Jump to content


Photo

PAPER 185 - THE TRIAL BEFORE PILATE

Jesus Trial

18 replies to this topic

#1 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 11 September 2014 - 03:53 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

[INTRODUCTION]

 

 

   SHORTLY after six o’clock on this Friday morning, April 7, A.D. 30, Jesus was brought before Pilate, the Roman procurator who governed Judea, Samaria, and Idumea under the immediate supervision of the legatus of Syria. The Master was taken into the presence of the Roman governor by the temple guards, bound, and was accompanied by about fifty of his accusers, including the Sanhedrist court (principally Sadduceans), Judas Iscariot, and the high priest, Caiaphas, and by the Apostle John. Annas did not appear before Pilate.

 

(1987.2)185:0.2 Pilate was up and ready to receive this group of early morning callers, having been informed by those who had secured his consent, the previous evening, to employ the Roman soldiers in arresting the Son of Man, that Jesus would be early brought before him. This trial was arranged to take place in front of the praetorium, an addition to the fortress of Antonia, where Pilate and his wife made their headquarters when stopping in Jerusalem.

 

(1987.3)185:0.3 Though Pilate conducted much of Jesus’ examination within the praetorium halls, the public trial was held outside on the steps leading up to the main entrance. This was a concession to the Jews, who refused to enter any gentile building where leaven might be used on this day of preparation for the Passover. Such conduct would not only render them ceremonially unclean and thereby debar them from partaking of the afternoon feast of thanksgiving but would also necessitate their subjection to purification ceremonies after sundown, before they would be eligible to partake of the Passover supper.

 

(1987.4)185:0.4 Although these Jews were not at all bothered in conscience as they intrigued to effect the judicial murder of Jesus, they were nonetheless scrupulous regarding all these matters of ceremonial cleanness and traditional regularity. And these Jews have not been the only ones to fail in the recognition of high and holy obligations of a divine nature while giving meticulous attention to things of trifling importance to human welfare in both time and eternity.

 

 

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#2 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 11 September 2014 - 04:04 AM

.

 

Greetings Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors!

 

WELCOME to the OPAD presentation of Paper 185. It has ten pages and eight Sections. This Paper has the details of a two hour period from around 6 to 8 am on April 7, 30 AD, the day Jesus is tried, sentenced, scourged, and crucified. He has only nine hours to live, but they will be excruciating, and not only for him! A whole universe, from Midwayers to the Divine Mother, is looking on. No doubt the Father himself must needs witness his son drink this awful cup and also divinely commiserate, perhaps even feel the pain just as deeply. It's the most tragically beautiful drama ever in Nebadon, and very hard to endure, even today.

 

  The reigning Jewish authorities, the Sadducees, have already pronounced him guilty in their chambers, but they now need the Romans to approve and carry out their death sentence. Therefore must they take Jesus before the local procurator, the governor of Judea, Pontius Pilate.

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate
2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

 

In the second and third paragraphs of the introduction the praetorium is mentioned:
 

...This trial was arranged to take place in front of the praetorium, an addition to the fortress of Antonia.... (1987.2)185:0.2

 

...Though Pilate conducted much of Jesus’ examination within the praetorium halls, the public trial was held outside on the steps leading up to the main entrance.... (1987.3)185:0.3
 

From Wikipedia:
 

In the New Testament, praetorium refers to the palace of Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect of Judea. According to the New Testament, this is where Jesus Christ was tried and condemned to death. The Bible refers to the Praetorium as the "common hall," the "governor's house," the "judgment hall," "Pilate's house," and the "palace."
 

From the Gospel of John, chapter 18:

 

28 Then led they Jesus from Caiaphas unto the hall of judgment: and it was early; and they themselves went not into the judgment hall, lest they should be defiled; but that they might eat the passover.

 

It looks like the praetorium is a small addition to the northern corner of Antonia fortress:

image001.gif

 

 

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

ctw01032.gif

MAP SOURCE

 

 

map-35-735px.jpg?1402517981

MAP SOURCE

 

***

 

Wonder who the Midwayers are pointing to in this last sentence of the introduction?:
 

...And these Jews have not been the only ones to fail in the recognition of high and holy obligations of a divine nature while giving meticulous attention to things of trifling importance to human welfare in both time and eternity....(1987.4)185:0.4

 

 

Synopsis of Paper 184:

 

Pontius Pilate had committed several errors early in his administration which incurred the displeasure of the emperor Tiberius. This situation gave the Judean Jewish leaders some leverage over Pilate. They had learned to use the threat of civil uprising to manipulate him.

 

The Sanhedrin brought Jesus before Pilate and asked permission to have him executed. Written charges were presented: perverting the nation and stirring people to rebellion, forbidding the people to pay tribute to Caesar, claiming to be king of the Jews and founding a new kingdom.

 

Jesus had not been legally convicted of any of these charges. Neither Jesus nor John responded to them when read aloud. Pilate was convinced that the proceeding was irregular and took Jesus and John into an inner chamber for a private examination.

 

After dismissing the first two charges, Pilate asked Jesus if he were king of the Jews and whether he was trying to found a new kingdom. Jesus replied, "Do you not perceive that my kingdom is not of this world?" Pilate asked, "Then you are a king after all?" Jesus answered, "Yes, I am such a king, and my kingdom is the family of the faith sons of my Father who is in heaven."

 

Pilate did not understand Jesus but he was convinced that he was nothing but a harmless visionary. He went back outside and told the priests that he had questioned Jesus and found no fault in him. The crowd became angry. One of the Sanhedrin declared that Pilate would long regret letting Jesus go.

 

Pilate, feeling pressured, announced that since Jesus was a Galilean he would send him to Herod, who had jurisdiction over Galilee. Jesus was brought before Herod but refused to answer Herod's questions. Herod sent him back to Pilate.

 

Pilate still wanted to set Jesus free. It had long been the custom to release a condemned man at Passover. It occurred to Pilate that he could release Jesus under this excuse. But the crowd called for the release of Barabbas, a man condemned for robbery and murder. Pilate was angry that the Jews requested mercy for a murderer instead of Jesus, but was afraid to defy the aroused Jews. "What shall I do with him who is called the king of the Jews?" And the crowd shouted, "Crucify him!" Pilate responded, "Why would you crucify this man? What evil has he done?" But they continued to cry out for his crucifixion.

 

Pilate decided to try one more tactic. He ordered the guards to scourge Jesus, hoping that this punishment would be enough to appease the crowds' anger. When the punishment ended, Pilate brought the prisoner before the crowd. The sight of the Master at this point was enough to send "a mighty shudder through the realms of a vast universe," but the crowd continued to shout for his death. Pilate knew Jesus was innocent, but he was unwilling to defy the Jewish leaders. Pilate released Barabbas.

 

Pontius Pilate's life ended in suicide. His wife Claudia became a believer in Jesus and contributed to the spread of the gospel.

 

SYNOPSIS SOURCE

 


The_Urantia_Book_Word_Cloud_185_375.jpg

 

WORD CLOUD OF PAPER 185


 

***

 

In tomorrow’s reading, Section 1. Pontius Pilate, the Midwayers give us a biographic profile of this weak, cowardly, "second rate" Roman governor. One whose wife became a convert!

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#3 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:09 AM


Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate

 

 

   If Pontius Pilate had not been a reasonably good governor of the minor provinces, Tiberius would hardly have suffered him to remain as procurator of Judea for ten years. Although he was a fairly good administrator, he was a moral coward. He was not a big enough man to comprehend the nature of his task as governor of the Jews. He failed to grasp the fact that these Hebrews had a real religion, a faith for which they were willing to die, and that millions upon millions of them, scattered here and there throughout the empire, looked to Jerusalem as the shrine of their faith and held the Sanhedrin in respect as the highest tribunal on earth.

 

(1988.1)185:1.2 Pilate did not love the Jews, and this deep-seated hatred early began to manifest itself. Of all the Roman provinces, none was more difficult to govern than Judea. Pilate never really understood the problems involved in the management of the Jews and, therefore, very early in his experience as governor, made a series of almost fatal and well-nigh suicidal blunders. And it was these blunders that gave the Jews such power over him. When they wanted to influence his decisions, all they had to do was to threaten an uprising, and Pilate would speedily capitulate. And this apparent vacillation, or lack of moral courage, of the procurator was chiefly due to the memory of a number of controversies he had had with the Jews and because in each instance they had worsted him. The Jews knew that Pilate was afraid of them, that he feared for his position before Tiberius, and they employed this knowledge to the great disadvantage of the governor on numerous occasions.

 

(1988.2)185:1.3 Pilate’s disfavor with the Jews came about as a result of a number of unfortunate encounters. First, he failed to take seriously their deep-seated prejudice against all images as symbols of idol worship. Therefore he permitted his soldiers to enter Jerusalem without removing the images of Caesar from their banners, as had been the practice of the Roman soldiers under his predecessor. A large deputation of Jews waited upon Pilate for five days, imploring him to have these images removed from the military standards. He flatly refused to grant their petition and threatened them with instant death. Pilate, himself being a skeptic, did not understand that men of strong religious feelings will not hesitate to die for their religious convictions; and therefore was he dismayed when these Jews drew themselves up defiantly before his palace, bowed their faces to the ground, and sent word that they were ready to die. Pilate then realized that he had made a threat which he was unwilling to carry out. He surrendered, ordered the images removed from the standards of his soldiers in Jerusalem, and found himself from that day on to a large extent subject to the whims of the Jewish leaders, who had in this way discovered his weakness in making threats which he feared to execute.

 

(1988.3)185:1.4 Pilate subsequently determined to regain this lost prestige and accordingly had the shields of the emperor, such as were commonly used in Caesar worship, put up on the walls of Herod’s palace in Jerusalem. When the Jews protested, he was adamant. When he refused to listen to their protests, they promptly appealed to Rome, and the emperor as promptly ordered the offending shields removed. And then was Pilate held in even lower esteem than before.

 

(1988.4)185:1.5 Another thing which brought him into great disfavor with the Jews was that he dared to take money from the temple treasury to pay for the construction of a new aqueduct to provide increased water supply for the millions of visitors to Jerusalem at the times of the great religious feasts. The Jews held that only the Sanhedrin could disburse the temple funds, and they never ceased to inveigh against Pilate for this presumptuous ruling. No less than a score of riots and much bloodshed resulted from this decision. The last of these serious outbreaks had to do with the slaughter of a large company of Galileans even as they worshiped at the altar.

 

(1988.5)185:1.6 It is significant that, while this vacillating Roman ruler sacrificed Jesus to his fear of the Jews and to safeguard his personal position, he finally was deposed as a result of the needless slaughter of Samaritans in connection with the pretensions of a false Messiah who led troops to Mount Gerizim, where he claimed the temple vessels were buried; and fierce riots broke out when he failed to reveal the hiding place of the sacred vessels, as he had promised. As a result of this episode, the legatus of Syria ordered Pilate to Rome. Tiberius died while Pilate was on the way to Rome, and he was not reappointed as procurator of Judea. He never fully recovered from the regretful condemnation of having consented to the crucifixion of Jesus. Finding no favor in the eyes of the new emperor, he retired to the province of Lausanne, where he subsequently committed suicide.

 

(1989.1)185:1.7 Claudia Procula, Pilate’s wife, had heard much of Jesus through the word of her maid-in-waiting, who was a Phoenician believer in the gospel of the kingdom. After the death of Pilate, Claudia became prominently identified with the spread of the good news.

 

(1989.2)185:1.8 And all this explains much that transpired on this tragic Friday forenoon. It is easy to understand why the Jews presumed to dictate to Pilate — to get him up at six o’clock to try Jesus — and also why they did not hesitate to threaten to charge him with treason before the emperor if he dared to refuse their demands for Jesus’ death.

 

(1989.3)185:1.9 A worthy Roman governor who had not become disadvantageously involved with the rulers of the Jews would never have permitted these bloodthirsty religious fanatics to bring about the death of a man whom he himself had declared to be innocent of their false charges and without fault. Rome made a great blunder, a far-reaching error in earthly affairs, when she sent the second-rate Pilate to govern Palestine. Tiberius had better have sent to the Jews the best provincial administrator in the empire.

 

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#4 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 12 September 2014 - 04:46 AM


.

 

Greetings Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

So! Tiberias was partially at fault in the Master's death for assigning the "second rate" Pilate to rule the Jews. From the last line of today's reading:
 

...Tiberius had better have sent to the Jews the best provincial administrator in the empire.... (1989.3)185:1.9

 

But would Jesus' death have been any better? Any different? Maybe, but it seems to me that the Universal Father had a point to make with this Urantian incarnation, about his willingness to suffer what many humans have to, rank unfairness and mob injustice--through his son of course.

 

 

Secular history now affirms (since 1961 and the discovery of the Pilate Stone) Pilate was a real person. And it confirms many of the facts presented in today's text. From Wikipedia:
 

Pontius Pilate was the fifth prefect of the Roman province of Judaea, from AD 26–36. He served under Emperor Tiberius, and is best known for presiding over the trial of Jesus and ordering his crucifixion.

 

The sources for Pilate's life are an inscription known as the Pilate Stone, which confirms his historicity and establishes his title as prefect; a brief mention by Tacitus; Philo of Alexandria; Josephus; the four canonical gospels; the Gospel of Nicodemus; the Gospel of Marcion; and other apocryphal works. Based on these sources, it appears that Pilate was an equestrian of the Pontii family, and succeeded Valerius Gratus as prefect of Judaea in AD 26. Once in his post he offended the religious sensibilities of his subjects, leading to harsh criticism from Philo and Josephus.

 

According to Josephus, he was ordered back to Rome after harshly suppressing a Samaritan uprising, arriving just after the death of Tiberius, which occurred on 16 March in AD 37. He was replaced by Marcellus.

 

In all four gospel accounts, Pilate lobbies for Jesus to be spared his eventual fate of execution, and acquiesces only when the crowd refused to relent. He thus seeks to avoid personal responsibility for the death of Jesus. In the Gospel of Matthew, Pilate washes his hands to show that he was not responsible for the execution of Jesus and reluctantly sends him to his death. The Gospel of Mark, depicting Jesus as innocent of plotting against the Roman Empire, portrays Pilate as reluctant to execute Jesus. In the Gospel of Luke, Pilate not only agrees that Jesus did not conspire against Rome, but Herod Antipas, the Tetrarch of Galilee, also finds nothing treasonable in Jesus' actions. In the Gospel of John, Pilate states “I find no guilt in him [Jesus],” and he asks the Jews if Jesus should be released from custody.

 

Scholars have long debated how to interpret Pilate's portrayal in the sources. The significance of the Pilate Stone, an artifact discovered in 1961 that names Pontius Pilate, is similarly debated by scholars.

 

The Pilate Stone:

1280px-Pontius_Pilate_Inscription.JPG

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

The Pilate Stone is the name given to a damaged block (82 cm x 65 cm) of carved limestone with a partially intact inscription attributed to, and mentioning, Pontius Pilate; a Prefect of the Roman-controlled province of Judaea from 26–36 AD. It was discovered in the archaeological site of Caesarea Maritima, in 1961. The artifact is particularly significant because it is the only widely accepted archaeological find, to date, of an authentic 1st-century Roman inscription mentioning the name "Pontius Pilatus". It is contemporary to Pilate's lifetime, and accords with what is known of his reported career. In effect, the writing constitutes the earliest surviving record and only contemporaneous evidence for the historical existence of this person; otherwise known only from the New Testament and brief mentions in retrospective Roman histories, which have themselves survived only in still-later copies.

 

It is likely that Pontius Pilate made his base at Caesarea Maritima (the "governmental residence and military headquarters" beginning in 6 AD) where the stone was discovered, and travelled to Jerusalem as necessary.

 

The Pilate Stone is currently located at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. Replica castings can be found at the Archaeological Museum in Milan, Italy, and on display in Caesarea Maritima itself.

 

 

Pilate in Jewish literature

 

In chronicling the history of the Roman administrators in Judaea, ancient Jewish writers Philo and Josephus describe some of the other events and incidents that took place during Pilate's tenure. Both report that Pilate repeatedly caused near-insurrections among the Jews because of his insensitivity to Jewish customs.

 

Josephus notes that while Pilate's predecessors had respected Jewish customs by removing all images and effigies on their standards when entering Jerusalem, Pilate allowed his soldiers to bring them into the city at night. When the citizens of Jerusalem discovered these the following day, they appealed to Pilate to remove the ensigns of Caesar from the city. After five days of deliberation, Pilate had his soldiers surround the demonstrators, threatening them with death, which they were willing to accept rather than submit to desecration of Mosaic law. Pilate finally removed the images.

 

Philo describes a later, similar incident in which Pilate was chastened by Emperor Tiberius after antagonizing the Jews by setting up gold-coated shields in Herod's Palace in Jerusalem. The shields were ostensibly to honor Tiberius, and this time did not contain engraved images. Philo writes that the shields were set up "not so much to honour Tiberius as to annoy the multitude". The Jews protested the installation of the shields at first to Pilate, and then, when he declined to remove them, by writing to Tiberius. Philo reports that upon reading the letters, Tiberius "wrote to Pilate with a host of reproaches and rebukes for his audacious violation of precedent and bade him at once take down the shields and have them transferred from the capital to Caesarea."

 

Josephus recounts another incident in which Pilate spent money from the Temple to build an aqueduct. Pilate had soldiers hidden in the crowd of Jews while addressing them and, when Jews again protested his actions he gave the signal for his soldiers to randomly attack, beat and kill – in an attempt to silence Jewish petitions.

 

In describing his personality, Philo writes that Pilate had "vindictiveness and furious temper", and was "naturally inflexible, a blend of self-will and relentlessness". He writes that Pilate feared a delegation of the Jews might send to Tiberius protesting the gold-coated shields, because "if they actually sent an embassy they would also expose the rest of his conduct as governor by stating in full the briberies, the insults, the robberies, the outrages and wanton injuries, the executions without trial constantly repeated, the ceaseless and supremely grievous cruelty".

 

Pilate's term as prefect of Judaea ended after an incident recounted by Josephus. A large group of Samaritans had been persuaded by an unnamed man to go to Mount Gerizim in order to see sacred artifacts allegedly buried by Moses. But at a village named Tirathana, before the crowd could ascend the mountain, Pilate sent in "a detachment of cavalry and heavy-armed infantry, who in an encounter with the firstcomers in the village slew some in a pitched battle and put the others to flight. Many prisoners were taken, of whom Pilate put to death the principal leaders and those who were most influential."

 

The Samaritans then complained to Vitellius, Roman governor of Syria, who sent Pilate to Rome to explain his actions regarding this incident to Tiberius. However, by the time Pilate got to Rome, Tiberius had died.

 

SOURCE/MORE

 

 

James_Tissot_Pontius_Pilate_350.jpg

IMAGE SOURCE




***

 

In tomorrow’s reading, Section 2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate, the Sanhedrists propound Jesus' guilt on the steps of the governor's palace, and then specify their three accusations against him in writing. The Master looks down on this scene, not with hatred, contempt, or anger, but with "sorrowful affection and genuine pity".

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate
2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#5 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 13 September 2014 - 04:26 AM


Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

 

   When Jesus and his accusers had gathered in front of Pilate’s judgment hall, the Roman governor came out and, addressing the company assembled, asked, “What accusation do you bring against this fellow?” The Sadducees and councilors who had taken it upon themselves to put Jesus out of the way had determined to go before Pilate and ask for confirmation of the death sentence pronounced upon Jesus, without volunteering any definite charge. Therefore did the spokesman for the Sanhedrist court answer Pilate: “If this man were not an evildoer, we should not have delivered him up to you.”

 

(1989.5)185:2.2 When Pilate observed that they were reluctant to state their charges against Jesus, although he knew they had been all night engaged in deliberations regarding his guilt, he answered them: “Since you have not agreed on any definite charges, why do you not take this man and pass judgment on him in accordance with your own laws?”

 

(1989.6)185:2.3 Then spoke the clerk of the Sanhedrin court to Pilate: “It is not lawful for us to put any man to death, and this disturber of our nation is worthy to die for the things which he has said and done. Therefore have we come before you for confirmation of this decree.”

 

(1989.7)185:2.4 To come before the Roman governor with this attempt at evasion discloses both the ill-will and the ill-humor of the Sanhedrists toward Jesus as well as their lack of respect for the fairness, honor, and dignity of Pilate. What effrontery for these subject citizens to appear before their provincial governor asking for a decree of execution against a man before affording him a fair trial and without even preferring definite criminal charges against him!

 

(1989.8)185:2.5 Pilate knew something of Jesus’ work among the Jews, and he surmised that the charges which might be brought against him had to do with infringements of the Jewish ecclesiastical laws; therefore he sought to refer the case back to their own tribunal. Again, Pilate took delight in making them publicly confess that they were powerless to pronounce and execute the death sentence upon even one of their own race whom they had come to despise with a bitter and envious hatred.

 

(1990.1)185:2.6 It was a few hours previously, shortly before midnight and after he had granted permission to use Roman soldiers in effecting the secret arrest of Jesus, that Pilate had heard further concerning Jesus and his teaching from his wife, Claudia, who was a partial convert to Judaism, and who later on became a full-fledged believer in Jesus’ gospel.

 

(1990.2)185:2.7 Pilate would have liked to postpone this hearing, but he saw the Jewish leaders were determined to proceed with the case. He knew that this was not only the forenoon of preparation for the Passover, but that this day, being Friday, was also the preparation day for the Jewish Sabbath of rest and worship.

 

(1990.3)185:2.8 Pilate, being keenly sensitive to the disrespectful manner of the approach of these Jews, was not willing to comply with their demands that Jesus be sentenced to death without a trial. When, therefore, he had waited a few moments for them to present their charges against the prisoner, he turned to them and said: “I will not sentence this man to death without a trial; neither will I consent to examine him until you have presented your charges against him in writing.”

 

(1990.4)185:2.9 When the high priest and the others heard Pilate say this, they signaled to the clerk of the court, who then handed to Pilate the written charges against Jesus. And these charges were:

(1990.5)185:2.10 “We find in the Sanhedrist tribunal that this man is an evildoer and a disturber of our nation in that he is guilty of:

 

 “1. Perverting our nation and stirring up our people to rebellion.

 “2. Forbidding the people to pay tribute to Caesar.

 “3. Calling himself the king of the Jews and teaching the founding of a new kingdom.”

 

(1990.9)185:2.14 Jesus had not been regularly tried nor legally convicted on any of these charges. He did not even hear these charges when first stated, but Pilate had him brought from the praetorium, where he was in the keeping of the guards, and he insisted that these charges be repeated in Jesus’ hearing.

 

(1990.10)185:2.15 When Jesus heard these accusations, he well knew that he had not been heard on these matters before the Jewish court, and so did John Zebedee and his accusers, but he made no reply to their false charges. Even when Pilate bade him answer his accusers, he opened not his mouth. Pilate was so astonished at the unfairness of the whole proceeding and so impressed by Jesus’ silent and masterly bearing that he decided to take the prisoner inside the hall and examine him privately.

 

(1990.11)185:2.16 Pilate was confused in mind, fearful of the Jews in his heart, and mightily stirred in his spirit by the spectacle of Jesus’ standing there in majesty before his bloodthirsty accusers and gazing down on them, not in silent contempt, but with an expression of genuine pity and sorrowful affection.

 

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#6 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 13 September 2014 - 05:11 AM


.

 

Good Day Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

He may be a moral coward, but Pilate seems not to have lost all feeling, all sense of what is fair and just. From today's reading:


...Pilate was so astonished at the unfairness of the whole proceeding and so impressed by Jesus’ silent and masterly bearing that he decided to take the prisoner inside the hall and examine him privately.... (1990.10)185:2.15
 

Of course, in the end, Pilate was blinded by his pride and status, and cowed by the howling heathen hoard on his porch. Defending Jesus wasn't worth sacrificing his position and income.

 

One has to wonder if Pilate survived. If he did, he surely regretted not taking a stand against those hate-filled Sanhedrists when he had the chance. In fact he had more than one chance, but took the coward's way out each time.

 

His wife, on the other hand, not only believed Jesus' message, she joined his followers! (We will read about her attempt to save Jesus in Section 5 of this Paper.) She is referred to in the Gospel of Matthew, but not by name.

 

From Wikipedia:
 

In the New Testament, the only reference to Pilate's wife exists in a single sentence by Matthew. According to Matthew 27:19, she sent a message to her husband asking him not to condemn Jesus Christ to death:

 

...While Pilate was sitting in the judgment hall, his wife sent him a message: "Have nothing to do with that innocent man, because in a dream last night, I suffered much on account of him."

 

Pilate did not heed the warning of his wife, who is not named. The name "Claudia" appears only once in the New Testament, in the Second Epistle to Timothy 4:21: "Eubulus, Pudens, Linus and Claudia send their greetings, and so all the other Christians."

 

The Catholics sainted her:


Pontius_Pilate%27s_wife.jpg

Icon of Saint Claudia Procles

 

***

 

This appearance before Pilate has several references in the New Testament.

 

From Mark 15:

 

1 And straightway in the morning the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered him to Pilate.
 

From Matthew 27:

 

12 And when he was accused of the chief priests and elders, he answered nothing.


From Luke 23:
 

1 And the whole multitude of them arose, and led him unto Pilate.

And they began to accuse him, saying, We found this fellow perverting the nation, and forbidding to give tribute to Caesar, saying that he himself is Christ a King.


From John 18:

 

29 Pilate then went out unto them, and said, What accusation bring ye against this man?

30 They answered and said unto him, If he were not a malefactor, we would not have delivered him up unto thee.

31 Then said Pilate unto them, Take ye him, and judge him according to your law. The Jews therefore said unto him, It is not lawful for us to put any man to death:

 

 

William_Hole_Jesus_Before_Pilate_400.jpg

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

***

 

Tomorrow’s reading, Section 3. The Private Examination by Pilate, tells of an indoor interview with Jesus, John ever at his side. Pilate decides Jesus is innocent, but the Sanhedrists protest vehemently. Pilate then thinks he may be able to shift the adjudication of this affair onto a neighboring governor, Herod of Galilee.

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate
2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#7 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 14 September 2014 - 04:20 AM


Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

 

 

   Pilate took Jesus and John Zebedee into a private chamber, leaving the guards outside in the hall, and requesting the prisoner to sit down, he sat down by his side and asked several questions. Pilate began his talk with Jesus by assuring him that he did not believe the first count against him: that he was a perverter of the nation and an inciter to rebellion. Then he asked, “Did you ever teach that tribute should be refused Caesar?” Jesus, pointing to John, said, “Ask him or any other man who has heard my teaching.” Then Pilate questioned John about this matter of tribute, and John testified concerning his Master’s teaching and explained that Jesus and his apostles paid taxes both to Caesar and to the temple. When Pilate had questioned John, he said, “See that you tell no man that I talked with you.” And John never did reveal this matter.

 

(1991.2)185:3.2 Pilate then turned around to question Jesus further, saying: “And now about the third accusation against you, are you the king of the Jews?” Since there was a tone of possibly sincere inquiry in Pilate’s voice, Jesus smiled on the procurator and said: “Pilate, do you ask this for yourself, or do you take this question from these others, my accusers?” Whereupon, in a tone of partial indignation, the governor answered: “Am I a Jew? Your own people and the chief priests delivered you up and asked me to sentence you to death. I question the validity of their charges and am only trying to find out for myself what you have done. Tell me, have you said that you are the king of the Jews, and have you sought to found a new kingdom?”

 

(1991.3)185:3.3 Then said Jesus to Pilate: “Do you not perceive that my kingdom is not of this world? If my kingdom were of this world, surely would my disciples fight that I should not be delivered into the hands of the Jews. My presence here before you in these bonds is sufficient to show all men that my kingdom is a spiritual dominion, even the brotherhood of men who, through faith and by love, have become the sons of God. And this salvation is for the gentile as well as for the Jew.”

 

(1991.4)185:3.4 “Then you are a king after all?” said Pilate. And Jesus answered: “Yes, I am such a king, and my kingdom is the family of the faith sons of my Father who is in heaven. For this purpose was I born into this world, even that I should show my Father to all men and bear witness to the truth of God. And even now do I declare to you that every one who loves the truth hears my voice.”

 

(1991.5)185:3.5 Then said Pilate, half in ridicule and half in sincerity, “Truth, what is truth — who knows?”

 

(1991.6)185:3.6 Pilate was not able to fathom Jesus’ words, nor was he able to understand the nature of his spiritual kingdom, but he was now certain that the prisoner had done nothing worthy of death. One look at Jesus, face to face, was enough to convince even Pilate that this gentle and weary, but majestic and upright, man was no wild and dangerous revolutionary who aspired to establish himself on the temporal throne of Israel. Pilate thought he understood something of what Jesus meant when he called himself a king, for he was familiar with the teachings of the Stoics, who declared that “the wise man is king.” Pilate was thoroughly convinced that, instead of being a dangerous seditionmonger, Jesus was nothing more or less than a harmless visionary, an innocent fanatic.

 

(1991.7)185:3.7 After questioning the Master, Pilate went back to the chief priests and the accusers of Jesus and said: “I have examined this man, and I find no fault in him. I do not think he is guilty of the charges you have made against him; I think he ought to be set free.” And when the Jews heard this, they were moved with great anger, so much so that they wildly shouted that Jesus should die; and one of the Sanhedrists boldly stepped up by the side of Pilate, saying: “This man stirs up the people, beginning in Galilee and continuing throughout all Judea. He is a mischief-maker and an evildoer. You will long regret it if you let this wicked man go free.”

 

(1992.1)185:3.8 Pilate was hard pressed to know what to do with Jesus; therefore, when he heard them say that he began his work in Galilee, he thought to avoid the responsibility of deciding the case, at least to gain time for thought, by sending Jesus to appear before Herod, who was then in the city attending the Passover. Pilate also thought that this gesture would help to antidote some of the bitter feeling which had existed for some time between himself and Herod, due to numerous misunderstandings over matters of jurisdiction.

 

(1992.2)185:3.9 Pilate, calling the guards, said: “This man is a Galilean. Take him forthwith to Herod, and when he has examined him, report his findings to me.” And they took Jesus to Herod.

 

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#8 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 14 September 2014 - 04:24 AM


.

 

Greetings Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

Hmm...Why did Pilate make this request?


"...See that you tell no man that I talked with you.” And John never did reveal this matter.... (1991.1)185:3.1
 

 

***

 

The irony of this statement from Pilate would be humorous if the situation were not so deadly and evil:
 

...Then said Pilate, half in ridicule and half in sincerity, “Truth, what is truth — who knows?” (1991.5)185:3.5

 

The Living Truth of a universe was in Pilate's presence and he asks: What is truth?

 

William_Hole_Art_Thou_King_Of_The_Jews_4

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

Some sources attribute this quote in today's reading:
 

...he was familiar with the teachings of the Stoics, who declared that “the wise man is king....” (1991.6)185:3.6


...to Zeno of Elea, others to Clement of Alexandria:
 

...And this arrangement was prophetical and typical. And that all things belong to the wise, Scripture clearly indicates when it is said, "Because God hath had mercy on me, I have all things." For it teaches that we are to desire one thing, by which are all things, and what is promised is assigned to the worthy. Accordingly, the good man who has become heir of the kingdom, it registers also as fellow-citizen, through divine wisdom, with the righteous of the olden time, who under the law and before the law lived according to law, whose deeds have become laws to us; and again, teaching that the wise man is king, introduces people of a different race, saying to him, "Thou art a king before God among us;" those who were governed obeying the good man of their own accord, from admiration of his virtue.

 

Source/more

 

***

 

The four Gospel records all have something about this interview. As it should be, John has the most and is the closest to the facts. The editors of the other three must have copied John since he was the only one there.

From John 18:

 

33 Then Pilate entered into the judgment hall again, and called Jesus, and said unto him, Art thou the King of the Jews?

34 Jesus answered him, Sayest thou this thing of thyself, or did others tell it thee of me?

35 Pilate answered, Am I a Jew? Thine own nation and the chief priests have delivered thee unto me: what hast thou done?

36 Jesus answered, My kingdom is not of this world: if my kingdom were of this world, then would my servants fight, that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now is my kingdom not from hence.

37 Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice.

38 Pilate saith unto him, What is truth? And when he had said this, he went out again unto the Jews, and saith unto them, I find in him no fault at all.


From Mark 15:
 

And Pilate asked him, Art thou the King of the Jews? And he answering said unto them, Thou sayest it.

And the chief priests accused him of many things: but he answered nothing.

And Pilate asked him again, saying, Answerest thou nothing? behold how many things they witness against thee.

But Jesus yet answered nothing; so that Pilate marvelled.


From Luke 23:
 

And Pilate asked him, saying, Art thou the King of the Jews? And he answered him and said, Thou sayest it.

Then said Pilate to the chief priests and to the people, I find no fault in this man.

And they were the more fierce, saying, He stirreth up the people, teaching throughout all Jewry, beginning from Galilee to this place.

When Pilate heard of Galilee, he asked whether the man were a Galilaean.

And as soon as he knew that he belonged unto Herod's jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who himself also was at Jerusalem at that time.

 

From Matthew 27:
 

11 And Jesus stood before the governor: and the governor asked him, saying, Art thou the King of the Jews? And Jesus said unto him, Thou sayest.

12 And when he was accused of the chief priests and elders, he answered nothing.

13 Then said Pilate unto him, Hearest thou not how many things they witness against thee?

14 And he answered him to never a word; insomuch that the governor marvelled greatly.



***

 

Tomorrow’s reading, Section 4. Jesus Before Herod, is mostly about Jesus' silence before the Galilean governor, who does nothing but question and ridicule the Master, then sends him back to Pilate in an old robe as a mock king.

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate
2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#9 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 15 September 2014 - 05:18 AM


Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

4. Jesus Before Herod

 

   When Herod Antipas stopped in Jerusalem, he dwelt in the old Maccabean palace of Herod the Great, and it was to this home of the former king that Jesus was now taken by the temple guards, and he was followed by his accusers and an increasing multitude. Herod had long heard of Jesus, and he was very curious about him. When the Son of Man stood before him, on this Friday morning, the wicked Idumean never for one moment recalled the lad of former years who had appeared before him in Sepphoris pleading for a just decision regarding the money due his father, who had been accidentally killed while at work on one of the public buildings. As far as Herod knew, he had never seen Jesus, although he had worried a great deal about him when his work had been centered in Galilee. Now that he was in custody of Pilate and the Judeans, Herod was desirous of seeing him, feeling secure against any trouble from him in the future. Herod had heard much about the miracles wrought by Jesus, and he really hoped to see him do some wonder.

 

(1992.4)185:4.2 When they brought Jesus before Herod, the tetrarch was startled by his stately appearance and the calm composure of his countenance. For some fifteen minutes Herod asked Jesus questions, but the Master would not answer. Herod taunted and dared him to perform a miracle, but Jesus would not reply to his many inquiries or respond to his taunts.

 

(1992.5)185:4.3 Then Herod turned to the chief priests and the Sadducees and, giving ear to their accusations, heard all and more than Pilate had listened to regarding the alleged evil doings of the Son of Man. Finally, being convinced that Jesus would neither talk nor perform a wonder for him, Herod, after making fun of him for a time, arrayed him in an old purple royal robe and sent him back to Pilate. Herod knew he had no jurisdiction over Jesus in Judea. Though he was glad to believe that he was finally to be rid of Jesus in Galilee, he was thankful that it was Pilate who had the responsibility of putting him to death. Herod never had fully recovered from the fear that cursed him as a result of killing John the Baptist. Herod had at certain times even feared that Jesus was John risen from the dead. Now he was relieved of that fear since he observed that Jesus was a very different sort of person from the outspoken and fiery prophet who dared to expose and denounce his private life.

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#10 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 15 September 2014 - 05:23 AM

.

Good Day Alina, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

The first line of today’s reading cites the “old Maccabean palace”:

 

map-35-735px.jpg?1402517981

MAP SOURCE

 

And this story in today’s text:

 

…the wicked Idumean never for one moment recalled the lad of former years who had appeared before him in Sepphoris pleading for a just decision regarding the money due his father…. (1992.3)185:4.1

 

…first appeared in Paper 126:

 

The great shock of his fifteenth year came when Jesus went over to Sepphoris to receive the decision of Herod regarding the appeal taken to him in the dispute about the amount of money due Joseph at the time of his accidental death. Jesus and Mary had hoped for the receipt of a considerable sum of money when the treasurer at Sepphoris had offered them a paltry amount. Joseph’s brothers had taken an appeal to Herod himself, and now Jesus stood in the palace and heard Herod decree that his father had nothing due him at the time of his death. And for such an unjust decision Jesus never again trusted Herod Antipas. It is not surprising that he once alluded to Herod as “that fox….” (1393.4)126:5.7

 

Andrea_Schiavone_Christ_With_Herod_525.j

IMAGE SOURCE

 

From the secular point of view, Herod was indeed one of the tetrarchs of Galilee during the Master’s life. From Wikipedia:

 

Herod Antipater (Greek: born before 20 BC – died after 39 AD), known by the nickname Antipas, was a 1st-century ruler of Galilee and Perea, who bore the title of tetrarch (“ruler of a quarter”). He is best known today for accounts in the New Testament of his role in events that led to the executions of John the Baptist and Jesus of Nazareth.

 

After being named to the throne by Caesar Augustus upon the death of his father, Herod the Great, in 4 BC, and subsequent Ethnarch rule by his brother, Herod Archelaus, Antipas ruled them as a client state of the Roman Empire. He was responsible for building projects at Sepphoris and Betharamphtha, and more important for the construction of his capital Tiberias on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee. Named in honor of his patron, the emperor Tiberius, the city later became a center of rabbinic learning.

 

Antipas divorced his first wife Phasaelis, the daughter of King Aretas IV of Nabatea, in favour of Herodias, who had formerly been married to his brother Herod Philip I. (Antipas was Herod the Great’s son by Malthace, while Herod II was his son by Mariamne II.) According to the New Testament Gospels, it was John the Baptist’s condemnation of this arrangement that led Antipas to have him arrested; John was subsequently put to death. Besides provoking his conflict with the Baptizer, the tetrarch’s divorce added a personal grievance to previous disputes with Aretas over territory on the border of Perea and Nabatea. The result was a war that proved disastrous for Antipas; a Roman counter-offensive was ordered by Tiberius, but abandoned upon that emperor’s death in 37 AD. In 39 AD Antipas was accused by his nephew Agrippa I of conspiracy against the new Roman emperor Caligula, who sent him into exile in Gaul. Accompanied there by Herodias, he died at an unknown date.

 

The Gospel of Luke states that Jesus was first brought before Pontius Pilate for trial, since Pilate was the governor of Roman Judea, which encompassed Jerusalem where Jesus was arrested. Pilate initially handed him over to Antipas, in whose territory Jesus had been most active, but Antipas sent him back to Pilate’s court.

 

SOURCE/MORE

 

Strangely, in the Biblical account only Luke recorded this meeting with Herod, in chapter 23:

 

And as soon as he knew that he belonged unto Herod’s jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod, who himself also was at Jerusalem at that time.

And when Herod saw Jesus, he was exceeding glad: for he was desirous to see him of a long season, because he had heard many things of him; and he hoped to have seen some miracle done by him.

Then he questioned with him in many words; but he answered him nothing.

10 And the chief priests and scribes stood and vehemently accused him.

11 And Herod with his men of war set him at nought, and mocked him, and arrayed him in a gorgeous robe, and sent him again to Pilate.

 

Jesus-och-Herodes.jpg

Jesus before Herod Antipas, Albrecht Dürer, 1509

IMAGE SOURCE

 

From today’s reading:

 

…Herod, after making fun of him for a time, arrayed him in an old purple royal robe and sent him back to Pilate…. (1992.5)185:4.3

 

jesus-christ-wearing-a-scarlet-robe-befo

IMAGE SOURCE

***

 

In tomorrow’s reading, Section 5. Jesus Returns to Pilate, an ugly, viscous scene unfolds on the steps of the praetorium as Pilate pleads with the men demanding Jesus’ crucifixion, once more decrying his innocence, even suggesting that Jesus be released in the traditional Passover pardon, instead of the criminal Barabbas, to no avail.

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate

2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#11 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 16 September 2014 - 04:24 AM


Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

 

   When the guards had brought Jesus back to Pilate, he went out on the front steps of the praetorium, where his judgment seat had been placed, and calling together the chief priests and Sanhedrists, said to them: “You brought this man before me with charges that he perverts the people, forbids the payment of taxes, and claims to be king of the Jews. I have examined him and fail to find him guilty of these charges. In fact, I find no fault in him. Then I sent him to Herod, and the tetrarch must have reached the same conclusion since he has sent him back to us. Certainly, nothing worthy of death has been done by this man. If you still think he needs to be disciplined, I am willing to chastise him before I release him.”

 

(1993.2)185:5.2 Just as the Jews were about to engage in shouting their protests against the release of Jesus, a vast crowd came marching up to the praetorium for the purpose of asking Pilate for the release of a prisoner in honor of the Passover feast. For some time it had been the custom of the Roman governors to allow the populace to choose some imprisoned or condemned man for pardon at the time of the Passover. And now that this crowd had come before him to ask for the release of a prisoner, and since Jesus had so recently been in great favor with the multitudes, it occurred to Pilate that he might possibly extricate himself from his predicament by proposing to this group that, since Jesus was now a prisoner before his judgment seat, he release to them this man of Galilee as the token of Passover good will.

 

(1993.3)185:5.3 As the crowd surged up on the steps of the building, Pilate heard them calling out the name of one Barabbas. Barabbas was a noted political agitator and murderous robber, the son of a priest, who had recently been apprehended in the act of robbery and murder on the Jericho road. This man was under sentence to die as soon as the Passover festivities were over.

 

(1993.4)185:5.4 Pilate stood up and explained to the crowd that Jesus had been brought to him by the chief priests, who sought to have him put to death on certain charges, and that he did not think the man was worthy of death. Said Pilate: “Which, therefore, would you prefer that I release to you, this Barabbas, the murderer, or this Jesus of Galilee?” And when Pilate had thus spoken, the chief priests and the Sanhedrin councilors all shouted at the top of their voices, “Barabbas, Barabbas!” And when the people saw that the chief priests were minded to have Jesus put to death, they quickly joined in the clamor for his life while they loudly shouted for the release of Barabbas.

 

(1993.5)185:5.5 A few days before this the multitude had stood in awe of Jesus, but the mob did not look up to one who, having claimed to be the Son of God, now found himself in the custody of the chief priests and the rulers and on trial before Pilate for his life. Jesus could be a hero in the eyes of the populace when he was driving the money-changers and the traders out of the temple, but not when he was a nonresisting prisoner in the hands of his enemies and on trial for his life.

 

(1993.6)185:5.6 Pilate was angered at the sight of the chief priests clamoring for the pardon of a notorious murderer while they shouted for the blood of Jesus. He saw their malice and hatred and perceived their prejudice and envy. Therefore he said to them: “How could you choose the life of a murderer in preference to this man’s whose worst crime is that he figuratively calls himself the king of the Jews?” But this was not a wise statement for Pilate to make. The Jews were a proud people, now subject to the Roman political yoke but hoping for the coming of a Messiah who would deliver them from gentile bondage with a great show of power and glory. They resented, more than Pilate could know, the intimation that this meek-mannered teacher of strange doctrines, now under arrest and charged with crimes worthy of death, should be referred to as “the king of the Jews.” They looked upon such a remark as an insult to everything which they held sacred and honorable in their national existence, and therefore did they all let loose their mighty shouts for Barabbas’s release and Jesus’ death.

 

(1994.1)185:5.7 Pilate knew Jesus was innocent of the charges brought against him, and had he been a just and courageous judge, he would have acquitted him and turned him loose. But he was afraid to defy these angry Jews, and while he hesitated to do his duty, a messenger came up and presented him with a sealed message from his wife, Claudia.

 

(1994.2)185:5.8 Pilate indicated to those assembled before him that he wished to read the communication which he had just received before he proceeded further with the matter before him. When Pilate opened this letter from his wife, he read: “I pray you have nothing to do with this innocent and just man whom they call Jesus. I have suffered many things in a dream this night because of him.” This note from Claudia not only greatly upset Pilate and thereby delayed the adjudication of this matter, but it unfortunately also provided considerable time in which the Jewish rulers freely circulated among the crowd and urged the people to call for the release of Barabbas and to clamor for the crucifixion of Jesus.

 

(1994.3)185:5.9 Finally, Pilate addressed himself once more to the solution of the problem which confronted him, by asking the mixed assembly of Jewish rulers and the pardon-seeking crowd, “What shall I do with him who is called the king of the Jews?” And they all shouted with one accord, “Crucify him! Crucify him!” The unanimity of this demand from the mixed multitude startled and alarmed Pilate, the unjust and fear-ridden judge.

 

(1994.4)185:5.10 Then once more Pilate said: “Why would you crucify this man? What evil has he done? Who will come forward to testify against him?” But when they heard Pilate speak in defense of Jesus, they only cried out all the more, “Crucify him! Crucify him!”

 

(1994.5)185:5.11 Then again Pilate appealed to them regarding the release of the Passover prisoner, saying: “Once more I ask you, which of these prisoners shall I release to you at this, your Passover time?” And again the crowd shouted, “Give us Barabbas!”

 

(1994.6)185:5.12 Then said Pilate: “If I release the murderer, Barabbas, what shall I do with Jesus?” And once more the multitude shouted in unison, “Crucify him! Crucify him!”

 

(1994.7)185:5.13 Pilate was terrorized by the insistent clamor of the mob, acting under the direct leadership of the chief priests and the councilors of the Sanhedrin; nevertheless, he decided upon at least one more attempt to appease the crowd and save Jesus.

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#12 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 16 September 2014 - 05:23 AM


.

Greetings Alina, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

So, Pilate declares him completely and totally innocent, but if the raging mob has to see some blood, let's whip him a bit. It would be funny if not so sickeningly unfair, unjust and monumentally wrong!

 

"...If you still think he needs to be disciplined, I am willing to chastise him before I release him.” (1993.1)185:5.1

 

 

And what a strange custom to release a properly convicted prisoner, especially a murdering thief like Barabbas. Maybe it was the "political agitator" part that appealed to this blood thirsty, Roman-loathing crowd. From today's text:
 

 ...Barabbas was a noted political agitator and murderous robber, the son of a priest, who had recently been apprehended in the act of robbery and murder.... (1993.3)185:5.3

 

How quickly they turn:
 

...Jesus could be a hero in the eyes of the populace when he was driving the money-changers and the traders out of the temple, but not when he was a nonresisting prisoner in the hands of his enemies.... (1993.5)185:5.5



After her dream Claudia tried to stop his execution, God bless her. Curiously only Matthew recorded her attempted intervention, in chapter 27:

 

15 Now at that feast the governor was wont to release unto the people a prisoner, whom they would.

16 And they had then a notable prisoner, called Barabbas.

17 Therefore when they were gathered together, Pilate said unto them, Whom will ye that I release unto you? Barabbas, or Jesus which is called Christ?

18 For he knew that for envy they had delivered him.

19 When he was set down on the judgment seat, his wife sent unto him, saying, Have thou nothing to do with that just man: for I have suffered many things this day in a dream because of him.

20 But the chief priests and elders persuaded the multitude that they should ask Barabbas, and destroy Jesus.

21 The governor answered and said unto them, Whether of the twain will ye that I release unto you? They said, Barabbas.

22 Pilate saith unto them, What shall I do then with Jesus which is called Christ? They all say unto him, Let him be crucified.

23 And the governor said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified.


The other three Gospels record this much. From Luke 23:

 

13 And Pilate, when he had called together the chief priests and the rulers and the people,

14 Said unto them, Ye have brought this man unto me, as one that perverteth the people: and, behold, I, having examined him before you, have found no fault in this man touching those things whereof ye accuse him:

15 No, nor yet Herod: for I sent you to him; and, lo, nothing worthy of death is done unto him.

16 I will therefore chastise him, and release him.

17 (For of necessity he must release one unto them at the feast.)

18 And they cried out all at once, saying, Away with this man, and release unto us Barabbas:

19 (Who for a certain sedition made in the city, and for murder, was cast into prison.)

20 Pilate therefore, willing to release Jesus, spake again to them.

21 But they cried, saying, Crucify him, crucify him.

22 And he said unto them the third time, Why, what evil hath he done? I have found no cause of death in him: I will therefore chastise him, and let him go.

23 And they were instant with loud voices, requiring that he might be crucified. And the voices of them and of the chief priests prevailed.


From Mark 15:

 

Now at that feast he released unto them one prisoner, whomsoever they desired.

And there was one named Barabbas, which lay bound with them that had made insurrection with him, who had committed murder in the insurrection.

And the multitude crying aloud began to desire him to do as he had ever done unto them.

But Pilate answered them, saying, Will ye that I release unto you the King of the Jews?

10 For he knew that the chief priests had delivered him for envy.

11 But the chief priests moved the people, that he should rather release Barabbas unto them.

12 And Pilate answered and said again unto them, What will ye then that I shall do unto him whom ye call the King of the Jews?

13 And they cried out again, Crucify him.

14 Then Pilate said unto them, Why, what evil hath he done? And they cried out the more exceedingly, Crucify him.


 

John's Gospel record is choppy and out of order, but there is this much in chapters 18 & 19:

 

39 But ye have a custom, that I should release unto you one at the passover: will ye therefore that I release unto you the King of the Jews?

40 Then cried they all again, saying, Not this man, but Barabbas. Now Barabbas was a robber.


 

12 And from thenceforth Pilate sought to release him: but the Jews cried out, saying, If thou let this man go, thou art not Caesar's friend: whosoever maketh himself a king speaketh against Caesar.

13 When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he brought Jesus forth, and sat down in the judgment seat in a place that is called the Pavement, but in the Hebrew, Gabbatha.

14 And it was the preparation of the passover, and about the sixth hour: and he saith unto the Jews, Behold your King!

15 But they cried out, Away with him, away with him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests answered, We have no king but Caesar.

 

 

Mihaly_Munkacsy_Christ_before_Pilate_525

IMAGE SOURCE

 

***

 

In tomorrow’s reading, Section 6. Pilate’s Last Appeal, the most unfair and unjust punishment so far is heaped upon the unresisting prisoner, he is whipped until Pilate can stand no more, then led back inside for one last interview with the cowardly ruler, now wracked by a dual fear of both releasing and condemning the Master.

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate

2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#13 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 17 September 2014 - 04:24 AM


Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

 

   In all that is transpiring early this Friday morning before Pilate, only the enemies of Jesus are participating. His many friends either do not yet know of his night arrest and early morning trial or are in hiding lest they also be apprehended and adjudged worthy of death because they believe Jesus’ teachings. In the multitude which now clamors for the Master’s death are to be found only his sworn enemies and the easily led and unthinking populace.

 

(1995.1)185:6.2 Pilate would make one last appeal to their pity. Being afraid to defy the clamor of this misled mob who cried for the blood of Jesus, he ordered the Jewish guards and the Roman soldiers to take Jesus and scourge him. This was in itself an unjust and illegal procedure since the Roman law provided that only those condemned to die by crucifixion should be thus subjected to scourging. The guards took Jesus into the open courtyard of the praetorium for this ordeal. Though his enemies did not witness this scourging, Pilate did, and before they had finished this wicked abuse, he directed the scourgers to desist and indicated that Jesus should be brought to him. Before the scourgers laid their knotted whips upon Jesus as he was bound to the whipping post, they again put upon him the purple robe, and plaiting a crown of thorns, they placed it upon his brow. And when they had put a reed in his hand as a mock scepter, they knelt before him and mocked him, saying, “Hail, king of the Jews!” And they spit upon him and struck him in the face with their hands. And one of them, before they returned him to Pilate, took the reed from his hand and struck him upon the head.

 

(1995.2)185:6.3 Then Pilate led forth this bleeding and lacerated prisoner and, presenting him before the mixed multitude, said: “Behold the man! Again I declare to you that I find no crime in him, and having scourged him, I would release him.”

 

(1995.3)185:6.4 There stood Jesus of Nazareth, clothed in an old purple royal robe with a crown of thorns piercing his kindly brow. His face was bloodstained and his form bowed down with suffering and grief. But nothing can appeal to the unfeeling hearts of those who are victims of intense emotional hatred and slaves to religious prejudice. This sight sent a mighty shudder through the realms of a vast universe, but it did not touch the hearts of those who had set their minds to effect the destruction of Jesus.

 

(1995.4)185:6.5 When they had recovered from the first shock of seeing the Master’s plight, they only shouted the louder and the longer, “Crucify him! Crucify him! Crucify him!”

 

(1995.5)185:6.6 And now did Pilate comprehend that it was futile to appeal to their supposed feelings of pity. He stepped forward and said: “I perceive that you are determined this man shall die, but what has he done to deserve death? Who will declare his crime?”

 

(1995.6)185:6.7 Then the high priest himself stepped forward and, going up to Pilate, angrily declared: “We have a sacred law, and by that law this man ought to die because he made himself out to be the Son of God.” When Pilate heard this, he was all the more afraid, not only of the Jews, but recalling his wife’s note and the Greek mythology of the gods coming down on earth, he now trembled at the thought of Jesus possibly being a divine personage. He waved to the crowd to hold its peace while he took Jesus by the arm and again led him inside the building that he might further examine him. Pilate was now confused by fear, bewildered by superstition, and harassed by the stubborn attitude of the mob.

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#14 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 17 September 2014 - 05:00 AM


.

Good Day Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

From the whipping post to the cross, our sovereign sweat, shook and bled. Those seven hours of intense abuse and pain must have felt like years. Few humans have had to endure such. As much as it hurt physically, the intense negative emotions our hero experienced were surely just as great. What a horrible moment, and not just for benighted Urantia, but for all Nebadon. God himself must have shed a divine tear watching his son being torn and tortured.

 

I grew up in a time and place where beatings and whippings were the norm. Parents and teachers would whip and spank us until we were bleeding, and/or black and blue. And when our supervisors weren't punishing us we would beat up each other. I received and gave many a beating, but I never had to endure such a whipping as Jesus took on this "good Friday". Poor, conflicted Pilate watched til he could no more. Evidently Jesus took the whipping with the old robe on, which would have blunted the lashes slightly.

 

From today's reading:
 

...Before the scourgers laid their knotted whips upon Jesus as he was bound to the whipping post, they again put upon him the purple robe, and plaiting a crown of thorns, they placed it upon his brow.... (1995.1)185:6.2
 

There are abundant painted images of this despicable scene. I choose not to put them here, there's no reason to depict and possibly glorify this gross abuse, this sadistic blood lust that was intended to soften the hearts of Jesus' accusers.

 

From today's text:
 

...This sight sent a mighty shudder through the realms of a vast universe, but it did not touch the hearts of those who had set their minds to effect the destruction of Jesus.... (1995.3)185:6.4
 

Such callousness makes one ashamed of being human, doesn't it? And this bloody, grisly scourging was perfectly justified and legally supported! Said the high priest in today's reading:
 

"...We have a sacred law, and by that law this man ought to die because he made himself out to be the Son of God...." (1995.6)185:6.7
 

 

***

 

The Gospel records each have something about this second time before Pilate. Only Luke and John mention the scourging:

 

From Matthew 27:

 

29 And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews!

30 And they spit upon him, and took the reed, and smote him on the head.

 

From Mark 15:

 

17 And they clothed him with purple, and platted a crown of thorns, and put it about his head,

18 And began to salute him, Hail, King of the Jews!

19 And they smote him on the head with a reed, and did spit upon him, and bowing their knees worshipped him.

 

From Luke 23:

 

13 And Pilate, when he had called together the chief priests and the rulers and the people,

14 Said unto them, Ye have brought this man unto me, as one that perverteth the people: and, behold, I, having examined him before you, have found no fault in this man touching those things whereof ye accuse him:

15 No, nor yet Herod: for I sent you to him; and, lo, nothing worthy of death is done unto him.

16 I will therefore chastise him, and release him.

 

From John 19:

 

1 Then Pilate therefore took Jesus, and scourged him.

And the soldiers platted a crown of thorns, and put it on his head, and they put on him a purple robe,

And said, Hail, King of the Jews! and they smote him with their hands.

Pilate therefore went forth again, and saith unto them, Behold, I bring him forth to you, that ye may know that I find no fault in him.

Then came Jesus forth, wearing the crown of thorns, and the purple robe. And Pilate saith unto them, Behold the man!

When the chief priests therefore and officers saw him, they cried out, saying, Crucify him, crucify him.

 

***

 

The Midwayers mention the mingling of Greek gods and humans in today's reading:
 

...When Pilate heard this, he was all the more afraid, not only of the Jews, but recalling his wife’s note and the Greek mythology of the gods coming down on earth.... (1995.6)185:6.7
 

From Wikipedia:
 

Bridging the age when gods lived alone and the age when divine interference in human affairs was limited was a transitional age in which gods and mortals moved together. These were the early days of the world when the groups mingled more freely than they did later. Most of these tales were later told by Ovid's Metamorphoses and they are often divided into two thematic groups: tales of love, and tales of punishment.

 

Tales of love often involve incest, or the seduction or rape of a mortal woman by a male god, resulting in heroic offspring. The stories generally suggest that relationships between gods and mortals are something to avoid; even consenting relationships rarely have happy endings. In a few cases, a female divinity mates with a mortal man, as in the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite, where the goddess lies with Anchises to produce Aeneas.

 

The second type (tales of punishment) involves the appropriation or invention of some important cultural artifact, as when Prometheus steals fire from the gods, when Tantalus steals nectar and ambrosia from Zeus' table and gives it to his own subjects—revealing to them the secrets of the gods, when Prometheus or Lycaon invents sacrifice, when Demeter teaches agriculture and the Mysteries to Triptolemus, or when Marsyas invents the aulos and enters into a musical contest with Apollo.

 

Ian Morris considers Prometheus' adventures as "a place between the history of the gods and that of man". An anonymous papyrus fragment, dated to the third century, vividly portrays Dionysus' punishment of the king of Thrace, Lycurgus, whose recognition of the new god came too late, resulting in horrific penalties that extended into the afterlife. The story of the arrival of Dionysus to establish his cult in Thrace was also the subject of an Aeschylean trilogy. In another tragedy, Euripides' The Bacchae, the king of Thebes, Pentheus, is punished by Dionysus, because he disrespected the god and spied on his Maenads, the female worshippers of the god.

 

In another story, based on an old folktale-motif, and echoing a similar theme, Demeter was searching for her daughter, Persephone, having taken the form of an old woman called Doso, and received a hospitable welcome from Celeus, the King of Eleusis in Attica. As a gift to Celeus, because of his hospitality, Demeter planned to make his son Demophon a god, but she was unable to complete the ritual because his mother Metanira walked in and saw her son in the fire and screamed in fright, which angered Demeter, who lamented that foolish mortals do not understand the concept and ritual.

 

SOURCE/MORE
 

***

 

In tomorrow’s reading, Section 7. Pilate’s Last Interview, the fearful Roman governor vacillates between Jesus and the crowd, at one point coming very close to releasing him. But chief priest Caiaphas accosts Pilate declaring retribution if the Sanhedrin demand for execution is thwarted.

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate

2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#15 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 18 September 2014 - 03:56 AM


Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

 

   As Pilate, trembling with fearful emotion, sat down by the side of Jesus, he inquired: “Where do you come from? Really, who are you? What is this they say, that you are the Son of God?”

 

(1996.1)185:7.2 But Jesus could hardly answer such questions when asked by a man-fearing, weak, and vacillating judge who was so unjust as to subject him to flogging even when he had declared him innocent of all crime, and before he had been duly sentenced to die. Jesus looked Pilate straight in the face, but he did not answer him. Then said Pilate: “Do you refuse to speak to me? Do you not realize that I still have power to release you or to crucify you?” Then said Jesus: “You could have no power over me except it were permitted from above. You could exercise no authority over the Son of Man unless the Father in heaven allowed it. But you are not so guilty since you are ignorant of the gospel. He who betrayed me and he who delivered me to you, they have the greater sin.”

 

(1996.2)185:7.3 This last talk with Jesus thoroughly frightened Pilate. This moral coward and judicial weakling now labored under the double weight of the superstitious fear of Jesus and mortal dread of the Jewish leaders.

 

(1996.3)185:7.4 Again Pilate appeared before the crowd, saying: “I am certain this man is only a religious offender. You should take him and judge him by your law. Why should you expect that I would consent to his death because he has clashed with your traditions?”

 

(1996.4)185:7.5 Pilate was just about ready to release Jesus when Caiaphas, the high priest, approached the cowardly Roman judge and, shaking an avenging finger in Pilate’s face, said with angry words which the entire multitude could hear: “If you release this man, you are not Caesar’s friend, and I will see that the emperor knows all.” This public threat was too much for Pilate. Fear for his personal fortunes now eclipsed all other considerations, and the cowardly governor ordered Jesus brought out before the judgment seat. As the Master stood there before them, he pointed to him and tauntingly said, “Behold your king.” And the Jews answered, “Away with him. Crucify him!” And then Pilate said, with much irony and sarcasm, “Shall I crucify your king?” And the Jews answered, “Yes, crucify him! We have no king but Caesar.” And then did Pilate realize that there was no hope of saving Jesus since he was unwilling to defy the Jews.

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#16 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 18 September 2014 - 05:12 AM


.

Greetings Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

Pilate seems to realize on some level this is THE pivotal decision of his fear-ridden life, even of an age! It's insane I know, but I can't help feeling sorry for him, caught between a love for material things and a vexing fear of an unknown and invisible spirit world.

 

Jesus has just been flogged and is about to lose his life, but it is Pilate who is shaking. From today's text:


...As Pilate, trembling with fearful emotion, sat down by the side of Jesus, he inquired: “Where do you come from? Really, who are you? What is this they say, that you are the Son of God?” (1995.7)185:7.1
 

He seems sincere, even if full of fear and selfishness. Maybe Pilate will get some mercy credits for being merely ignorant. Jesus appears to suggest that in today's reading:
 

"...you are not so guilty since you are ignorant of the gospel. He who betrayed me and he who delivered me to you, they have the greater sin....” (1996.1)185:7.2

 

The betrayer was Judas of course, the deliverers must be the Sanhedrin members, especially Caiaphas. This fellow elicits no sympathy from anyone but the crazed mob. His seems to be a presence of pure evil, but maybe even he will get credit for ignorance. Who can say in finality except Ancients of Days?

 

From today's reading:


...Pilate was just about ready to release Jesus when Caiaphas, the high priest, approached the cowardly Roman judge and, shaking an avenging finger in Pilate’s face, said with angry words which the entire multitude could hear: “If you release this man, you are not Caesar’s friend, and I will see that the emperor knows all...." (1996.4)185:7.5
 

As previously noted, John's Gospel recorded many details of this second meeting with Pilate, in chapter 19:

 

And went again into the judgment hall, and saith unto Jesus, Whence art thou? But Jesus gave him no answer.

10 Then saith Pilate unto him, Speakest thou not unto me? knowest thou not that I have power to crucify thee, and have power to release thee?

11 Jesus answered, Thou couldest have no power at all against me, except it were given thee from above: therefore he that delivered me unto thee hath the greater sin.

12 And from thenceforth Pilate sought to release him: but the Jews cried out, saying, If thou let this man go, thou art not Caesar's friend: whosoever maketh himself a king speaketh against Caesar.

13 When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he brought Jesus forth, and sat down in the judgment seat in a place that is called the Pavement, but in the Hebrew, Gabbatha.

14 And it was the preparation of the passover, and about the sixth hour: and he saith unto the Jews, Behold your King!

15 But they cried out, Away with him, away with him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests answered, We have no king but Caesar.

 

 

***

 

Several paintings of Pilate's decisive moment were created during and after the European Renaissance, all titled "Ecce Homo"--Behold the Man!

 

Ecce_homo_by_Antonio_Ciseri_%281%29.jpg

Antonio Ciseri's depiction of Ecce Homo, 1871.

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

1024px-Munk%C3%A1csy_Ecce_Homo_part.JPG

Ecce Homo by Mihály Munkácsy 1896.

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

James_Tissot_Ecce_Homo_350.jpg

 

IMAGE SOURCE
 

From Wikipedia:

Ecce homo are the Latin words used by Pontius Pilate in the Vulgate translation of John 19:5, when he presents a scourged Jesus Christ, bound and crowned with thorns, to a hostile crowd shortly before his Crucifixion...The King James Version translates the phrase into English as "Behold the man!"[John 19:5] The scene is widely depicted in Christian art.

 

 

***

 

Tomorrow’s reading, Section 8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender, is just two paragraphs in which Pilate capitulates, then symbolically washes his hands, while the mad mob gleefully celebrates bringing untold suffering to their children, and their children's children, right up to and including the 21st century.

 

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate

2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#17 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 18 September 2014 - 10:30 AM

 

 

…Pilate was just about ready to release Jesus when Caiaphas, the high priest, approached the cowardly Roman judge….” (1996.4)185:7.5

 

After thinking about it for a while, I realized that if Pilate had somehow, in a rage of righteous indignation, gathered up his gumption and said: “No! I won’t let you kill this innocent man!!”, the same thing would have happened, only with more pain and abuse.

 

Caiaphas would have made good on his promise to report him to the emperor, Herod (he wanted Jesus dead too) probably would have gone against Pilate, the emperor would have then fired Pilate because of a Jewish riot, and there might even have been another mock trial. But in the end, and soon, Jesus would be put to death, and probably crucified.

 

I have trouble mustering any compassion or sympathy for Caiaphas, but Pilate—I pray he made it to the other side, or like nelsong suspects, to the sleeping estate. The Midwayers said this about him in 177:

 

…Judas did not seem to discern the look of disdain and even disgust that came over the face of the hardhearted and vainglorious Caiaphas…. (1925.4)177:4.7

 

Couldn’t find any references to Caiaphas after the trial. Only this in Wikipedia:

 

…He (Josephus the secular historian) also states that the proconsul Vitellius deposed him (Antiquitates Judaicae 18.95-97). Josephus’ account is based on an older source in which incumbents of the high priesthood were listed chronologically.

 

SOURCE/MORE



#18 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 19 September 2014 - 04:20 AM


Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today’s Presentation

 

Paper 185 - The Trial Before Pilate

 

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

   Here stood the Son of God incarnate as the Son of Man. He was arrested without indictment; accused without evidence; adjudged without witnesses; punished without a verdict; and now was soon to be condemned to die by an unjust judge who confessed that he could find no fault in him. If Pilate had thought to appeal to their patriotism by referring to Jesus as the “king of the Jews,” he utterly failed. The Jews were not expecting any such a king. The declaration of the chief priests and the Sadducees, “We have no king but Caesar,” was a shock even to the unthinking populace, but it was too late now to save Jesus even had the mob dared to espouse the Master’s cause.

 

(1996.6)185:8.2 Pilate was afraid of a tumult or a riot. He dared not risk having such a disturbance during Passover time in Jerusalem. He had recently received a reprimand from Caesar, and he would not risk another. The mob cheered when he ordered the release of Barabbas. Then he ordered a basin and some water, and there before the multitude he washed his hands, saying: “I am innocent of the blood of this man. You are determined that he shall die, but I have found no guilt in him. See you to it. The soldiers will lead him forth.” And then the mob cheered and replied, “His blood be on us and on our children.”

 

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#19 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 19 September 2014 - 04:42 AM


.

Good Day Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

What strange doings. An innocent God incarnate is unjustly tried and sentenced, a murderer is released for no good reason, and Jesus' Jewish accusers (who resent bearing their foreign yolk) declare allegiance to Rome!

 

From today's text:

 

   ...The declaration of the chief priests and the Sadducees, “We have no king but Caesar,” was a shock even to the unthinking populace.... (1996.5)185:8.1

 

And then, Pilate brings out his wash basin in a puerile attempt to absolve himself!!

 

James_Tissot_Pilate_Washes_His_Hands_400

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

Barabbas' story is well known in Christian history. From Wikipedia:
 

Biblical account

 

Matthew refers to Barabbas only as a "notorious prisoner". Mark and Luke further refer to Barabbas as one involved in a stasis, a riot. Robert Eisenman states that John 18:40 refers to Barabbas as a lēstēs ("bandit"), "the word Josephus always employs when talking about Revolutionaries".

 

Three gospels state that there was a custom at Passover during which the Roman governor would release a prisoner of the crowd's choice; Mark 15:6, Matthew 27:15, and John 18:39. Later copies of Luke contain a corresponding verse (Luke 23:17), although it is not present in the earliest manuscripts, and may be a later gloss to bring Luke into conformity.

 

No custom of releasing prisoners in Jerusalem at Passover or any other time is recorded in any historical document other than the gospels.

 

1024px-GiveUsBarabbas.png

"Give us Barabbas!", from The Bible and its Story Taught by One Thousand Picture Lessons, 1910

 

IMAGE SOURCE
 

All four gospels have something about this closing scene with Pilate. Although the facts are somewhat out of order, they are in general agreement.

 

From Mark 15:

 

15 And so Pilate, willing to content the people, released Barabbas unto them, and delivered Jesus, when he had scourged him, to be crucified.

16 And the soldiers led him away into the hall, called Praetorium; and they call together the whole band.

17 And they clothed him with purple, and platted a crown of thorns, and put it about his head,

18 And began to salute him, Hail, King of the Jews!

19 And they smote him on the head with a reed, and did spit upon him, and bowing their knees worshipped him.

20 And when they had mocked him, they took off the purple from him, and put his own clothes on him, and led him out to crucify him.

 

From Matthew 27:

 

23 And the governor said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified.

24 When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but that rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it.

25 Then answered all the people, and said, His blood be on us, and on our children.

26 Then released he Barabbas unto them: and when he had scourged Jesus, he delivered him to be crucified.

27 Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the common hall, and gathered unto him the whole band of soldiers.

28 And they stripped him, and put on him a scarlet robe.

29 And when they had platted a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee before him, and mocked him, saying, Hail, King of the Jews!

30 And they spit upon him, and took the reed, and smote him on the head.

31 And after that they had mocked him, they took the robe off from him, and put his own raiment on him, and led him away to crucify him.

 

From Luke 23:

 

16 I will therefore chastise him, and release him.

17 (For of necessity he must release one unto them at the feast.)

18 And they cried out all at once, saying, Away with this man, and release unto us Barabbas:

19 (Who for a certain sedition made in the city, and for murder, was cast into prison.)

20 Pilate therefore, willing to release Jesus, spake again to them.

21 But they cried, saying, Crucify him, crucify him.

22 And he said unto them the third time, Why, what evil hath he done? I have found no cause of death in him: I will therefore chastise him, and let him go.

23 And they were instant with loud voices, requiring that he might be crucified. And the voices of them and of the chief priests prevailed.

24 And Pilate gave sentence that it should be as they required.

25 And he released unto them him that for sedition and murder was cast into prison, whom they had desired; but he delivered Jesus to their will.

 

From John 19:

 

12 And from thenceforth Pilate sought to release him: but the Jews cried out, saying, If thou let this man go, thou art not Caesar's friend: whosoever maketh himself a king speaketh against Caesar.

13 When Pilate therefore heard that saying, he brought Jesus forth, and sat down in the judgment seat in a place that is called the Pavement, but in the Hebrew, Gabbatha.

14 And it was the preparation of the passover, and about the sixth hour: and he saith unto the Jews, Behold your King!

15 But they cried out, Away with him, away with him, crucify him. Pilate saith unto them, Shall I crucify your King? The chief priests answered, We have no king but Caesar.

16 Then delivered he him therefore unto them to be crucified. And they took Jesus, and led him away.

 

 

***

 

That is all of 185. Tomorrow’s reading is the introduction to Paper 186, Jesus Before The Crucifixion  The Master sends John to Mary and Martha's home in Bethany where his family is waiting for news. He wants to see his mother once more, "ere I die". His siblings Ruth and Jude come with her to Golgotha.

 

Overview of Paper 185: The Trial Before Pilate

 

1. Pontius Pilate

2. Jesus Appears Before Pilate

3. The Private Examination by Pilate

4. Jesus Before Herod

5. Jesus Returns to Pilate

6. Pilate’s Last Appeal

7. Pilate’s Last Interview

8. Pilate’s Tragic Surrender

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 185: (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members’ thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today’s OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.





Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users