get from him. This only shows he was reluctant
talking about this subject. I think that so many people, journalists
or even colleagues have mocked him about his "mystical" side (coming
from Sirius, etc.), that he was becoming cautious, and unwilling to
give all his detractors something more to chew over. I haven't read
the whole Urantia Book, but large sections enough to tell you that,
yes, it is assuredly quite barmy and wild...

For those who might be interested, there is a very good book about
this stuff: "Urantia: The Great Cult Mystery" - 1995 - Prometheus
Books, by Martin Gardner.


Maybe did he also feel some kind of bitterness about the Urantia
Brotherhood because they didn't seem to be interested at all in the
way Stockhausen was connecting his music with their book? Let's not
forget they refused permission to having a section of The Urantia
Book printed in "Inori"'s premiere programme booklet.

About two years ago, I had the strange and unexpected opportunity to
meet some hot shots from the French Urantia Brotherhood, and they
were completely unaware of Stockhausen connecting "Licht" with their book.
Anyway, they were even barely aware of Stockhausen himself...

This reminds me another conversation with Stockhausen in Kuerten in
1978, when he told me that after being so interested and involved in
Sri Aurobindo's yoga and philosophy, he had sent to the Sri Aurobindo
Ashram in Pondicherry, almost all of his recordings, especially "Aus
den sieben Tagen", and had never received any slightest thank you.
Someone he knew, and who was an "ashramite", told him, a couple of
years after, that he had seen Stockhausen's LP records all dusty on a
shelf in a closet among thousands of other junk... I remember I have
felt biiterness in his voice when he was telling me this story.
Maybe something similar happened with the Urantia guys? Who knows?


All that I know is that the Urantia "Michael" sign, lightly modified
by Stockhausen (I guess for trademark reasons), is on his tombstone.
And it surely means a lot.


Best regards.
XXXX


Interesting eh? Rick


.



#8 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 16 February 2009 - 05:22 AM

Perhaps I can shed some light on this, not as the translator of Michael Kurtz’s book, but as Stockhausen’s teaching assistant at the time. When he first introduced the Urantia Book to the composition class, he was very emphatic that we should all get a copy, but I don’t remember him making it a condition of studying with him (since these were students at the Cologne Musikhochschule, not private students, he couldn’t really have done that anyway). I rather doubt whether anyone did get a copy back then, partly because it looked rather beyond our financial means, but also because – with the notable exception of Claude Vivier – we were frankly a pretty unspiritual bunch. So I think Kurtz’s claim, while not entirely off the mark, is a bit exaggerated.
Richard Toop



Thanks much Richard,

Did you attend the Festival last November? Do you know how it was received, in general?

Welcome, Rick

#9 Christian

Christian

    poster

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 07 July 2009 - 03:17 PM

Hi all,
I'm totally surprised abaout what Rick writes about his conversation about the UB with Stockhausen in 1997. I can only say that

- Stockhausen ordered several copies of the German UB translation at me to have it as a present
- that he talked about the UB to other people he told me when we met the last time in July 2007 in Kürten and
- that he was lucky about the German translation!!

Greetings from
Christian

#10 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 24 August 2012 - 07:52 AM

Forum Friends,

New article:
The Greatest Science Fiction Opera Composer in History


When he finished Light in 2003, Stockhausen moved on to Sound, a cycle of pieces for the 24 hours in a day. Here, he gives his most public embrace to The Urantia Book. In the fourth hour of the cycle, a man knocks on Heaven's Door for the better part of an hour before he finally gets it to open. Then the cycle embarks on a series of pieces named after locations in The Urantia Book. They are all places that an Earthling would visit on his extraterrestrial, afterlife adventure. More than a few of Stockhausen's acquaintances believe that with Sound, the composer was essentially writing his own requiem. Sure enough, he was felled by a heart attack before he could finish the cycle.


Source/photos/videos: http://io9.com/59371...oser-in-history




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users