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PAPER 171 - ON THE WAY TO JERUSALEM


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#21 Rick Warren

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 10:26 AM

 

Do you mean Jesus smiling on a man today?  Absolutely!  Isn't that the meaning of this quote:

 

100:7.18 Jesus was the perfectly unified human personality. And today, as in Galilee, he continues to unify mortal experience and to co-ordinate human endeavors. He unifies life, ennobles character, and simplifies experience. He enters the human mind to elevate, transform, and transfigure it. It is literally true: "If any man has Christ Jesus within him, he is a new creature; old things are passing away; behold, all things are becoming new."

 

As for a fellow creature smiling on another creature and increasing their capacity to solve problems, I also think is absolutely possible if they have Jesus in them.  Isn't that the meaning of this quote:

 

194:3.1 When man yields the "fruits of the spirit" in his life, he is simply showing forth the traits which the Master manifested in his own earthly life. When Jesus was on earth, he lived his life as one personality--Jesus of Nazareth. As the indwelling spirit of the "new teacher," the Master has, since Pentecost, been able to live his life anew in the experience of every truth-taught believer.

 

Yes!



#22 Bonita

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 10:58 AM

What do you suppose Jesus' smile did/does for people that enabled them to solve their own problems?  I try to imagine Jesus smiling on me when I'm perplexed and something real does happen.  I'm thinking it's some kind of confidence, a recognition of the powers within the soul.  What do you think?  



#23 Rick Warren

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 11:36 AM

  I'm thinking it's some kind of confidence, a recognition of the powers within the soul. What do you think?

 

Can't think of a better way to say it. And there's the I've-been-through-it factor, big brotherly encouragement to kept going and keep your chin up.



#24 Bonita

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 04:07 PM

So . . .  he inspires confidence in yourself (self-respect) and confidence in Jesus' dependability as a friend who will stick with you through it all.  Isn't that the crux of faith-trust?  It is really beautiful, I have to agree.



#25 Rick Warren

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 05:23 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 171 - On the Way to Jerusalem

 

8. Parable of the Pounds

 

 

   They did not start from Jericho until near noon since they sat up late the night before while Jesus taught Zaccheus and his family the gospel of the kingdom. About halfway up the ascending road to Bethany the party paused for lunch while the multitude passed on to Jerusalem, not knowing that Jesus and the apostles were going to abide that night on the Mount of Olives.

 

(1875.7) 171:8.2 The parable of the pounds, unlike the parable of the talents, which was intended for all the disciples, was spoken more exclusively to the apostles and was largely based on the experience of Archelaus and his futile attempt to gain the rule of the kingdom of Judea. This is one of the few parables of the Master to be founded on an actual historic character. It was not strange that they should have had Archelaus in mind inasmuch as the house of Zaccheus in Jericho was very near the ornate palace of Archelaus, and his aqueduct ran along the road by which they had departed from Jericho.

 

(1875.8) 171:8.3 Said Jesus: “You think that the Son of Man goes up to Jerusalem to receive a kingdom, but I declare that you are doomed to disappointment. Do you not remember about a certain prince who went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, but even before he could return, the citizens of his province, who in their hearts had already rejected him, sent an embassy after him, saying, ‘We will not have this man to reign over us’? As this king was rejected in the temporal rule, so is the Son of Man to be rejected in the spiritual rule. Again I declare that my kingdom is not of this world; but if the Son of Man had been accorded the spiritual rule of his people, he would have accepted such a kingdom of men’s souls and would have reigned over such a dominion of human hearts. Notwithstanding that they reject my spiritual rule over them, I will return again to receive from others such a kingdom of spirit as is now denied me. You will see the Son of Man rejected now, but in another age that which the children of Abraham now reject will be received and exalted.

 

(1876.1) 171:8.4 “And now, as the rejected nobleman of this parable, I would call before me my twelve servants, special stewards, and giving into each of your hands the sum of one pound, I would admonish each to heed well my instructions that you trade diligently with your trust fund while I am away that you may have wherewith to justify your stewardship when I return, when a reckoning shall be required of you.

 

(1876.2) 171:8.5 “And even if this rejected Son should not return, another Son will be sent to receive this kingdom, and this Son will then send for all of you to receive your report of stewardship and to be made glad by your gains.

 

(1876.3) 171:8.6 “And when these stewards were subsequently called together for an accounting, the first came forward, saying, ‘Lord, with your pound I have made ten pounds more.’ And his master said to him: ‘Well done; you are a good servant; because you have proved faithful in this matter, I will give you authority over ten cities.’ And the second came, saying, ‘Your pound left with me, Lord, has made five pounds.’ And the master said, ‘I will accordingly make you ruler over five cities.’ And so on down through the others until the last of the servants, on being called to account, reported: ‘Lord, behold, here is your pound, which I have kept safely done up in this napkin. And this I did because I feared you; I believed that you were unreasonable, seeing that you take up where you have not laid down, and that you seek to reap where you have not sown.’ Then said his lord: ‘You negligent and unfaithful servant, I will judge you out of your own mouth. You knew that I reap where I have apparently not sown; therefore you knew this reckoning would be required of you. Knowing this, you should have at least given my money to the banker that at my coming I might have had it with proper interest.’

 

(1876.4) 171:8.7 “And then said this ruler to those who stood by: ‘Take the money from this slothful servant and give it to him who has ten pounds.’ And when they reminded the master that such a one already had ten pounds, he said: ‘To every one who has shall be given more, but from him who has not, even that which he has shall be taken away from him.’”

(1876.5) 171:8.8 And then the apostles sought to know the difference between the meaning of this parable and that of the former parable of the talents, but Jesus would only say, in answer to their many questions: “Ponder well these words in your hearts while each of you finds out their true meaning.”

 

(1876.6) 171:8.9 It was Nathaniel who so well taught the meaning of these two parables in the after years, summing up his teachings in these conclusions:

 

1. Ability is the practical measure of life’s opportunities. You will never be held responsible for the accomplishment of that which is beyond your abilities.

 

2. Faithfulness is the unerring measure of human trustworthiness. He who is faithful in little things is also likely to exhibit faithfulness in everything consistent with his endowments.

 

3. The Master grants the lesser reward for lesser faithfulness when there is like opportunity.

 

4. He grants a like reward for like faithfulness when there is lesser opportunity.

 

(1877.2) 171:8.14 When they had finished their lunch, and after the multitude of followers had gone on toward Jerusalem, Jesus, standing there before the apostles in the shade of an overhanging rock by the roadside, with cheerful dignity and a gracious majesty pointed his finger westward, saying: “Come, my brethren, let us go on into Jerusalem, there to receive that which awaits us; thus shall we fulfill the will of the heavenly Father in all things.”

 

(1877.3) 171:8.15 And so Jesus and his apostles resumed this, the Master’s last journey to Jerusalem in the likeness of the flesh of mortal man.

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#26 Rick Warren

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 07:01 AM

.

Greetings Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

The first paragraph mentions Jericho and the Mount of Olives (aka Olivet). These maps are from Urantia Foundation's series: IN HIS STEPS

 

map-32-735px.jpg?1402517808

 

A little closer view:

 

map-33-735px.jpg?1402517872

 

 

***

 

From the second paragraph of today's reading:

 

...The parable of the pounds, unlike the parable of the talents, which was intended for all the disciples, was spoken more exclusively to the apostles.... (1875.7) 171:8.2

 

See Paper 176:3 for the talents parable:

 

“...As individuals, and as a generation of believers, hear me while I speak a parable: There was a certain great man who, before starting out on a long journey to another country, called all his trusted servants before him and delivered into their hands all his goods. To one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one. And so on down through the entire group of honored stewards, to each he intrusted his goods according to their several abilities; and then he set out on his journey. When their lord had departed, his servants set themselves at work to gain profits from the wealth intrusted to them. Immediately he who had received five talents began to trade with them and very soon had made a profit of another five talents. In like manner he who had received two talents soon had gained two more. And so did all of these servants make gains for their master except him who received but one talent. He went away by himself and dug a hole in the earth where he hid his lord’s money. Presently the lord of those servants unexpectedly returned and called upon his stewards for a reckoning. And when they had all been called before their master, he who had received the five talents came forward with the money which had been intrusted to him and brought five additional talents, saying, ‘Lord, you gave me five talents to invest, and I am glad to present five other talents as my gain.’ And then his lord said to him: ‘Well done, good and faithful servant, you have been faithful over a few things; I will now set you as steward over many; enter forthwith into the joy of your lord.’ And then he who had received the two talents came forward, saying: ‘Lord, you delivered into my hands two talents; behold, I have gained these other two talents.’ And his lord then said to him: ‘Well done, good and faithful steward; you also have been faithful over a few things, and I will now set you over many; enter you into the joy of your lord.’ And then there came to the accounting he who had received the one talent. This servant came forward, saying, ‘Lord, I knew you and realized that you were a shrewd man in that you expected gains where you had not personally labored; therefore was I afraid to risk aught of that which was intrusted to me. I safely hid your talent in the earth; here it is; you now have what belongs to you.’ But his lord answered: ‘You are an indolent and slothful steward. By your own words you confess that you knew I would require of you an accounting with reasonable profit, such as your diligent fellow servants have this day rendered. Knowing this, you ought, therefore, to have at least put my money into the hands of the bankers that on my return I might have received my own with interest.’ And then to the chief steward this lord said: ‘Take away this one talent from this unprofitable servant and give it to him who has the ten talents....’ (1916.4) 176:3.4

 

 

About Achelaus, cited in today's reading:

 

...The parable of the pounds...was largely based on the experience of Archelaus and his futile attempt to gain the rule of the kingdom of Judea.... (1875.7) 171:8.2

 

He was another of the mad sons of Herod. From Wikipedia:

 

Herod Archelaus (23 BC – c. 18 AD) was the ethnarch of Samaria, Judea, and Idumea from 4 BC to 6 AD. He was the son of Herod the Great and Malthace the Samaritan, the brother of Herod Antipas, and the half-brother of Herod Philip I.

 

Archelaus killed 40 young Jews over a temple desecration incident, then 3000 more in a follow up:

 

...Thus, Archelaus received the Tetrarchy of Judea last will of his father, though a previous will had bequeathed it to his brother Antipas. He was proclaimed king by the army, but declined to assume the title until he had submitted his claims to Caesar Augustus in Rome. In Rome he was opposed by Antipas and by many of the Jews, who feared his cruelty, based on the murder of 3000; but in 4 AD Augustus allotted to him the greater part of the kingdom (Samaria, Judea, and Idumea) with the title of ethnarch (not king) until 6 AD when Judaea province was formed, under direct Roman rule, at the time of the Census of Quirinius.

 

The first wife of Archelaus is given by Josephus simply as Mariamne, perhaps Mariamne III (Mariamne bint Aristobulus), whom he divorced to marry Glaphyra. She was the widow of Archelaus' brother Alexander, though her second husband, Juba, king of Mauretania, was alive. This violation of the Mosaic law, along with Archelaus' continued cruelty, roused the ire of the Jews, who complained to Augustus. Archelaus was deposed in 6 AD and banished to Vienne in Gaul. Samaria, Judea proper, and Idumea became the Roman province of Iudaea.

 

SOURCE/MORE

 

 

 

***

 

Hmm...must be missing something. Today's reading says the talent parable was "former":

 

...And then the apostles sought to know the difference between the meaning of this parable and that of the former parable of the talents... (1876.5) 171:8.8

 

But the talents parable isn't told until Paper 176, on Tuesday evening before his death on Friday, April 7. Any guesses what's missing?

 

***

 

This is how the parable is recorded in Luke, and only Luke (looks like someone added the "slay me" command in verse 27):

 

From Luke 19:

 

11 And as they heard these things, he added and spake a parable, because he was nigh to Jerusalem, and because they thought that the kingdom of God should immediately appear.

 

12 He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.

 

13 And he called his ten servants, and delivered them ten pounds, and said unto them, Occupy till I come.

 

14 But his citizens hated him, and sent a message after him, saying, We will not have this man to reign over us.

 

15 And it came to pass, that when he was returned, having received the kingdom, then he commanded these servants to be called unto him, to whom he had given the money, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading.

 

16 Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds.

 

17 And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities.

 

18 And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained five pounds.

 

19 And he said likewise to him, Be thou also over five cities.

 

20 And another came, saying, Lord, behold, here is thy pound, which I have kept laid up in a napkin:

 

21 For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man: thou takest up that thou layedst not down, and reapest that thou didst not sow.

 

22 And he saith unto him, Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant. Thou knewest that I was an austere man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that I did not sow:

 

23 Wherefore then gavest not thou my money into the bank, that at my coming I might have required mine own with usury?

 

24 And he said unto them that stood by, Take from him the pound, and give it to him that hath ten pounds.

 

25 (And they said unto him, Lord, he hath ten pounds.)

 

26 For I say unto you, That unto every one which hath shall be given; and from him that hath not, even that he hath shall be taken away from him.

 

27 But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither, and slay them before me.

 

28 And when he had thus spoken, he went before, ascending up to Jerusalem.

 

 

Compare that last verse with the end of Paper 171:

 

...And so Jesus and his apostles resumed this, the Master’s last journey to Jerusalem in the likeness of the flesh of mortal man....(1877.3) 171:8.15

 

***

 

Tomorrow's reading is the introduction to Paper 172: Going into Jerusalem. Jesus and the apostles move to Bethany and stay with Lazurus' neighbor, Simon. The priests decide to wait to arrest him when he enters Jerusalem.

 

Overview of Paper 171: On the Way to Jerusalem

 

1. The Departure from Pella

2. On Counting the Cost

3. The Perean Tour

4. Teaching at Livias

5. The Blind Man at Jericho

6. The Visit to Zaccheus

7. “As Jesus Passed By”

8. Parable of the Pounds

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 171 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#27 Bonita

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 10:12 AM

 

 

Hmm...must be missing something. Today's reading says the talent parable was "former":

 

...And then the apostles sought to know the difference between the meaning of this parable and that of the former parable of the talents... (1876.5) 171:8.8

 

But the talents parable isn't told until Paper 176, on Tuesday evening before his death on Friday, April 7. Any guesses what's missing?

 

 

 

 

Perhaps they are referring to the parable in Paper 159.  Both parables are about kings, their stewards and money.  



#28 Rick Warren

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 10:37 AM

 

Perhaps they are referring to the parable in Paper 159.  Both parables are about kings, their stewards and money.  

 

Must be.





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