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PAPER 172 - GOING INTO JERUSALEM


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#1 Rick Warren

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 04:28 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 172 - Going into Jerusalem

 

[INTRODUCTION]

 

   JESUS and the apostles arrived at Bethany shortly after four o’clock on Friday afternoon, March 31, A.D. 30. Lazarus, his sisters, and their friends were expecting them; and since so many people came every day to talk with Lazarus about his resurrection, Jesus was informed that arrangements had been made for him to stay with a neighboring believer, one Simon, the leading citizen of the little village since the death of Lazarus’s father.

 

(1878.2)172:0.2 That evening, Jesus received many visitors, and the common folks of Bethany and Bethpage did their best to make him feel welcome. Although many thought Jesus was now going into Jerusalem, in utter defiance of the Sanhedrin’s decree of death, to proclaim himself king of the Jews, the Bethany family — Lazarus, Martha, and Mary — more fully realized that the Master was not that kind of a king; they dimly felt that this might be his last visit to Jerusalem and Bethany.

 

(1878.3)172:0.3 The chief priests were informed that Jesus lodged at Bethany, but they thought best not to attempt to seize him among his friends; they decided to await his coming on into Jerusalem. Jesus knew about all this, but he was majestically calm; his friends had never seen him more composed and congenial; even the apostles were astounded that he should be so unconcerned when the Sanhedrin had called upon all Jewry to deliver him into their hands. While the Master slept that night, the apostles watched over him by twos, and many of them were girded with swords. Early the next morning they were awakened by hundreds of pilgrims who came out from Jerusalem, even on the Sabbath day, to see Jesus and Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead.

 

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#2 Rick Warren

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 06:17 AM

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Greetings Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests!
 
Welcome everyone to the OPAD presentation of Paper 172. This Paper has five Sections and ten pages. It spans Jesus' last weekend in the flesh, from Friday evening to Sunday night, March 31 to April 2, 30 AD.
 
By the next Friday evening, April 7th, his body will be but a lifeless, empty form nailed to a Roman cross. The next 125 pages are about the events that took place at or near Jerusalem during this, his final week as a man.
 
This Paper has the stories of Mary applying an expensive ointment to Jesus head and feet after a feast at her house. He rebukes her critics, that angers Judas Iscariot. The priests hear about this feast for Jesus at the home of Mary and Lazarus, and decide that Lazarus must also die.
 
Next the Master reviews the apostles' long sojourn with him. And here he gives them final instructions. Also Jesus tells Lazarus not to become a victim of the Sandedrin. He flees to Philadelphia a few days later.
 
Jesus considers his entrance into Jerusalem and decides to fulfill a prophesy in the Old Testament book of Zechariah. He chooses to ride in on a donkey. A great crowd welcomes him, but he pauses on Olivet to weep over Jerusalem's obstinate rejection. And these throngs are what inhibited the Pharisees from arresting him. He and his apostles roam the temple and watch an old woman deposit "two mites" in the temple coffer. Jesus notes she gave more than all others. They return to Bethany on Sunday eve.
 
The last Section of this Paper describes what each of the apostles were feeling and thinking, from Andrew to Judas. It is here that Judas decides to desert his Master and friend.
 
This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.
 
 
***
 
The introduction of this Paper mentions Bethany and Bethpage:

 

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The Gospel of John has the only scripture that coincides with today's reading, chapter 11:

 

57 Now both the chief priests and the Pharisees had given a commandment, that, if any man knew where he were, he should shew it, that they might take him.

 
Chapter 12:
 
Much people of the Jews therefore knew that he was there: and they came not for Jesus' sake only, but that they might see Lazarus also, whom he had raised from the dead.
 
 
***
 
Tomorrow's reading, Section 1. Sabbath at Bethany, has the well known story of a feast of honor at Bethany, where spikenard is applied to the Master's head and feet. This sets off a debate about the cost of the precious oil and how that money might be better used. Judas uses this incident as an excuse to think of revenge, and the Sanhedrin decide to kill Lazarus too.
 
Listen to Paper 172 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.


#3 Rick Warren

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 05:01 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 172 - Going into Jerusalem

 

1. Sabbath at Bethany

 

 

   Pilgrims from outside of Judea, as well as the Jewish authorities, had all been asking: “What do you think? will Jesus come up to the feast?” Therefore, when the people heard that Jesus was at Bethany, they were glad, but the chief priests and Pharisees were somewhat perplexed. They were pleased to have him under their jurisdiction, but they were a trifle disconcerted by his boldness; they remembered that on his previous visit to Bethany, Lazarus had been raised from the dead, and Lazarus was becoming a big problem to the enemies of Jesus.

 

(1878.5) 172:1.2 Six days before the Passover, on the evening after the Sabbath, all Bethany and Bethpage joined in celebrating the arrival of Jesus by a public banquet at the home of Simon. This supper was in honor of both Jesus and Lazarus; it was tendered in defiance of the Sanhedrin. Martha directed the serving of the food; her sister Mary was among the women onlookers as it was against the custom of the Jews for a woman to sit at a public banquet. The agents of the Sanhedrin were present, but they feared to apprehend Jesus in the midst of his friends.

 

(1879.1) 172:1.3 Jesus talked with Simon about Joshua of old, whose namesake he was, and recited how Joshua and the Israelites had come up to Jerusalem through Jericho. In commenting on the legend of the walls of Jericho falling down, Jesus said: “I am not concerned with such walls of brick and stone; but I would cause the walls of prejudice, self-righteousness, and hate to crumble before this preaching of the Father’s love for all men.”

 

(1879.2) 172:1.4 The banquet went along in a very cheerful and normal manner except that all the apostles were unusually sober. Jesus was exceptionally cheerful and had been playing with the children up to the time of coming to the table.

 

(1879.3) 172:1.5 Nothing out of the ordinary happened until near the close of the feasting when Mary the sister of Lazarus stepped forward from among the group of women onlookers and, going up to where Jesus reclined as the guest of honor, proceeded to open a large alabaster cruse of very rare and costly ointment; and after anointing the Master’s head, she began to pour it upon his feet as she took down her hair and wiped them with it. The whole house became filled with the odor of the ointment, and everybody present was amazed at what Mary had done. Lazarus said nothing, but when some of the people murmured, showing indignation that so costly an ointment should be thus used, Judas Iscariot stepped over to where Andrew reclined and said: “Why was this ointment not sold and the money bestowed to feed the poor? You should speak to the Master that he rebuke such waste.”

 

(1879.4) 172:1.6 Jesus, knowing what they thought and hearing what they said, put his hand upon Mary’s head as she knelt by his side and, with a kindly expression upon his face, said: “Let her alone, every one of you. Why do you trouble her about this, seeing that she has done a good thing in her heart? To you who murmur and say that this ointment should have been sold and the money given to the poor, let me say that you have the poor always with you so that you may minister to them at any time it seems good to you; but I shall not always be with you; I go soon to my Father. This woman has long saved this ointment for my body at its burial, and now that it has seemed good to her to make this anointing in anticipation of my death, she shall not be denied such satisfaction. In the doing of this, Mary has reproved all of you in that by this act she evinces faith in what I have said about my death and ascension to my Father in heaven. This woman shall not be reproved for that which she has this night done; rather do I say to you that in the ages to come, wherever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, what she has done will be spoken of in memory of her.”

 

(1879.5) 172:1.7 It was because of this rebuke, which he took as a personal reproof, that Judas Iscariot finally made up his mind to seek revenge for his hurt feelings. Many times had he entertained such ideas subconsciously, but now he dared to think such wicked thoughts in his open and conscious mind. And many others encouraged him in this attitude since the cost of this ointment was a sum equal to the earnings of one man for one year — enough to provide bread for five thousand persons. But Mary loved Jesus; she had provided this precious ointment with which to embalm his body in death, for she believed his words when he forewarned them that he must die, and it was not to be denied her if she changed her mind and chose to bestow this offering upon the Master while he yet lived.

 

(1879.6) 172:1.8 Both Lazarus and Martha knew that Mary had long saved the money wherewith to buy this cruse of spikenard, and they heartily approved of her doing as her heart desired in such a matter, for they were well-to-do and could easily afford to make such an offering.

 

(1880.1) 172:1.9 When the chief priests heard of this dinner in Bethany for Jesus and Lazarus, they began to take counsel among themselves as to what should be done with Lazarus. And presently they decided that Lazarus must also die. They rightly concluded that it would be useless to put Jesus to death if they permitted Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead, to live.

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#4 Rick Warren

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 06:37 AM

Good Day Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

This would be a wonderful feast to join in, wouldn't it?! At least for the men. Seems it is alright for a woman to prepare and serve the meal but not to participate:

 

...Martha directed the serving of the food; her sister Mary was among the women onlookers as it was against the custom of the Jews for a woman to sit at a public banquet.... (1878.5) 172:1.2

 

The guest of honor is savoring his last hours in the flesh with the kiddos:

 

... Jesus was exceptionally cheerful and had been playing with the children up to the time of coming to the table.... (1879.2) 172:1.4

 

***

 

From today's reading:

 

...Jesus talked with Simon about Joshua of old, whose namesake he was.... (1879.1) 172:1.3

 

Joshua's name appears almost 200 times in the Bible, he has his own book full of war and strife. The wall shouted down fable is in chapter 6:

 

20 So the people shouted when the priests blew with the trumpets: and it came to pass, when the people heard the sound of the trumpet, and the people shouted with a great shout, that the wall fell down flat, so that the people went up into the city, every man straight before him, and they took the city.

 

A Melchizedek mentions him in Paper 95:

 

...Desperately Joshua sought to hold the concept of a supreme Yahweh in the minds of the tribesmen, causing it to be proclaimed: “As I was with Moses, so will I be with you; I will not fail you nor forsake you.” Joshua found it necessary to preach a stern gospel to his disbelieving people, people all too willing to believe their old and native religion but unwilling to go forward in the religion of faith and righteousness.... (1059.4) 96:6.3

 

The Master knows the truth about that supposed miracle of trumpets and shouts breaking down walls. From today's reading:

 

“...I am not concerned with such walls of brick and stone; but I would cause the walls of prejudice, self-righteousness, and hate to crumble before this preaching of the Father’s love for all men...." (1879.1) 172:1.3

 

Those stubborn walls still stand, but someday they will all be torn down, a day when humanity reclaims its long awaited birthright as children of the Father of the Universe. How long O Lord?

 

***

 

It was surely a fascinating scene when a woman broke into the all male feast pouring fine oil over Jesus' head. Spikenard is little known today.

 

Spikenard; also called nard, nardin, and muskroot, is a flowering plant used in the manufacture of an intensely aromatic amber-colored essential oil. The oil has, since ancient times, been used as a perfume, as a medicine and in religious contexts, particularly in connection with historical Judaism. The identity of the plant used in manufacturing spikenard is not certain; Nardostachys jatamansi from Asia, and lavender from the Middle East have been suggested as candidates.

 

The Bible contains several references to the spikenard, and it is used in Catholic iconography to represent Saint Joseph.

 

 

Source/more

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IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

 

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IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

Jesus somehow knows this incident will echo down the halls of history:

 

"...I say to you that in the ages to come, wherever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, what she has done will be spoken of in memory of her....” (1879.4) 172:1.6

 

And it was recorded in Matthew 26:

 

6 Now when Jesus was in Bethany, in the house of Simon the leper,

 

7 There came unto him a woman having an alabaster box of very precious ointment, and poured it on his head, as he sat at meat.

 

8 But when his disciples saw it, they had indignation, saying, To what purpose is this waste?

 

9 For this ointment might have been sold for much, and given to the poor.

 

10 When Jesus understood it, he said unto them, Why trouble ye the woman? for she hath wrought a good work upon me.

 

11 For ye have the poor always with you; but me ye have not always.

 

12 For in that she hath poured this ointment on my body, she did it for my burial.

 

13 Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached in the whole world, there shall also this, that this woman hath done, be told for a memorial of her.

 

 

Mark 14 also has the story:

 

3 And being in Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at meat, there came a woman having an alabaster box of ointment of spikenard very precious; and she brake the box, and poured it on his head.

 

4 And there were some that had indignation within themselves, and said, Why was this waste of the ointment made?

 

5 For it might have been sold for more than three hundred pence, and have been given to the poor. And they murmured against her.

 

6 And Jesus said, Let her alone; why trouble ye her? she hath wrought a good work on me.

 

7 For ye have the poor with you always, and whensoever ye will ye may do them good: but me ye have not always.

 

8 She hath done what she could: she is come aforehand to anoint my body to the burying.

 

9 Verily I say unto you, Wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her.

 

 

Even the Gospel of John cites this incident, at the end of chapter 11 and the beginning of 12:

 

55 And the Jews' passover was nigh at hand: and many went out of the country up to Jerusalem before the passover, to purify themselves.

 

56 Then sought they for Jesus, and spake among themselves, as they stood in the temple, What think ye, that he will not come to the feast?

 

57 Now both the chief priests and the Pharisees had given a commandment, that, if any man knew where he were, he should shew it, that they might take him.

 

 

1 Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was, which had been dead, whom he raised from the dead.

2 There they made him a supper; and Martha served: but Lazarus was one of them that sat at the table with him.

 

3 Then took Mary a pound of ointment of spikenard, very costly, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair: and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment.

 

4 Then saith one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, which should betray him,

 

5 Why was not this ointment sold for three hundred pence, and given to the poor?

 

6 This he said, not that he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief, and had the bag, and bare what was put therein.

 

7 Then said Jesus, Let her alone: against the day of my burying hath she kept this.

 

8 For the poor always ye have with you; but me ye have not always.

 

9 Much people of the Jews therefore knew that he was there: and they came not for Jesus' sake only, but that they might see Lazarus also, whom he had raised from the dead.

 

 

From the last paragraph of today's reading:

 

...presently they decided that Lazarus must also die. They rightly concluded that it would be useless to put Jesus to death if they permitted Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead, to live.... (1880.1) 172:1.9

 

From John 12:

 

10 But the chief priests consulted that they might put Lazarus also to death;

11 Because that by reason of him many of the Jews went away, and believed on Jesus.

 

 

***

 

Tomorrow's reading, Section 2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles, is a short one, it has the Master's instructions for the apostles during this last week of his life, to do no teaching. And he tells Lazarus to leave Bethany, lest he be killed too.

 

 

Overview of Paper 172. Going into Jerusalem

 

1. Sabbath at Bethany

2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles

3. The Start for Jerusalem

4. Visiting about the Temple

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

 

Listen to Paper 172 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#5 Rick Warren

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 04:09 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 172 - Going into Jerusalem

 

2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles

 

 

   On this Sunday morning, in Simon’s beautiful garden, the Master called his twelve apostles around him and gave them their final instructions preparatory to entering Jerusalem. He told them that he would probably deliver many addresses and teach many lessons before returning to the Father but advised the apostles to refrain from doing any public work during this Passover sojourn in Jerusalem. He instructed them to remain near him and to “watch and pray.” Jesus knew that many of his apostles and immediate followers even then carried swords concealed on their persons, but he made no reference to this fact.

 

(1880.3) 172:2.2 This morning’s instructions embraced a brief review of their ministry from the day of their ordination near Capernaum down to this day when they were preparing to enter Jerusalem. The apostles listened in silence; they asked no questions.

 

(1880.4) 172:2.3 Early that morning David Zebedee had turned over to Judas the funds realized from the sale of the equipment of the Pella encampment, and Judas, in turn, had placed the greater part of this money in the hands of Simon, their host, for safekeeping in anticipation of the exigencies of their entry into Jerusalem.

 

(1880.5) 172:2.4 After the conference with the apostles Jesus held converse with Lazarus and instructed him to avoid the sacrifice of his life to the vengefulness of the Sanhedrin. It was in obedience to this admonition that Lazarus, a few days later, fled to Philadelphia when the officers of the Sanhedrin sent men to arrest him.

 

(1880.6) 172:2.5 In a way, all of Jesus’ followers sensed the impending crisis, but they were prevented from fully realizing its seriousness by the unusual cheerfulness and exceptional good humor of the Master.

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#6 Rick Warren

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 05:06 AM

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Greetings Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

There is so very much to be learned from this God-man, about how to teach and lead, with compassion, perspective and grace. The apostles seem to be overwhelmed by the "impending crisis". For once, they have nothing to say:

 

...This morning’s instructions embraced a brief review of their ministry from the day of their ordination near Capernaum down to this day when they were preparing to enter Jerusalem. The apostles listened in silence; they asked no questions.... (1880.3) 172:2.2

 

(See Paper 140 for the ordination story.)

 

One good thing can be said about Judas, he always took excellent care of the group's finances. From today's reading:

 

...Judas, in turn, had placed the greater part of this money in the hands of Simon, their host, for safekeeping in anticipation of the exigencies of their entry into Jerusalem.... (1880.4) 172:2.3

 

 

About Lazarus' escape from the Sanhedrin, in today's text:

 

...Lazarus, a few days later, fled to Philadelphia when the officers of the Sanhedrin sent men to arrest him.... (1880.5) 172:2.4

 

From Paper 168:

 

...Lazarus remained at the Bethany home, being the center of great interest to many sincere believers and to numerous curious individuals, until the days of the crucifixion of Jesus, when he received warning that the Sanhedrin had decreed his death.... (1849.5) 168:5.1

 

...He became a strong supporter of Abner in his controversy with Paul and the Jerusalem church and ultimately died, when 67 years old, of the same sickness that carried him off when he was a younger man at Bethany.... (1849.7) 168:5.3

 

Historians believe he was buried near his former home in Bethany:

 

1024px-Lazarus_Bethany.JPG

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

 

***

 

Surely it was hard to reconcile the Master's death prediction and his happy attitude just five days before it will happen. From the last paragraph of today's reading:

 

...they were prevented from fully realizing its seriousness by the unusual cheerfulness and exceptional good humor of the Master.... (1880.6) 172:2.5

 

Would we be so cheerful with a death sentence looming?! It's not just death that awaits him, much suffering will precede his dying, and he knows this. Still he can smile.

 

***

 

In tomorrow's reading, Section 3. The Start for Jerusalem, Jesus thinks over his options for entering the city. He chooses the method because of an old scripture, and sends Peter and John to borrow a donkey. On the way in, the Master weeps once more for Jerusalem, who kills prophets and stones holy men.

 

 

Overview of Paper 172. Going into Jerusalem

 

1. Sabbath at Bethany

2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles

3. The Start for Jerusalem

4. Visiting about the Temple

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 172 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#7 Rick Warren

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 05:34 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 172 - Going into Jerusalem

 

3. The Start for Jerusalem

 

[Part 1 of 2]

 

   Bethany was about two miles from the temple, and it was half past one that Sunday afternoon when Jesus made ready to start for Jerusalem. He had feelings of profound affection for Bethany and its simple people. Nazareth, Capernaum, and Jerusalem had rejected him, but Bethany had accepted him, had believed in him. And it was in this small village, where almost every man, woman, and child were believers, that he chose to perform the mightiest work of his earth bestowal, the resurrection of Lazarus. He did not raise Lazarus that the villagers might believe, but rather because they already believed.

 

(1880.8) 172:3.2 All morning Jesus had thought about his entry into Jerusalem. Heretofore he had always endeavored to suppress all public acclaim of him as the Messiah, but it was different now; he was nearing the end of his career in the flesh, his death had been decreed by the Sanhedrin, and no harm could come from allowing his disciples to give free expression to their feelings, just as might occur if he elected to make a formal and public entry into the city.

 

(1881.1) 172:3.3 Jesus did not decide to make this public entrance into Jerusalem as a last bid for popular favor nor as a final grasp for power. Neither did he do it altogether to satisfy the human longings of his disciples and apostles. Jesus entertained none of the illusions of a fantastic dreamer; he well knew what was to be the outcome of this visit.

 

(1881.2) 172:3.4 Having decided upon making a public entrance into Jerusalem, the Master was confronted with the necessity of choosing a proper method of executing such a resolve. Jesus thought over all of the many more or less contradictory so-called Messianic prophesies, but there seemed to be only one which was at all appropriate for him to follow. Most of these prophetic utterances depicted a king, the son and successor of David, a bold and aggressive temporal deliverer of all Israel from the yoke of foreign domination. But there was one Scripture that had sometimes been associated with the Messiah by those who held more to the spiritual concept of his mission, which Jesus thought might consistently be taken as a guide for his projected entry into Jerusalem. This Scripture was found in Zechariah, and it said: “Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem. Behold, your king comes to you. He is just and he brings salvation. He comes as the lowly one, riding upon an ass, upon a colt, the foal of an ass.”

 

(1881.3) 172:3.5 A warrior king always entered a city riding upon a horse; a king on a mission of peace and friendship always entered riding upon an ass. Jesus would not enter Jerusalem as a man on horseback, but he was willing to enter peacefully and with good will as the Son of Man on a donkey.

 

(1881.4) 172:3.6 Jesus had long tried by direct teaching to impress upon his apostles and his disciples that his kingdom was not of this world, that it was a purely spiritual matter; but he had not succeeded in this effort. Now, what he had failed to do by plain and personal teaching, he would attempt to accomplish by a symbolic appeal. Accordingly, right after the noon lunch, Jesus called Peter and John, and after directing them to go over to Bethpage, a neighboring village a little off the main road and a short distance northwest of Bethany, he further said: “Go to Bethpage, and when you come to the junction of the roads, you will find the colt of an ass tied there. Loose the colt and bring it back with you. If anyone asks you why you do this, merely say, ‘The Master has need of him.’” And when the two apostles had gone into Bethpage as the Master had directed, they found the colt tied near his mother in the open street and close to a house on the corner. As Peter began to untie the colt, the owner came over and asked why they did this, and when Peter answered him as Jesus had directed, the man said: “If your Master is Jesus from Galilee, let him have the colt.” And so they returned bringing the colt with them.*

 

(1881.5) 172:3.7 By this time several hundred pilgrims had gathered around Jesus and his apostles. Since midforenoon the visitors passing by on their way to the Passover had tarried. Meanwhile, David Zebedee and some of his former messenger associates took it upon themselves to hasten on down to Jerusalem, where they effectively spread the report among the throngs of visiting pilgrims about the temple that Jesus of Nazareth was making a triumphal entry into the city. Accordingly, several thousand of these visitors flocked forth to greet this much-talked-of prophet and wonder-worker, whom some believed to be the Messiah. This multitude, coming out from Jerusalem, met Jesus and the crowd going into the city just after they had passed over the brow of Olivet and had begun the descent into the city.

 

(1882.1) 172:3.8 As the procession started out from Bethany, there was great enthusiasm among the festive crowd of disciples, believers, and visiting pilgrims, many hailing from Galilee and Perea. Just before they started, the twelve women of the original women’s corps, accompanied by some of their associates, arrived on the scene and joined this unique procession as it moved on joyously toward the city.

 

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#8 Rick Warren

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 06:47 AM

.

 

Good Day Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

...Bethany was about two miles from the temple.... (1880.7) 172:3.1

 

Bethphage+Bethany+Map+2.jpg

 

MAP SOURCE

 

 

 

Only two miles apart, yet light years of wisdom separate the citizens of Bethany and the priests at Jerusalem. From today's reading:

 

...Jerusalem had rejected him, but Bethany had accepted him, had believed in him.... (1880.7) 172:3.1

 

***

 

...there was one Scripture that had sometimes been associated with the Messiah by those who held more to the spiritual concept of his mission.... (1881.2) 172:3.4

 

From Zacharias 9 (King James' translation):

 

9 Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: he is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass.

 

Compare with today's text:

 

"...Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem. Behold, your king comes to you. He is just and he brings salvation. He comes as the lowly one, riding upon an ass, upon a colt, the foal of an ass....” (1881.2) 172:3.4

 

Some of Jesus' instruction to Peter and John were recorded in the Gospels, three of them appear to have copied each other. As usual, John is the exception:

 

From Matthew 21:

 

1 And when they drew nigh unto Jerusalem, and were come to Bethphage, unto the mount of Olives, then sent Jesus two disciples,

2 Saying unto them, Go into the village over against you, and straightway ye shall find an ass tied, and a colt with her: loose them, and bring them unto me.

3 And if any man say ought unto you, ye shall say, The Lord hath need of them; and straightway he will send them.

4 All this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying,

5 Tell ye the daughter of Sion, Behold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass, and a colt the foal of an ass.

6 And the disciples went, and did as Jesus commanded them,

7 And brought the ass, and the colt, and put on them their clothes, and they set him thereon.

 

From Luke 19:

 

28 And when he had thus spoken, he went before, ascending up to Jerusalem.

29 And it came to pass, when he was come nigh to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount called the mount of Olives, he sent two of his disciples,

30 Saying, Go ye into the village over against you; in the which at your entering ye shall find a colt tied, whereon yet never man sat: loose him, and bring him hither.

31 And if any man ask you, Why do ye loose him? thus shall ye say unto him, Because the Lord hath need of him.

32 And they that were sent went their way, and found even as he had said unto them.

33 And as they were loosing the colt, the owners thereof said unto them, Why loose ye the colt?

34 And they said, The Lord hath need of him.

35 And they brought him to Jesus: and they cast their garments upon the colt, and they set Jesus thereon.

 

From Mark 11:

 

1 And when they came nigh to Jerusalem, unto Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount of Olives, he sendeth forth two of his disciples,

2 And saith unto them, Go your way into the village over against you: and as soon as ye be entered into it, ye shall find a colt tied, whereon never man sat; loose him, and bring him.

3 And if any man say unto you, Why do ye this? say ye that the Lord hath need of him; and straightway he will send him hither.

4 And they went their way, and found the colt tied by the door without in a place where two ways met; and they loose him.

5 And certain of them that stood there said unto them, What do ye, loosing the colt?

6 And they said unto them even as Jesus had commanded: and they let them go.

7 And they brought the colt to Jesus, and cast their garments on him; and he sat upon him.

 

From John 12:

 

14 And Jesus, when he had found a young ass, sat thereon; as it is written,

15 Fear not, daughter of Sion: behold, thy King cometh, sitting on an ass's colt.

16 These things understood not his disciples at the first: but when Jesus was glorified, then remembered they that these things were written of him, and that they had done these things unto him.

 

James_Tissot_The_Foal_of_Bethpage_525.jp

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

...As the procession started out from Bethany, there was great enthusiasm among the festive crowd of disciples, believers, and visiting pilgrims, many hailing from Galilee and Perea.... (1882.1) 172:3.8

 

perea.gif

MAP SOURCE

 

 

 

***

 

From the last paragraph of today's reading:

 

...the twelve women of the original women’s corps, accompanied by some of their associates, arrived on the scene and joined this unique procession as it moved on joyously toward the city.... (1882.1) 172:3.8

 

See Paper 150:1 for more about the formation and ministry of the women's corps:

 

...Of all the daring things which Jesus did in connection with his earth career, the most amazing was his sudden announcement on the evening of January 16: “On the morrow we will set apart ten women for the ministering work of the kingdom....” (1678.5) 150:1.1

 

 

***

 

Tomorrow's reading is the last half of Section 3. The Start for Jerusalem. Jesus leads the crowd, but stops on Olivet to tearfully lament Jerusalem's hateful intransigence. He rides in on the donkey to great acclaim, as the Sanhedrin's agents ask him to rebuke his unseemly followers.

 

Overview of Paper 172. Going into Jerusalem

 

1. Sabbath at Bethany

2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles

3. The Start for Jerusalem

4. Visiting about the Temple

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 172 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.

 



#9 Rick Warren

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 05:36 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 172 - Going into Jerusalem

 

3. The Start for Jerusalem

 

[Part 2 of 2]

 

 

   Before they started, the Alpheus twins put their cloaks on the donkey and held him while the Master got on. As the procession moved toward the summit of Olivet, the festive crowd threw their garments on the ground and brought branches from the near-by trees in order to make a carpet of honor for the donkey bearing the royal Son, the promised Messiah. As the merry crowd moved on toward Jerusalem, they began to sing, or rather to shout in unison, the Psalm, “Hosanna to the son of David; blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest. Blessed be the kingdom that comes down from heaven.”

 

(1882.3) 172:3.10 Jesus was lighthearted and cheerful as they moved along until he came to the brow of Olivet, where the city and the temple towers came into full view; there the Master stopped the procession, and a great silence came upon all as they beheld him weeping. Looking down upon the vast multitude coming forth from the city to greet him, the Master, with much emotion and with tearful voice, said: “O Jerusalem, if you had only known, even you, at least in this your day, the things which belong to your peace, and which you could so freely have had! But now are these glories about to be hid from your eyes. You are about to reject the Son of Peace and turn your backs upon the gospel of salvation. The days will soon come upon you wherein your enemies will cast a trench around about you and lay siege to you on every side; they shall utterly destroy you, insomuch that not one stone shall be left upon another. And all this shall befall you because you knew not the time of your divine visitation. You are about to reject the gift of God, and all men will reject you.”

 

(1882.4) 172:3.11 When he had finished speaking, they began the descent of Olivet and presently were joined by the multitude of visitors who had come from Jerusalem waving palm branches, shouting hosannas, and otherwise expressing gleefulness and good fellowship. The Master had not planned that these crowds should come out from Jerusalem to meet them; that was the work of others. He never premeditated anything which was dramatic.

(1882.5) 172:3.12 Along with the multitude which poured out to welcome the Master, there came also many of the Pharisees and his other enemies. They were so much perturbed by this sudden and unexpected outburst of popular acclaim that they feared to arrest him lest such action precipitate an open revolt of the populace. They greatly feared the attitude of the large numbers of visitors, who had heard much of Jesus, and who, many of them, believed in him.

 

(1882.6) 172:3.13 As they neared Jerusalem, the crowd became more demonstrative, so much so that some of the Pharisees made their way up alongside Jesus and said: “Teacher, you should rebuke your disciples and exhort them to behave more seemly.” Jesus answered: “It is only fitting that these children should welcome the Son of Peace, whom the chief priests have rejected. It would be useless to stop them lest in their stead these stones by the roadside cry out.”

 

(1882.7) 172:3.14 The Pharisees hastened on ahead of the procession to rejoin the Sanhedrin, which was then in session at the temple, and they reported to their associates: “Behold, all that we do is of no avail; we are confounded by this Galilean. The people have gone mad over him; if we do not stop these ignorant ones, all the world will go after him.”

 

(1883.1) 172:3.15 There really was no deep significance to be attached to this superficial and spontaneous outburst of popular enthusiasm. This welcome, although it was joyous and sincere, did not betoken any real or deep-seated conviction in the hearts of this festive multitude. These same crowds were equally as willing quickly to reject Jesus later on this week when the Sanhedrin once took a firm and decided stand against him, and when they became disillusioned — when they realized that Jesus was not going to establish the kingdom in accordance with their long-cherished expectations.

 

(1883.2) 172:3.16 But the whole city was mightily stirred up, insomuch that everyone asked, “Who is this man?” And the multitude answered, “This is the prophet of Galilee, Jesus of Nazareth.”

 

 

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#10 Rick Warren

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 06:31 AM

.

 

Greetings Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

What a scene it must have been:

 

Harold_Copping_Riding_Into_Jerusalem_400

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

***

 

This Psalm in today's reading:
 

“...Hosanna to the son of David; blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. Hosanna in the highest. Blessed be the kingdom that comes down from heaven.... (1882.2) 172:3.9

 

 

...appears in Psalms 118, but only the first part:

 

26 Blessed be he that cometh in the name of the Lord: we have blessed you out of the house of the Lord.

 

And all four Gospel writers recorded it.

 

From Matthew 21:

 

And a very great multitude spread their garments in the way; others cut down branches from the trees, and strawed them in the way.

 

And the multitudes that went before, and that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna to the son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest.

 

From Mark 11:

 

And many spread their garments in the way: and others cut down branches off the trees, and strawed them in the way.

 

And they that went before, and they that followed, cried, saying, Hosanna; Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord:

 

10 Blessed be the kingdom of our father David, that cometh in the name of the Lord: Hosanna in the highest.

 

 

John has the events out of order, mounting the colt coming after the Hosannas:

 

12 On the next day much people that were come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem,

 

13 Took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord.

 

14 And Jesus, when he had found a young ass, sat thereon; as it is written,

 

15 Fear not, daughter of Sion: behold, thy King cometh, sitting on an ass's colt.

 

16 These things understood not his disciples at the first: but when Jesus was glorified, then remembered they that these things were written of him, and that they had done these things unto him.

 

17 The people therefore that was with him when he called Lazarus out of his grave, and raised him from the dead, bare record.

 

18 For this cause the people also met him, for that they heard that he had done this miracle.

 

19 The Pharisees therefore said among themselves, Perceive ye how ye prevail nothing? behold, the world is gone after him.

 

 

From Luke 19:

 

36 And as he went, they spread their clothes in the way.

 

37 And when he was come nigh, even now at the descent of the mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen;

 

38 Saying, Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord: peace in heaven, and glory in the highest.

 

39 And some of the Pharisees from among the multitude said unto him, Master, rebuke thy disciples.

 

40 And he answered and said unto them, I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out.

 

41 And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it,

 

42 Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace! but now they are hid from thine eyes.

 

43 For the days shall come upon thee, that thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and compass thee round, and keep thee in on every side,

 

44 And shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee; and they shall not leave in thee one stone upon another; because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation.

 

 

It was in the Gospel of Matthew that the last sentence of today's reading appears:
 

 "...Who is this man?” And the multitude answered, “This is the prophet of Galilee, Jesus of Nazareth....” (1883.2) 172:3.16
 

 

Matthew 19:

 

10 And when he was come into Jerusalem, all the city was moved, saying, Who is this?

 

11 And the multitude said, This is Jesus the prophet of Nazareth of Galilee.

 

 

Many, many, are the artworks depicting this donkey-back ride into the Jerusalem:

 

Christ+enters+Jerusalem.JPG

IMAGE SOURCE

 

SSC-ingresso-vl.jpg

IMAGE SOURCE

 

jesus.donkey.jpg

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

***

 

Tomorrow's OPAD, Section 4. Visiting about the Temple, is a short one, just three paragraphs about Jesus and the apostles freely roaming the temple court, watching an old woman deposit her minute savings in the temple's collection plate, then leaving for the night, returning to Bethany and Bethpage.

 

 

Overview of Paper 172. Going into Jerusalem

 

1. Sabbath at Bethany

2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles

3. The Start for Jerusalem

4. Visiting about the Temple

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 172 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#11 Rick Warren

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 04:01 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 172 - Going into Jerusalem

 

4. Visiting about the Temple

 

 

      While the Alpheus twins returned the donkey to its owner, Jesus and the ten apostles detached themselves from their immediate associates and strolled about the temple, viewing the preparations for the Passover. No attempt was made to molest Jesus as the Sanhedrin greatly feared the people, and that was, after all, one of the reasons Jesus had for allowing the multitude thus to acclaim him. The apostles little understood that this was the only human procedure which could have been effective in preventing Jesus’ immediate arrest upon entering the city. The Master desired to give the inhabitants of Jerusalem, high and low, as well as the tens of thousands of Passover visitors, this one more and last chance to hear the gospel and receive, if they would, the Son of Peace.

 

(1883.4) 172:4.2 And now, as the evening drew on and the crowds went in quest of nourishment, Jesus and his immediate followers were left alone. What a strange day it had been! The apostles were thoughtful, but speechless. Never, in their years of association with Jesus, had they seen such a day. For a moment they sat down by the treasury, watching the people drop in their contributions: the rich putting much in the receiving box and all giving something in accordance with the extent of their possessions. At last there came along a poor widow, scantily attired, and they observed as she cast two mites (small coppers) into the trumpet. And then said Jesus, calling the attention of the apostles to the widow: “Heed well what you have just seen. This poor widow cast in more than all the others, for all these others, from their superfluity, cast in some trifle as a gift, but this poor woman, even though she is in want, gave all that she had, even her living.”

 

(1883.5) 172:4.3 As the evening drew on, they walked about the temple courts in silence, and after Jesus had surveyed these familiar scenes once more, recalling his emotions in connection with previous visits, not excepting the earlier ones, he said, “Let us go up to Bethany for our rest.” Jesus, with Peter and John, went to the home of Simon, while the other apostles lodged among their friends in Bethany and Bethpage.

 

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#12 Rick Warren

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 04:43 AM

.

 

Good Day Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

Jesus must surely have known in his heart of hearts that he would be rejected by the priesthood no matter how many last chances. But no telling how many onlookers were brought into the kingdom because he stretched this last week out, avoiding arrest until Thursday night.

 

His great heart wanted to give them:

 

...one more and last chance to hear the gospel and receive, if they would, the Son of Peace.... (1883.3) 172:4.1

 

***

 

The Master's entry into Jerusalem, his noting the widow's tiny contribution, and their departure for Bethany were recorded by two of the Gospel writers:

 

From Mark 11:

 

11 And Jesus entered into Jerusalem, and into the temple: and when he had looked round about upon all things, and now the eventide was come, he went out unto Bethany with the twelve.

 

From Mark 12:

 

41 And Jesus sat over against the treasury, and beheld how the people cast money into the treasury: and many that were rich cast in much.

42 And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing.

43 And he called unto him his disciples, and saith unto them, Verily I say unto you, That this poor widow hath cast more in, than all they which have cast into the treasury:

44 For all they did cast in of their abundance; but she of her want did cast in all that she had, even all her living.

 

From Luke 21:

 

1 And he looked up, and saw the rich men casting their gifts into the treasury.

2 And he saw also a certain poor widow casting in thither two mites.

3 And he said, Of a truth I say unto you, that this poor widow hath cast in more than they all:

4 For all these have of their abundance cast in unto the offerings of God: but she of her penury hath cast in all the living that she had.

 

Harold_Copping_The_Widows_Mite_400.jpg

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

 

friendlp.nfo:o:10a2.jpg

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

widows-mite-300x152.jpg

 

A bronze mite, also known as a Lepton (meaning small), minted by Alexander Jannaeus, King of Judaea, 103 - 76 B.C. obverse: the blooming lotus scepter of ancient Egypt in circle, reverse: star of eight rays.

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

***

 

Later on, some strange lessons were drawn from this incident by certain Christian sects. From Wikipedia:

 

In earlier times, a number of Christians argued that the passage is an encouragement to live in poverty, and not seek riches.

 

In the passage immediately preceding this in both gospel accounts, Jesus is portrayed as condemning the religious leaders who feign piety, accept honor from people, and steal from widows (perhaps feigning piety in order to gain the trust of widows, and thereby gain access to their assets). Although most Christians understand this as criticism of the actions of certain individuals, racist groups have historically argued that the passages in question justify anti-semitism, particularly as the Gospel of Mark argues that severe punishment awaits those who follow such actions.

 

 

***

 

Tomorrow's reading, the first half of Section 5. The Apostles’ Attitude, is the record of the feelings and disposition of each apostle, in the order of their original selection: Andrew, Peter, the two Zebedees, John and James, Philip and Nathaniel.

 

Overview of Paper 172. Going into Jerusalem

 

1. Sabbath at Bethany

2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles

3. The Start for Jerusalem

4. Visiting about the Temple

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 172 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#13 Rick Warren

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 04:42 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 172 - Going into Jerusalem

 

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

[Part 1 of 2]

 

   This Sunday evening as they returned to Bethany, Jesus walked in front of the apostles. Not a word was spoken until they separated after arriving at Simon’s house. No twelve human beings ever experienced such diverse and inexplicable emotions as now surged through the minds and souls of these ambassadors of the kingdom. These sturdy Galileans were confused and disconcerted; they did not know what to expect next; they were too surprised to be much afraid. They knew nothing of the Master’s plans for the next day, and they asked no questions. They went to their lodgings, though they did not sleep much, save the twins. But they did not keep armed watch over Jesus at Simon’s house.

 

(1884.1) 172:5.2 Andrew was thoroughly bewildered, well-nigh confused. He was the one apostle who did not seriously undertake to evaluate the popular outburst of acclaim. He was too preoccupied with the thought of his responsibility as chief of the apostolic corps to give serious consideration to the meaning or significance of the loud hosannas of the multitude. Andrew was busy watching some of his associates who he feared might be led away by their emotions during the excitement, particularly Peter, James, John, and Simon Zelotes. Throughout this day and those which immediately followed, Andrew was troubled with serious doubts, but he never expressed any of these misgivings to his apostolic associates. He was concerned about the attitude of some of the twelve who he knew were armed with swords; but he did not know that his own brother, Peter, was carrying such a weapon. And so the procession into Jerusalem made a comparatively superficial impression upon Andrew; he was too busy with the responsibilities of his office to be otherwise affected.*

 

(1884.2) 172:5.3 Simon Peter was at first almost swept off his feet by this popular manifestation of enthusiasm; but he was considerably sobered by the time they returned to Bethany that night. Peter simply could not figure out what the Master was about. He was terribly disappointed that Jesus did not follow up this wave of popular favor with some kind of a pronouncement. Peter could not understand why Jesus did not speak to the multitude when they arrived at the temple, or at least permit one of the apostles to address the crowd. Peter was a great preacher, and he disliked to see such a large, receptive, and enthusiastic audience go to waste. He would so much have liked to preach the gospel of the kingdom to that throng right there in the temple; but the Master had specifically charged them that they were to do no teaching or preaching while in Jerusalem this Passover week. The reaction from the spectacular procession into the city was disastrous to Simon Peter; by night he was sobered and inexpressibly saddened.

 

(1884.3) 172:5.4 To James Zebedee, this Sunday was a day of perplexity and profound confusion; he could not grasp the purport of what was going on; he could not comprehend the Master’s purpose in permitting this wild acclaim and then in refusing to say a word to the people when they arrived at the temple. As the procession moved down Olivet toward Jerusalem, more especially when they were met by the thousands of pilgrims who poured forth to welcome the Master, James was cruelly torn by his conflicting emotions of elation and gratification at what he saw and by his profound feeling of fear as to what would happen when they reached the temple. And then was he downcast and overcome by disappointment when Jesus climbed off the donkey and proceeded to walk leisurely about the temple courts. James could not understand the reason for throwing away such a magnificent opportunity to proclaim the kingdom. By night, his mind was held firmly in the grip of a distressing and dreadful uncertainty.

 

(1884.4) 172:5.5 John Zebedee came somewhere near understanding why Jesus did this; at least he grasped in part the spiritual significance of this so-called triumphal entry into Jerusalem. As the multitude moved on toward the temple, and as John beheld his Master sitting there astride the colt, he recalled hearing Jesus onetime quote the passage of Scripture, the utterance of Zechariah, which described the coming of the Messiah as a man of peace and riding into Jerusalem on an ass. As John turned this Scripture over in his mind, he began to comprehend the symbolic significance of this Sunday-afternoon pageant. At least, he grasped enough of the meaning of this Scripture to enable him somewhat to enjoy the episode and to prevent his becoming overmuch depressed by the apparent purposeless ending of the triumphal procession. John had a type of mind which naturally tended to think and feel in symbols.

 

(1885.1) 172:5.6 Philip was entirely unsettled by the suddenness and spontaneity of the outburst. He could not collect his thoughts sufficiently while on the way down Olivet to arrive at any settled notion as to what all the demonstration was about. In a way, he enjoyed the performance because his Master was being honored. By the time they reached the temple, he was perturbed by the thought that Jesus might possibly ask him to feed the multitude, so that the conduct of Jesus in turning leisurely away from the crowds, which so sorely disappointed the majority of the apostles, was a great relief to Philip. Multitudes had sometimes been a great trial to the steward of the twelve. After he was relieved of these personal fears regarding the material needs of the crowds, Philip joined with Peter in the expression of disappointment that nothing was done to teach the multitude. That night Philip got to thinking over these experiences and was tempted to doubt the whole idea of the kingdom; he honestly wondered what all these things could mean, but he expressed his doubts to no one; he loved Jesus too much. He had great personal faith in the Master.

 

(1885.2) 172:5.7 Nathaniel, aside from the symbolic and prophetic aspects, came the nearest to understanding the Master’s reason for enlisting the popular support of the Passover pilgrims. He reasoned it out, before they reached the temple, that without such a demonstrative entry into Jerusalem Jesus would have been arrested by the Sanhedrin officials and cast into prison the moment he presumed to enter the city. He was not, therefore, in the least surprised that the Master made no further use of the cheering crowds when he had once got inside the walls of the city and had thus so forcibly impressed the Jewish leaders that they would refrain from placing him under immediate arrest. Understanding the real reason for the Master’s entering the city in this manner, Nathaniel naturally followed along with more poise and was less perturbed and disappointed by Jesus’ subsequent conduct than were the other apostles. Nathaniel had great confidence in Jesus’ understanding of men as well as in his sagacity and cleverness in handling difficult situations.

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#14 Rick Warren

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 05:42 AM

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Greetings Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

From today's reading:

 

...This Sunday evening as they returned to Bethany.... (1883.6) 172:5.1

 

James_Tissot_Jesus_Goes_Out_To_Bethany_I

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

Poor apostles! How could these unlettered, unspiritual humans of that time and place even begin to understand the motivations and doings of being who has been alive and serving God faithfully for billions upon billions of years? And who was, apparently, about to blithely march into the jaws of defeat and ignominy?

 

From the first paragraph of today's OPAD:

 

...These sturdy Galileans were confused and disconcerted; they did not know what to expect next; they were too surprised to be much afraid.... (1883.6) 172:5.1

 

 

Andrew's highest thoughts and biggest concerns were about his eleven associates:

 

...he was too busy with the responsibilities of his office to be otherwise affected.... (1884.1) 172:5.2

 

 

Evidently they all wore more than one layer of clothing, because Andrew:

 

...did not know that his own brother, Peter, was carrying such a weapon.... (1884.1) 172:5.2

 

A sword is hard to hide without many layers. Maybe the picture above is somewhat accurate...

 

 

***

 

What a waste of preaching opportunity, thought Peter (with a sword under his garment):

 

...Peter simply could not figure out what the Master was about.... (1884.2) 172:5.3

 

 

James and Peter were of like mind:

 

...he could not comprehend the Master’s purpose in permitting this wild acclaim and then in refusing to say a word to the people.... (1884.3) 172:5.4

 

John Z was a little bit more discerning, thanks to his memory of Zechariah's verse:

 

...he recalled hearing Jesus onetime quote the passage of Scripture, the utterance of Zechariah, which described the coming of the Messiah as a man of peace and riding into Jerusalem on an ass.... (1884.4) 172:5.5

 

From Zechariah 9:

 

9 Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: he is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass.

 

 

It's noteworthy that John alluded to the apostles' attitude when he later wrote his Gospel, in chapter 12:

 

16 These things understood not his disciples at the first: but when Jesus was glorified, then remembered they that these things were written of him, and that they had done these things unto him.

 

 

Evidently Thomas was not the only apostle who had to deal with doubt:

 

...Philip got to thinking over these experiences and was tempted to doubt the whole idea of the kingdom.... (1885.1) 172:5.6

 

 

But Philip's belief pulled him thru:

 

...he expressed his doubts to no one; he loved Jesus too much. He had great personal faith in the Master..... (1885.1) 172:5.6

 

 

Only Nathaniel the genius deduced the real intentions and true motives behind Jesus' acts:

 

...He reasoned it out, before they reached the temple, that without such a demonstrative entry into Jerusalem Jesus would have been arrested by the Sanhedrin officials and cast into prison the moment he presumed to enter the city.... (1885.2) 172:5.7

 

 

***

 

Tomorrow's reading, the last half of Section 5. The Apostles’ Attitude, and the end of Paper 172, is about how the other six are feeling at this peculiar, seemingly inexplicable point, here at the end of their time with the Master.

 

Overview of Paper 172. Going into Jerusalem

 

1. Sabbath at Bethany

2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles

3. The Start for Jerusalem

4. Visiting about the Temple

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 172 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#15 Rick Warren

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 05:22 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 172 - Going into Jerusalem

 

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

[Part 2 of 2]

 

 

   Matthew was at first nonplused by this pageant performance. He did not grasp the meaning of what his eyes were seeing until he also recalled the Scripture in Zechariah where the prophet had alluded to the rejoicing of Jerusalem because her king had come bringing salvation and riding upon the colt of an ass. As the procession moved in the direction of the city and then drew on toward the temple, Matthew became ecstatic; he was certain that something extraordinary would happen when the Master arrived at the temple at the head of this shouting multitude. When one of the Pharisees mocked Jesus, saying, “Look, everybody, see who comes here, the king of the Jews riding on an ass!” Matthew kept his hands off of him only by exercising great restraint. None of the twelve was more depressed on the way back to Bethany that evening. Next to Simon Peter and Simon Zelotes, he experienced the highest nervous tension and was in a state of exhaustion by night. But by morning Matthew was much cheered; he was, after all, a cheerful loser.

 

(1886.1) 172:5.9 Thomas was the most bewildered and puzzled man of all the twelve. Most of the time he just followed along, gazing at the spectacle and honestly wondering what could be the Master’s motive for participating in such a peculiar demonstration. Down deep in his heart he regarded the whole performance as a little childish, if not downright foolish. He had never seen Jesus do anything like this and was at a loss to account for his strange conduct on this Sunday afternoon. By the time they reached the temple, Thomas had deduced that the purpose of this popular demonstration was so to frighten the Sanhedrin that they would not dare immediately to arrest the Master. On the way back to Bethany Thomas thought much but said nothing. By bedtime the Master’s cleverness in staging the tumultuous entry into Jerusalem had begun to make a somewhat humorous appeal, and he was much cheered up by this reaction.

 

(1886.2) 172:5.10 This Sunday started off as a great day for Simon Zelotes. He saw visions of wonderful doings in Jerusalem the next few days, and in that he was right, but Simon dreamed of the establishment of the new national rule of the Jews, with Jesus on the throne of David. Simon saw the nationalists springing into action as soon as the kingdom was announced, and himself in supreme command of the assembling military forces of the new kingdom. On the way down Olivet he even envisaged the Sanhedrin and all of their sympathizers dead before sunset of that day. He really believed something great was going to happen. He was the noisiest man in the whole multitude. By five o’clock that afternoon he was a silent, crushed, and disillusioned apostle. He never fully recovered from the depression which settled down on him as a result of this day’s shock; at least not until long after the Master’s resurrection.

 

(1886.3) 172:5.11 To the Alpheus twins this was a perfect day. They really enjoyed it all the way through, and not being present during the time of quiet visitation about the temple, they escaped much of the anticlimax of the popular upheaval. They could not possibly understand the downcast behavior of the apostles when they came back to Bethany that evening. In the memory of the twins this was always their day of being nearest heaven on earth. This day was the satisfying climax of their whole career as apostles. And the memory of the elation of this Sunday afternoon carried them on through all of the tragedy of this eventful week, right up to the hour of the crucifixion. It was the most befitting entry of the king the twins could conceive; they enjoyed every moment of the whole pageant. They fully approved of all they saw and long cherished the memory.

 

(1886.4) 172:5.12 Of all the apostles, Judas Iscariot was the most adversely affected by this processional entry into Jerusalem. His mind was in a disagreeable ferment because of the Master’s rebuke the preceding day in connection with Mary’s anointing at the feast in Simon’s house. Judas was disgusted with the whole spectacle. To him it seemed childish, if not indeed ridiculous. As this vengeful apostle looked upon the proceedings of this Sunday afternoon, Jesus seemed to him more to resemble a clown than a king. He heartily resented the whole performance. He shared the views of the Greeks and Romans, who looked down upon anyone who would consent to ride upon an ass or the colt of an ass. By the time the triumphal procession had entered the city, Judas had about made up his mind to abandon the whole idea of such a kingdom; he was almost resolved to forsake all such farcical attempts to establish the kingdom of heaven. And then he thought of the resurrection of Lazarus, and many other things, and decided to stay on with the twelve, at least for another day. Besides, he carried the bag, and he would not desert with the apostolic funds in his possession. On the way back to Bethany that night his conduct did not seem strange since all of the apostles were equally downcast and silent.

 

(1887.1) 172:5.13 Judas was tremendously influenced by the ridicule of his Sadducean friends. No other single factor exerted such a powerful influence on him, in his final determination to forsake Jesus and his fellow apostles, as a certain episode which occurred just as Jesus reached the gate of the city: A prominent Sadducee (a friend of Judas’s family) rushed up to him in a spirit of gleeful ridicule and, slapping him on the back, said: “Why so troubled of countenance, my good friend; cheer up and join us all while we acclaim this Jesus of Nazareth the king of the Jews as he rides through the gates of Jerusalem seated on an ass.” Judas had never shrunk from persecution, but he could not stand this sort of ridicule. With the long-nourished emotion of revenge there was now blended this fatal fear of ridicule, that terrible and fearful feeling of being ashamed of his Master and his fellow apostles. At heart, this ordained ambassador of the kingdom was already a deserter; it only remained for him to find some plausible excuse for an open break with the Master.

 

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#16 Rick Warren

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 06:18 AM

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Good Day Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

Matthew the "money getter" and Thomas "the doubter" both understood later, but what a trial it must have been for them during the Master's entry on an ass! Matthew was ready to fight, and Thomas was judging and doubting.

 

Simon, "the zealot" was, as usual, wanting war. From today's reading:

 

...He never fully recovered from the depression which settled down on him as a result of this day’s shock; at least not until long after the Master’s resurrection.... (1886.2) 172:5.10

 

We get more details about Simon Z's despondency and eventual recovery in Paper 192:

 

...Jesus visited with the ten apostles and John Mark for more than an hour, and then he walked up and down the beach, talking with them two and two — but not the same couples he had at first sent out together to teach. All eleven of the apostles had come down from Jerusalem together, but Simon Zelotes grew more and more despondent as they drew near Galilee, so that, when they reached Bethsaida, he forsook his brethren and returned to his home. (2047.3) 192:1.10

 

Before taking leave of them this morning, Jesus directed that two of the apostles should volunteer to go to Simon Zelotes and bring him back that very day. And Peter and Andrew did so. (2047.4) 192:1.11

 

...This remark spread among the brethren and was received as a statement by Jesus to the effect that John would not die before the Master returned, as many thought and hoped, to establish the kingdom in power and glory. It was this interpretation of what Jesus said that had much to do with getting Simon Zelotes back into service, and keeping him at work.... (2048.2) 192:2.6

 

 

The twins were always in a blissful world all their own, weren't they!

 

...In the memory of the twins this was always their day of being nearest heaven on earth. This day was the satisfying climax of their whole career as apostles.... (1886.3) 172:5.11

 

 

Judas Iscariot was in another world too, but his was one of resentment and vengeance. There is much more about his betrayal and suicide in the concluding Papers. This is from today's reading:

 

...With the long-nourished emotion of revenge there was now blended this fatal fear of ridicule, that terrible and fearful feeling of being ashamed of his Master and his fellow apostles.... (1887.1) 172:5.13

 

From Paper 193:

 

...That Judas need not have gone wrong is well proved by the cases of Thomas and Nathaniel, both of whom were cursed with this same sort of suspicion and overdevelopment of the individualistic tendency. Even Andrew and Matthew had many leanings in this direction; but all these men grew to love Jesus and their fellow apostles more, and not less, as time passed. They grew in grace and in a knowledge of the truth. They became increasingly more trustful of their brethren and slowly developed the ability to confide in their fellows. Judas persistently refused to confide in his brethren. When he was impelled, by the accumulation of his emotional conflicts, to seek relief in self-expression, he invariably sought the advice and received the unwise consolation of his unspiritual relatives or those chance acquaintances who were either indifferent, or actually hostile, to the welfare and progress of the spiritual realities of the heavenly kingdom, of which he was one of the twelve consecrated ambassadors on earth.... (2056.1) 193:4.3

 

...As a result of his persistent isolation of personality, his griefs multiplied, his sorrows increased, his anxieties augmented, and his despair deepened almost beyond endurance.... (2056.10) 193:4.12

 

TheHangingOfJudasIscariot.jpg

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

***

 

Tomorrow's reading is the introduction to Paper 173 Monday in Jerusalem. Jesus and his band leave Bethany for the temple. The apostles don't know what to think or say, so they follow along until the Master takes a podium, then wait and watch.

 

Overview of Paper 172. Going into Jerusalem

 

1. Sabbath at Bethany

2. Sunday Morning with the Apostles

3. The Start for Jerusalem

4. Visiting about the Temple

5. The Apostles’ Attitude

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 172 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.





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