Jump to content


Photo

PAPER 169 - LAST TEACHINGS AT PELLA


18 replies to this topic

#1 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 29 May 2014 - 04:35 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

Today's Presentation

Paper 169 - Last Teaching at Pella

[INTRODUCTION]

   LATE on Monday evening, March 6, Jesus and the ten apostles arrived at the Pella camp. This was the last week of Jesus’ sojourn there, and he was very active in teaching the multitude and instructing the apostles. He preached every afternoon to the crowds and each night answered questions for the apostles and certain of the more advanced disciples residing at the camp.
 
(1850.2) 169:0.2 Word regarding the resurrection of Lazarus had reached the encampment two days before the Master’s arrival, and the entire assembly was agog. Not since the feeding of the five thousand had anything occurred which so aroused the imagination of the people. And thus it was at the very height of the second phase of the public ministry of the kingdom that Jesus planned to teach this one short week at Pella and then to begin the tour of southern Perea which led right up to the final and tragic experiences of the last week in Jerusalem.
 
(1850.3) 169:0.3 The Pharisees and the chief priests had begun to formulate their charges and to crystallize their accusations. They objected to the Master’s teachings on these grounds:
 
1. He is a friend of publicans and sinners; he receives the ungodly and even eats with them.
 
2. He is a blasphemer; he talks about God as being his Father and thinks he is equal with God.
 
3. He is a lawbreaker. He heals disease on the Sabbath and in many other ways flouts the sacred law of Israel.
 
4. He is in league with devils. He works wonders and does seeming miracles by the power of Beelzebub, the prince of devils.

 

 

 
***



 
 
[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]


#2 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 29 May 2014 - 06:03 AM

.

 

 

Greetings Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors!

 

Welcome to the OPAD presentation of Paper 169. It is relatively short, seven pages long with just four Sections:
 

Overview of Paper 169. Last Teaching at Pella


1. Parable of the Lost Son
2. Parable of the Shrewd Steward
3. The Rich Man and the Beggar
4. The Father and His Kingdom

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

 

This Paper spans five days, March 6-11 AD 30. About half of it is verbatim teaching from Jesus.

 

The remote Pella encampment had been in existence for months, it served as both refuge and as a training center.

 

From Wikipedia:

 

Pella is a village and the site of ancient ruins in northwestern Jordan.

 

Pella is located in the Jordan valley some 130 km north of Amman, and the site has been continuously occupied since Neolithic times. First mentioned in the 19th century BC in Egyptian inscriptions, its name was Hellenised to Pella, perhaps to honour Alexander the Great's birthplace. The Roman city, of which some spectacular ruins remain, supplanted the Hellenistic city. During this period Pella was one of the cities making up the Decapolis. The city was the site of one of Christianity's earliest churches. According to Eusebius of Caesarea it was a refuge for Jerusalem Christians in the 1st century AD who were fleeing the Jewish–Roman wars.

 

409px-Thedecapolis.png

 

TEXT/MAP SOURCE

 

 

Synopsis of Paper 169:
 

Jesus and the apostles returned to the camp at Pella, where the assembled crowds had already learned of the resurrection of Lazarus. Jesus preached in Pella, telling the stories of the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the prodigal son. He grouped these three stories together to demonstrate that God knows when we are lost, is diligent in his search for those who are lost, and that when a lost soul returns to God, he is accepted with joy.

 

Jesus taught that when people seek God, God is likewise seeking them. He said that there is more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents that in ninety-nine who need no repentance. Jesus emphasized that he and God actively search for lost souls and use every resource possible to find those in need of salvation.

 

One evening Jesus told the parable of the shrewd steward to illustrate to his followers that they should arrange their lives to provide for present joy as well as future enjoyment of the treasures in heaven. He said, "He who is faithful in little will also be faithful in much, while he who is unrighteous in little will also be unrighteous in much. If you have not shown foresight and integrity in the affairs of this world, how can you hope to be faithful and prudent when you are trusted with the stewardship of the true riches of the heavenly kingdom?"

 

Jesus always had trouble explaining to the apostles that the Father in heaven was not a king. People of Jesus' time were accustomed to kings and emperors, and Jewish lore had long told of the coming of the kingdom of God. For this reason, Jesus referred to the spiritual brotherhood as the kingdom of God, but he never referred to his Father as a king.

 

Synopsis Source

 

 

 

The Midwayers mention "southern Perea" in today's reading:

 

palest.gif

Map Source

 

 

 

And the Midwayers mention the "second phase of the public ministry" in the introduction to this Paper. The first phase was the more miraculous, with the feeding of the five thousand and the healing of many sick ones.

 

The Pharisees at Jerusalem were now determined to permanently silence this unwanted voice from above. But they needed to charge him with great crimes, therefore did they begin to formulate their accusations: fraternizing with sinners, dishonoring God, breaking Sabbath, and conspiring with "the devil". All that they were doing in fact!

 

 

In tomorrow's reading Jesus reminds his hearers of the parables of the lost sheep and the lost coin. He has less than one month to live as a man, and is making his final appeals to the minds and souls of his followers, trying to impress upon them that God WANTS us, that He and his Sons will never give up on us, unless we should give up wanting Him. 

 

 

Listen to Paper 169 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#3 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 30 May 2014 - 05:03 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

Today's Presentation

Paper 169 - Last Teaching at Pella

 
1. Parable of the Lost Son
 
[Part 1 of 2]

 

 
On Thursday afternoon Jesus talked to the multitude about the “Grace of Salvation.” In the course of this sermon he retold the story of the lost sheep and the lost coin and then added his favorite parable of the prodigal son. Said Jesus:
 
(1850.9) 169:1.2 “You have been admonished by the prophets from Samuel to John that you should seek for God — search for truth. Always have they said, ‘Seek the Lord while he may be found.’ And all such teaching should be taken to heart. But I have come to show you that, while you are seeking to find God, God is likewise seeking to find you. Many times have I told you the story of the good shepherd who left the ninety and nine sheep in the fold while he went forth searching for the one that was lost, and how, when he had found the straying sheep, he laid it over his shoulder and tenderly carried it back to the fold. And when the lost sheep had been restored to the fold, you remember that the good shepherd called in his friends and bade them rejoice with him over the finding of the sheep that had been lost. Again I say there is more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over the ninety and nine just persons who need no repentance. The fact that souls are lost only increases the interest of the heavenly Father. I have come to this world to do my Father’s bidding, and it has truly been said of the Son of Man that he is a friend of publicans and sinners.
 
(1851.1) 169:1.3 “You have been taught that divine acceptance comes after your repentance and as a result of all your works of sacrifice and penitence, but I assure you that the Father accepts you even before you have repented and sends the Son and his associates to find you and bring you, with rejoicing, back to the fold, the kingdom of sonship and spiritual progress. You are all like sheep which have gone astray, and I have come to seek and to save those who are lost.
 
(1851.2) 169:1.4 “And you should also remember the story of the woman who, having had ten pieces of silver made into a necklace of adornment, lost one piece, and how she lit the lamp and diligently swept the house and kept up the search until she found the lost piece of silver. And as soon as she found the coin that was lost, she called together her friends and neighbors, saying, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found the piece that was lost.’ So again I say, there is always joy in the presence of the angels of heaven over one sinner who repents and returns to the Father’s fold. And I tell you this story to impress upon you that the Father and his Son go forth to search for those who are lost, and in this search we employ all influences capable of rendering assistance in our diligent efforts to find those who are lost, those who stand in need of salvation. And so, while the Son of Man goes out in the wilderness to seek for the sheep gone astray, he also searches for the coin which is lost in the house. The sheep wanders away, unintentionally; the coin is covered by the dust of time and obscured by the accumulation of the things of men."
 
 



***

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]


#4 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 30 May 2014 - 06:09 AM

.

Good Day Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

Because of the New Testament record the parables of the lost sheep and coin--and the relentless search for them--have been circulating in Christianity all these centuries, ever since Jesus uttered them. Now we have them in a purer form, word for word from their author.

 

From today's reading:

 

“...Many times have I told you the story of the good shepherd who left the ninety and nine sheep in the fold while he went forth searching for the one that was lost, and how, when he had found the straying sheep, he laid it over his shoulder and tenderly carried it back to the fold...." (1850.9) 169:1.2

 

One of those times is recorded in Paper 159:

 

“...If a kindhearted man has a hundred sheep and one of them goes astray, does he not immediately leave the ninety and nine and go out in search of the one that has gone astray? And if he is a good shepherd, will he not keep up his quest for the lost sheep until he finds it? And then, when the shepherd has found his lost sheep, he lays it over his shoulder and, going home rejoicing, calls to his friends and neighbors, ‘Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep that was lost.’ I declare that there is more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety and nine righteous persons who need no repentance. Even so, it is not the will of my Father in heaven that one of these little ones should go astray, much less that they should perish. In your religion God may receive repentant sinners; in the gospel of the kingdom the Father goes forth to find them even before they have seriously thought of repentance...." (1762.4)159:1.2

 

Two of the Gospel books mention the lost sheep:

 

From Matthew 18:

 

11 For the Son of man is come to save that which was lost.

 

12 How think ye? if a man have an hundred sheep, and one of them be gone astray, doth he not leave the ninety and nine, and goeth into the mountains, and seeketh that which is gone astray?

 

13 And if so be that he find it, verily I say unto you, he rejoiceth more of that sheep, than of the ninety and nine which went not astray.

 

SBSR-1-69.jpg

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

But only Luke 15 has the parable of the lost sheep and coin:

 

3 And he spake this parable unto them, saying,

 

4 What man of you, having an hundred sheep, if he lose one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost, until he find it?

 

5 And when he hath found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing.

 

6 And when he cometh home, he calleth together his friends and neighbours, saying unto them, Rejoice with me; for I have found my sheep which was lost.

 

7 I say unto you, that likewise joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance.

 

8 Either what woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose one piece, doth not light a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it?

 

9 And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbours together, saying, Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I had lost.

 

10 Likewise, I say unto you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth.

 

Lost-coin.jpg

IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

In tomorrow's reading, the second half of Section 1. Parable of the Lost Son, Jesus delivers perhaps the most famous of all his parables. We are informed the prodigal son, the lost sheep and the lost coin, these three he often recited together, and that the lost son and the good Samaritan parables were his favorites for teaching love.

 

 

Overview of Paper 169. Last Teaching at Pella

 

1. Parable of the Lost Son

2. Parable of the Shrewd Steward

3. The Rich Man and the Beggar

4. The Father and His Kingdom

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 169 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#5 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 31 May 2014 - 04:37 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 169 - Last Teaching at Pella

 

1. Parable of the Lost Son

 

[Part 2 of 2]

 

 

   “And now I would like to tell you the story of a thoughtless son of a well-to-do farmer who deliberately left his father’s house and went off into a foreign land, where he fell into much tribulation. You recall that the sheep strayed away without intention, but this youth left his home with premeditation. It was like this:

 

(1851.4) 169:1.6 “A certain man had two sons; one, the younger, was lighthearted and carefree, always seeking for a good time and shirking responsibility, while his older brother was serious, sober, hard-working, and willing to bear responsibility. Now these two brothers did not get along well together; they were always quarreling and bickering. The younger lad was cheerful and vivacious, but indolent and unreliable; the older son was steady and industrious, at the same time self-centered, surly, and conceited. The younger son enjoyed play but shunned work; the older devoted himself to work but seldom played. This association became so disagreeable that the younger son came to his father and said: ‘Father, give me the third portion of your possessions which would fall to me and allow me to go out into the world to seek my own fortune.’ And when the father heard this request, knowing how unhappy the young man was at home and with his older brother, he divided his property, giving the youth his share.

 

(1851.5) 169:1.7 “Within a few weeks the young man gathered together all his funds and set out upon a journey to a far country, and finding nothing profitable to do which was also pleasurable, he soon wasted all his inheritance in riotous living. And when he had spent all, there arose a prolonged famine in that country, and he found himself in want. And so, when he suffered hunger and his distress was great, he found employment with one of the citizens of that country, who sent him into the fields to feed swine. And the young man would fain have filled himself with the husks which the swine ate, but no one would give him anything.

 

(1852.1) 169:1.8 “One day, when he was very hungry, he came to himself and said: ‘How many hired servants of my father have bread enough and to spare while I perish with hunger, feeding swine off here in a foreign country! I will arise and go to my father, and I will say to him: Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no more worthy to be called your son; only be willing to make me one of your hired servants.’ And when the young man had reached this decision, he arose and started out for his father’s house.

 

(1852.2) 169:1.9 “Now this father had grieved much for his son; he had missed the cheerful, though thoughtless, lad. This father loved this son and was always on the lookout for his return, so that on the day he approached his home, even while he was yet afar off, the father saw him and, being moved with loving compassion, ran out to meet him, and with affectionate greeting he embraced and kissed him. And after they had thus met, the son looked up into his father’s tearful face and said: ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and in your sight; I am no more worthy to be called a son’ — but the lad did not find opportunity to complete his confession because the overjoyed father said to the servants who had by this time come running up: ‘Bring quickly his best robe, the one I have saved, and put it on him and put the son’s ring on his hand and fetch sandals for his feet.’

 

(1852.3) 169:1.10 “And then, after the happy father had led the footsore and weary lad into the house, he called to his servants: ‘Bring on the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and make merry, for this my son was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.’ And they all gathered about the father to rejoice with him over the restoration of his son.

 

(1852.4) 169:1.11 “About this time, while they were celebrating, the elder son came in from his day’s work in the field, and as he drew near the house, he heard the music and the dancing. And when he came up to the back door, he called out one of the servants and inquired as to the meaning of all this festivity. And then said the servant: ‘Your long-lost brother has come home, and your father has killed the fatted calf to rejoice over his son’s safe return. Come in that you also may greet your brother and receive him back into your father’s house.’

 

(1852.5) 169:1.12 “But when the older brother heard this, he was so hurt and angry he would not go into the house. When his father heard of his resentment of the welcome of his younger brother, he went out to entreat him. But the older son would not yield to his father’s persuasion. He answered his father, saying: ‘Here these many years have I served you, never transgressing the least of your commands, and yet you never gave me even a kid that I might make merry with my friends. I have remained here to care for you all these years, and you never made rejoicing over my faithful service, but when this your son returns, having squandered your substance with harlots, you make haste to kill the fatted calf and make merry over him.’

 

(1852.6) 169:1.13 “Since this father truly loved both of his sons, he tried to reason with this older one: ‘But, my son, you have all the while been with me, and all this which I have is yours. You could have had a kid at any time you had made friends to share your merriment. But it is only proper that you should now join with me in being glad and merry because of your brother’s return. Think of it, my son, your brother was lost and is found; he has returned alive to us!’”

 

(1853.1) 169:1.14 This was one of the most touching and effective of all the parables which Jesus ever presented to impress upon his hearers the Father’s willingness to receive all who seek entrance into the kingdom of heaven.

 

(1853.2) 169:1.15 Jesus was very partial to telling these three stories at the same time. He presented the story of the lost sheep to show that, when men unintentionally stray away from the path of life, the Father is mindful of such lost ones and goes out, with his Sons, the true shepherds of the flock, to seek the lost sheep. He then would recite the story of the coin lost in the house to illustrate how thorough is the divine searching for all who are confused, confounded, or otherwise spiritually blinded by the material cares and accumulations of life. And then he would launch forth into the telling of this parable of the lost son, the reception of the returning prodigal, to show how complete is the restoration of the lost son into his Father’s house and heart.

 

(1853.3) 169:1.16 Many, many times during his years of teaching, Jesus told and retold this story of the prodigal son. This parable and the story of the good Samaritan were his favorite means of teaching the love of the Father and the neighborliness of man.

 

 

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#6 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 31 May 2014 - 05:35 AM

.

 

Greetings Alina, Bonita, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

How very close this story is to my own, at least the selfish, "riotous" living, and returning home, parts. Many of us live out the prodigal child story in one way or another, don't we?!

 

Question about this:

 

“...A certain man had two sons...This association became so disagreeable that the younger son came to his father and said: ‘Father, give me the third portion of your possessions which would fall to me...." (1851.4) 169:1.6

 

Why do you think his portion was a third when the man had but two sons? Maybe a third went to the state or temple??

 

***

 

“...And the young man would fain have filled himself with the husks which the swine ate, but no one would give him anything...." (1851.5) 169:1.7

 

FAIN = with pleasure; gladly.

 

 

***

 

...Many, many times during his years of teaching, Jesus told and retold this story of the prodigal son.... (1853.3) 169:1.16

 

But only Luke recorded it, chapter 15:

 

11 And he said, A certain man had two sons:

 

12 And the younger of them said to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods that falleth to me. And he divided unto them his living.

 

13 And not many days after the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living.

 

14 And when he had spent all, there arose a mighty famine in that land; and he began to be in want.

 

15 And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country; and he sent him into his fields to feed swine.

 

16 And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.

 

17 And when he came to himself, he said, How many hired servants of my father's have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger!

 

18 I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee,

 

19 And am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.

 

20 And he arose, and came to his father. But when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him.

 

21 And the son said unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in thy sight, and am no more worthy to be called thy son.

 

22 But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet:

 

23 And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry:

 

24 For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.

 

25 Now his elder son was in the field: and as he came and drew nigh to the house, he heard musick and dancing.

 

26 And he called one of the servants, and asked what these things meant.

 

27 And he said unto him, Thy brother is come; and thy father hath killed the fatted calf, because he hath received him safe and sound.

 

28 And he was angry, and would not go in: therefore came his father out, and intreated him.

 

29 And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment: and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends:

 

30 But as soon as this thy son was come, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.

 

31 And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine.

 

32 It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.

 

 

From Wikipedia:

 

The Prodigal Son, also known as Two Sons, Lost Son, The Running Father and The Loving Father is one of the parables of Jesus. It appears in only one of the Canonical gospels of the New Testament. According to the Gospel of Luke (Luke 15:11-32), a father gives the younger of his two sons his inheritance before he dies...It is the third and final part of a cycle on redemption, following the Parable of the Lost Sheep and the Parable of the Lost Coin.

 

431px-Pompeo_Batoni_003.jpg

The Return of the Prodigal Son (1773) by Pompeo Batoni

 

TEXT/IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

Many are the works of art inspired by this parable:

 

 

Edward_John_Poynter_The_Prodigals_Return

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

459px-Rembrandt_Harmensz_van_Rijn_-_Retu

Rembrandt, The Return of the Prodigal Son, 1662–1669 (Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg)

 

IMAGE SOURCE

 

Tomorrow's reading, Section 2. Parable of the Shrewd Stewardis one of the most striking of Jesus' parables. One that caused the materialistic Pharisees to fall deeply into disputation and arguing.

 

 

Overview of Paper 169. Last Teaching at Pella

 

1. Parable of the Lost Son

2. Parable of the Shrewd Steward

3. The Rich Man and the Beggar

4. The Father and His Kingdom

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 169 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#7 Bonita

Bonita

    Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,523 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA

Posted 31 May 2014 - 07:50 AM

 

Question about this:

 

“...A certain man had two sons...This association became so disagreeable that the younger son came to his father and said: ‘Father, give me the third portion of your possessions which would fall to me...." (1851.4) 169:1.6

 

Why do you think his portion was a third when the man had but two sons? Maybe a third went to the state or temple??

 

***

 

 

 

 

Deuteronomy 21:17.

But he shall acknowledge the son of the hated for the firstborn, by giving him a double portion of all that he hath: for he is the beginning of his strength; the right of the firstborn is his.

 

 

The eldest son gets a double portion according to Jewish law.  

 

#8 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 31 May 2014 - 08:05 AM


 



Deuteronomy 21:17.

But he shall acknowledge the son of the hated for the firstborn, by giving him a double portion of all that he hath: for he is the beginning of his strength; the right of the firstborn is his.

 

 

The eldest son gets a double portion according to Jewish law.

 

 

 

 Thank YOU.

 

 Seems like the law is specifically about the first born of the unloved wife. But double portion must surely apply to the first born of the loved wife.

 

The English version:

 

15 “If a man has two wives, the one loved and the other unloved, and both the loved and the unloved have borne him children, and if the firstborn son belongs to the unloved,

 

16 then on the day when he assigns his possessions as an inheritance to his sons, he may not treat the son of the loved as the firstborn in preference to the son of the unloved, who is the firstborn,

 

17 but he shall acknowledge the firstborn, the son of the unloved, by giving him a double portion of all that he has, for he is the firstfruits of his strength. The right of the firstborn is his.



#9 Bonita

Bonita

    Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,523 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA

Posted 31 May 2014 - 09:52 AM

The problem with the favored wife is that she generally was the unloved one.  She was picked strictly for inheritance and power purposes, not necessarily love.  Then you have the problem of Isaac and Ishmael.  Ishmael was the first born, but God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac.  There's a huge amount of significance to that because it was a major change in customs, signifying that the covenant with Abraham would be through his favored wife's son making monogamy and family a more prominent feature of the jewish religion.  

 

The story of Jewish inheritance laws began with the notion that God gave land to the Jews through a covenant with Abraham. The land of Canaan was given to him and his descendants through Isaac as an eternal possession. They were the chosen people. Therefore land and property were a gift from God and in order to maintain the covenant had to be passed to the sons as an irrevocable gift just as God had given the land to the father and his father before him.  It was a sacred duty of the first born because it was still believed that God had a claim on the first offspring of both man and beast. In regards to animals, firstlings were considered to be the best for sacrifice because of God's claim on them.  This principal is also at the root of the festival of first fruits which is the time between Passover and Pentecost when the first fruits of the harvest were given to the priests as an offering to God.  



#10 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 31 May 2014 - 10:05 AM

The problem with the favored wife is that she generally was the unloved one.  She was picked strictly for inheritance and power purposes, not necessarily love.  Then you have the problem of Isaac and Ishmael.  Ishmael was the first born, but God asked Abraham to sacrifice Isaac.  There's a huge amount of significance to that because it was a major change in customs, signifying that the covenant with Abraham would be through his favored wife's son making monogamy and family a more prominent feature of the jewish religion.  

 

The story of Jewish inheritance laws began with the notion that God gave land to the Jews through a covenant with Abraham. The land of Canaan was given to him and his descendants through Isaac as an eternal possession. They were the chosen people. Therefore land and property were a gift from God and in order to maintain the covenant had to be passed to the sons as an irrevocable gift just as God had given the land to the father and his father before him.  It was a sacred duty of the first born because it was still believed that God had a claim on the first offspring of both man and beast. In regards to animals, firstlings were considered to be the best for sacrifice because of God's claim on them.  This principal is also at the root of the festival of first fruits which is the time between Passover and Pentecost when the first fruits of the harvest were given to the priests as an offering to God.  

 

Fascinating Hebrew history lesson.



#11 Bonita

Bonita

    Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 3,523 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:USA

Posted 31 May 2014 - 10:09 AM

 

Fascinating Hebrew history lesson.

 

It's also an Islam history lesson.  Muslims believe that they are descendants of the first born.  



#12 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 01 June 2014 - 04:49 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 169 - Last Teaching at Pella

 

2. Parable of the Shrewd Steward

 

 

 

   One evening Simon Zelotes, commenting on one of Jesus’ statements, said: “Master, what did you mean when you said today that many of the children of the world are wiser in their generation than are the children of the kingdom since they are skillful in making friends with the mammon of unrighteousness?” Jesus answered:

 

(1853.5) 169:2.2 “Some of you, before you entered the kingdom, were very shrewd in dealing with your business associates. If you were unjust and often unfair, you were nonetheless prudent and farseeing in that you transacted your business with an eye single to your present profit and future safety. Likewise should you now so order your lives in the kingdom as to provide for your present joy while you also make certain of your future enjoyment of treasures laid up in heaven. If you were so diligent in making gains for yourselves when in the service of self, why should you show less diligence in gaining souls for the kingdom since you are now servants of the brotherhood of man and stewards of God?

 

(1853.6) 169:2.3 “You may all learn a lesson from the story of a certain rich man who had a shrewd but unjust steward. This steward had not only oppressed his master’s clients for his own selfish gain, but he had also directly wasted and squandered his master’s funds. When all this finally came to the ears of his master, he called the steward before him and asked the meaning of these rumors and required that he should give immediate accounting of his stewardship and prepare to turn his master’s affairs over to another.

 

(1853.7) 169:2.4 “Now this unfaithful steward began to say to himself: ‘What shall I do since I am about to lose this stewardship? I have not the strength to dig; to beg I am ashamed. I know what I will do to make certain that, when I am put out of this stewardship, I will be welcomed into the houses of all who do business with my master.’ And then, calling in each of his lord’s debtors, he said to the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’ He answered, ‘A hundred measures of oil.’ Then said the steward, ‘Take your wax board bond, sit down quickly, and change it to fifty.’ Then he said to another debtor, ‘How much do you owe?’ And he replied, ‘A hundred measures of wheat.’ Then said the steward, ‘Take your bond and write fourscore.’ And this he did with numerous other debtors. And so did this dishonest steward seek to make friends for himself after he would be discharged from his stewardship. Even his lord and master, when he subsequently found out about this, was compelled to admit that his unfaithful steward had at least shown sagacity in the manner in which he had sought to provide for future days of want and adversity.

 

(1854.1) 169:2.5 “And it is in this way that the sons of this world sometimes show more wisdom in their preparation for the future than do the children of light. I say to you who profess to be acquiring treasure in heaven: Take lessons from those who make friends with the mammon of unrighteousness, and likewise so conduct your lives that you make eternal friendship with the forces of righteousness in order that, when all things earthly fail, you shall be joyfully received into the eternal habitations.

 

(1854.2) 169:2.6 “I affirm that he who is faithful in little will also be faithful in much, while he who is unrighteous in little will also be unrighteous in much. If you have not shown foresight and integrity in the affairs of this world, how can you hope to be faithful and prudent when you are trusted with the stewardship of the true riches of the heavenly kingdom? If you are not good stewards and faithful bankers, if you have not been faithful in that which is another’s, who will be foolish enough to give you great treasure in your own name?

 

(1854.3) 169:2.7 “And again I assert that no man can serve two masters; either he will hate the one and love the other, or else he will hold to one while he despises the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.”

 

(1854.4) 169:2.8 When the Pharisees who were present heard this, they began to sneer and scoff since they were much given to the acquirement of riches. These unfriendly hearers sought to engage Jesus in unprofitable argumentation, but he refused to debate with his enemies. When the Pharisees fell to wrangling among themselves, their loud speaking attracted large numbers of the multitude encamped thereabouts; and when they began to dispute with each other, Jesus withdrew, going to his tent for the night.

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#13 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:29 AM

.

 

Good Day Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

So! Shrewdness is not to be despised. It can be employed by both the child of God, and the servant of mammon.

 

Teachings_of_Jesus_31_of_40._parable_of_

 

The Parable of the Unjust Steward (also called the Shrewd Manager) is a parable of Jesus which appears in only one of the Canonical gospels of the New Testament. According to Luke 16:1-13 a steward who is about to be fired curries favor with his master's debtors by forgiving some of their debts.

 

Text/Image Source

 

 

 

 

 

From Luke 16:

 

1 And he said also unto his disciples, There was a certain rich man, which had a steward; and the same was accused unto him that he had wasted his goods.

2 And he called him, and said unto him, How is it that I hear this of thee? give an account of thy stewardship; for thou mayest be no longer steward.

 

3 Then the steward said within himself, What shall I do? for my lord taketh away from me the stewardship: I cannot dig; to beg I am ashamed.

 

4 I am resolved what to do, that, when I am put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.

 

5 So he called every one of his lord's debtors unto him, and said unto the first, How much owest thou unto my lord?

 

6 And he said, An hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take thy bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

 

7 Then said he to another, And how much owest thou? And he said, An hundred measures of wheat. And he said unto him, Take thy bill, and write fourscore.

 

8 And the lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely: for the children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light.

 

9 And I say unto you, Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness; that, when ye fail, they may receive you into everlasting habitations.

 

10 He that is faithful in that which is least is faithful also in much: and he that is unjust in the least is unjust also in much.

 

11 If therefore ye have not been faithful in the unrighteous mammon, who will commit to your trust the true riches?

 

12 And if ye have not been faithful in that which is another man's, who shall give you that which is your own?

 

13 No servant can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon.

 

14 And the Pharisees also, who were covetous, heard all these things: and they derided him.

 

Jesus was quoted in Paper 140, teaching about trying to serve God and mammon:

 

"...You know that it has been well said: ‘No man can serve two masters.’ You cannot sincerely worship God and at the same time wholeheartedly serve mammon. Having now enlisted unreservedly in the work of the kingdom, be not anxious for your lives; much less be concerned with what you shall eat or what you shall drink; nor yet for your bodies, what clothing you shall wear. Already have you learned that willing hands and earnest hearts shall not go hungry. And now, when you prepare to devote all of your energies to the work of the kingdom, be assured that the Father will not be unmindful of your needs. Seek first the kingdom of God, and when you have found entrance thereto, all things needful shall be added to you....” (1577.7) 140:6.13

 

 

***

 

This, in today's reading, seems a significant point:

 

...These unfriendly hearers sought to engage Jesus in unprofitable argumentation, but he refused to debate with his enemies.... (1854.4) 169:2.8

 

Compare with this from Paper 149:

 

...His enemies continually laid snares for him, but they never entrapped him. The wise and learned endeavored to trip him, but he did not stumble. They sought to embroil him in debate, but his answers were always enlightening, dignified, and final. When he was interrupted in his discourses with multitudinous questions, his answers were always significant and conclusive. Never did he resort to ignoble tactics in meeting the continuous pressure of his enemies, who did not hesitate to employ every sort of false, unfair, and unrighteous mode of attack upon him.... (1674.1) 149:4.5

 

 

***

 

In tomorrow's reading, Section 3. The Rich Man and the Beggar, Simon Peter takes the stage and repeats an old Nazarite parable, about a dead man who wanted to send words of warning back to the living.

 

 

Overview of Paper 169. Last Teaching at Pella

 

1. Parable of the Lost Son

2. Parable of the Shrewd Steward

3. The Rich Man and the Beggar

4. The Father and His Kingdom

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 169 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

 

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#14 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 02 June 2014 - 05:11 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 169 - Last Teaching at Pella

 

3. The Rich Man and the Beggar

 

 

   When the meeting became too noisy, Simon Peter, standing up, took charge, saying: “Men and brethren, it is not seemly thus to dispute among yourselves. The Master has spoken, and you do well to ponder his words. And this is no new doctrine which he proclaimed to you. Have you not also heard the allegory of the Nazarites concerning the rich man and the beggar? Some of us heard John the Baptist thunder this parable of warning to those who love riches and covet dishonest wealth. And while this olden parable is not according to the gospel we preach, you would all do well to heed its lessons until such a time as you comprehend the new light of the kingdom of heaven. The story as John told it was like this:

 

(1854.6) 169:3.2 “There was a certain rich man named Dives, who, being clothed in purple and fine linen, lived in mirth and splendor every day. And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, who was laid at this rich man’s gate, covered with sores and desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man’s table; yes, even the dogs came and licked his sores. And it came to pass that the beggar died and was carried away by the angels to rest in Abraham’s bosom. And then, presently, this rich man also died and was buried with great pomp and regal splendor. When the rich man departed from this world, he waked up in Hades, and finding himself in torment, he lifted up his eyes and beheld Abraham afar off and Lazarus in his bosom. And then Dives cried aloud: ‘Father Abraham, have mercy on me and send over Lazarus that he may dip the tip of his finger in water to cool my tongue, for I am in great anguish because of my punishment.’ And then Abraham replied: ‘My son, you should remember that in your lifetime you enjoyed the good things while Lazarus in like manner suffered the evil. But now all this is changed, seeing that Lazarus is comforted while you are tormented. And besides, between us and you there is a great gulf so that we cannot go to you, neither can you come over to us.’ Then said Dives to Abraham: ‘I pray you send Lazarus back to my father’s house, inasmuch as I have five brothers, that he may so testify as to prevent my brothers from coming to this place of torment.’ But Abraham said: ‘My son, they have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.’ And then answered Dives: ‘No, No, Father Abraham! but if one go to them from the dead, they will repent.’ And then said Abraham: ‘If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded even if one were to rise from the dead.’”*

 

(1855.1) 169:3.3 After Peter had recited this ancient parable of the Nazarite brotherhood, and since the crowd had quieted down, Andrew arose and dismissed them for the night. Although both the apostles and his disciples frequently asked Jesus questions about the parable of Dives and Lazarus, he never consented to make comment thereon.

 

 

 

***

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#15 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 02 June 2014 - 05:48 AM

.

Greetings Bonita, Alina, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,

 

Wonder if Peter realized or cared that he was perpetuating an insidious belief in Hades with this old parable?

 

The writer of the Gospel of Luke (and only Luke) recorded it, in chapter 16:

 

19 There was a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day:

20 And there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, which was laid at his gate, full of sores,

21 And desiring to be fed with the crumbs which fell from the rich man's table: moreover the dogs came and licked his sores.

22 And it came to pass, that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels into Abraham's bosom: the rich man also died, and was buried;

23 And in hell he lift up his eyes, being in torments, and seeth Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.

24 And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame.

25 But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented.

26 And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence.

27 Then he said, I pray thee therefore, father, that thou wouldest send him to my father's house:

28 For I have five brethren; that he may testify unto them, lest they also come into this place of torment.

29 Abraham saith unto him, They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.

30 And he said, Nay, father Abraham: but if one went unto them from the dead, they will repent.

31 And he said unto him, If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded, though one rose from the dead.

 

About the name "Dives":

 

The Parable of the rich man and Lazarus (also called the Dives and Lazarus or Lazarus and Dives) is a well-known parable of Jesus appearing in the Gospel of Luke.

 

The Gospel of Luke (Luke 16:19–31) tells of the relationship, in life and in death, between an unnamed rich man and a poor beggar named Lazarus. The traditional name, Dives, is not actually a name, but instead a word for "rich man"...

 

Along with the parables of the Ten Virgins, Prodigal Son, and Good Samaritan, it was one of the most frequently illustrated parables in medieval art, perhaps because of its vivid account of an afterlife.

 

393px-Fedor_Bronnikov_007.jpg

llustration of Lazarus at the rich man's gate by Fyodor Bronnikov, 1886.

 

 

410px-Meister_des_Codex_Aureus_Epternace

 

Lazarus and Dives, illumination from the Codex Aureus of Echternach

Top panel: Lazarus at the rich man's door

Middle panel: Lazarus' soul is carried to Paradise by two angels; Lazarus in Abraham's bosom

Bottom panel: Dives' soul is carried off by two devils to Hell; Dives is tortured in Hades

 

TEXT/IMAGE SOURCE

 

 

 

***

 

From today's reading:

 

...both the apostles and his disciples frequently asked Jesus questions about the parable of Dives and Lazarus, he never consented to make comment thereon.... (1855.1) 169:3.3

 

Very wise! He never would have used such a parable, and he probably wished Peter hadn't uttered it, but Peter and John the Baptist thoughtlessly repeated it. What could Jesus do but make no comment?

 

 

Tomorrow's reading, the first half of Section 4. The Father and His Kingdom, is mostly a statement from the Midwayers about knowing and experiencing God, who is not well represented by the name king.

 

Overview of Paper 169. Last Teaching at Pella

 

1. Parable of the Lost Son

2. Parable of the Shrewd Steward

3. The Rich Man and the Beggar

4. The Father and His Kingdom

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 169 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.



#16 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 03 June 2014 - 05:20 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

Today's Presentation

Paper 169 - Last Teaching at Pella

4. The Father and His Kingdom

[Part 1 of 2]
 
   Jesus always had trouble trying to explain to the apostles that, while they proclaimed the establishment of the kingdom of God, the Father in heaven was not a king. At the time Jesus lived on earth and taught in the flesh, the people of Urantia knew mostly of kings and emperors in the governments of the nations, and the Jews had long contemplated the coming of the kingdom of God. For these and other reasons, the Master thought best to designate the spiritual brotherhood of man as the kingdom of heaven and the spirit head of this brotherhood as the Father in heaven. Never did Jesus refer to his Father as a king. In his intimate talks with the apostles he always referred to himself as the Son of Man and as their elder brother. He depicted all his followers as servants of mankind and messengers of the gospel of the kingdom.
 
(1855.3) 169:4.2 Jesus never gave his apostles a systematic lesson concerning the personality and attributes of the Father in heaven. He never asked men to believe in his Father; he took it for granted they did. Jesus never belittled himself by offering arguments in proof of the reality of the Father. His teaching regarding the Father all centered in the declaration that he and the Father are one; that he who has seen the Son has seen the Father; that the Father, like the Son, knows all things; that only the Son really knows the Father, and he to whom the Son will reveal him; that he who knows the Son knows also the Father; and that the Father sent him into the world to reveal their combined natures and to show forth their conjoint work. He never made other pronouncements about his Father except to the woman of Samaria at Jacob’s well, when he declared, “God is spirit.”
 
(1856.1) 169:4.3 You learn about God from Jesus by observing the divinity of his life, not by depending on his teachings. From the life of the Master you may each assimilate that concept of God which represents the measure of your capacity to perceive realities spiritual and divine, truths real and eternal. The finite can never hope to comprehend the Infinite except as the Infinite was focalized in the time-space personality of the finite experience of the human life of Jesus of Nazareth.
 
(1856.2) 169:4.4 Jesus well knew that God can be known only by the realities of experience; never can he be understood by the mere teaching of the mind. Jesus taught his apostles that, while they never could fully understand God, they could most certainly know him, even as they had known the Son of Man. You can know God, not by understanding what Jesus said, but by knowing what Jesus was. Jesus was a revelation of God.
 
(1856.3) 169:4.5 Except when quoting the Hebrew scriptures, Jesus referred to Deity by only two names: God and Father. And when the Master made reference to his Father as God, he usually employed the Hebrew word signifying the plural God (the Trinity) and not the word Yahweh, which stood for the progressive conception of the tribal God of the Jews.
 
(1856.4) 169:4.6 Jesus never called the Father a king, and he very much regretted that the Jewish hope for a restored kingdom and John’s proclamation of a coming kingdom made it necessary for him to denominate his proposed spiritual brotherhood the kingdom of heaven. With the one exception — the declaration that “God is spirit” — Jesus never referred to Deity in any manner other than in terms descriptive of his own personal relationship with the First Source and Center of Paradise.
 
 

***
 


[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]


#17 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 03 June 2014 - 06:55 AM

.

 

 

 

Good Day Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Visitors,

 

Three places in today's reading the Midwayers say Jesus did not refer to God as a king:

 

...Never did Jesus refer to his Father as a king.... (1855.2) 169:4.1

 

...Jesus never called the Father a king.... (1856.4) 169:4.6

 

...Jesus referred to Deity by only two names: God and Father.... (1856.3) 169:4.5

 

But there's this in Paper 141:

 

"...True, there is a King in this kingdom, and that King is my Father and your Father. We are indeed his loyal subjects, but far transcending that fact is the transforming truth that we are his sons. In my life this truth is to become manifest to all. Our Father also sits upon a throne, but not one made with hands. The throne of the Infinite is the eternal dwelling place of the Father in the heaven of heavens; he fills all things and proclaims his laws to universes upon universes...." (1588.4)141:2.1

 

 

The Midwayers also say this in today's reading:

 

...With the one exception — the declaration that “God is spirit” — Jesus never referred to Deity in any manner other than in terms descriptive of his own personal relationship with the First Source and Center of Paradise.... (1856.4) 169:4.6

 

But there is this from Jesus in Paper 130:

 

"...God is so positively good that there is absolutely no place in him for negative evil...." (1429.1) 130:1.5

 

And this in Paper 140:

 

“...Be merciful, even as God is merciful, and in the eternal future of the kingdom you shall be perfect, even as your heavenly Father is perfect...." (1571.3) 140:3.16

 

From Paper 148:

 

“...Job was altogether right when he challenged the doctrine that God afflicts children in order to punish their parents. Job was ever ready to admit that God is righteous, but he longed for some soul-satisfying revelation of the personal character of the Eternal. And that is our mission on earth. No more shall suffering mortals be denied the comfort of knowing the love of God and understanding the mercy of the Father in heaven. While the speech of God spoken from the whirlwind was a majestic concept for the day of its utterance, you have already learned that the Father does not thus reveal himself, but rather that he speaks within the human heart as a still, small voice, saying, ‘This is the way; walk therein.’ Do you not comprehend that God dwells within you, that he has become what you are that he may make you what he is!” (1664.2) 148:6.10

 

These apparent contradictions are indeed apparent to my mind, but new readers, and sometimes UB detractors, will ask about them, so it's good to know beforehand.

 

***

 

The fact that Jesus was God in the flesh is repeated many times. From today's reading:

 

...You can know God, not by understanding what Jesus said, but by knowing what Jesus was. Jesus was a revelation of God.... (1856.2) 169:4.4

 

From Paper 16:

 

...Jesus not only revealed God to man, but he also made a new revelation of man to himself and to other men.... (196.2) 16:9.6

 

From Paper 92:

 

...One Asiatic people taught that “God is a great fear”; that is the outgrowth of purely evolutionary religion. Jesus, the revelation of the highest type of religious living, proclaimed that “God is love....” (1004.3) 92:1.5

 

From Paper 129:

 

...the life which Jesus of Nazareth lived in the flesh and on Urantia did receive full and unqualified acceptance by the Universal Father as constituting at one and the same time, and in one and the same personality-life, the fullness of the revelation of the eternal God to mortal man and the presentation of perfected human personality to the satisfaction of the Infinite Creator.... (1425.5) 129:4.6

 

From Paper 186:

 

...Jesus not only made a revelation of God to man, but he also likewise made a new revelation of man to the Gods and to the celestial intelligences of the universe of universes.... (2002.7) 186:5.6

 

 

***

 

Some of today's reading appears in Bible text. From Matthew 11:

 

27 All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him.

 

From Luke 10:

 

22 All things are delivered to me of my Father: and no man knoweth who the Son is, but the Father; and who the Father is, but the Son, and he to whom the Son will reveal him.

 

From John 4:

 

24 God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.

 

***

 

In tomorrow's reading, the second half of Section 4. The Father and His Kingdom, the Midwayers discuss some of the Hebrew concepts of God at that time, and what Jesus taught for the ages.

 

Overview of Paper 169. Last Teaching at Pella

 

1. Parable of the Lost Son

2. Parable of the Shrewd Steward

3. The Rich Man and the Beggar

4. The Father and His Kingdom

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

Listen to Paper 169 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)

 

Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

 

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.

 



#18 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 04 June 2014 - 05:08 AM

Welcome to The OPAD Online Study Session

 

Today's Presentation

 

Paper 169 - Last Teaching at Pella

 

4. The Father and His Kingdom

 

[Part 2 of 2]

 

   Jesus employed the word God to designate the idea of Deity and the word Father to designate the experience of knowing God. When the word Father is employed to denote God, it should be understood in its largest possible meaning. The word God cannot be defined and therefore stands for the infinite concept of the Father, while the term Father, being capable of partial definition, may be employed to represent the human concept of the divine Father as he is associated with man during the course of mortal existence.

 

(1856.6) 169:4.8 To the Jews, Elohim was the God of gods, while Yahweh was the God of Israel. Jesus accepted the concept of Elohim and called this supreme group of beings God. In the place of the concept of Yahweh, the racial deity, he introduced the idea of the fatherhood of God and the world-wide brotherhood of man. He exalted the Yahweh concept of a deified racial Father to the idea of a Father of all the children of men, a divine Father of the individual believer. And he further taught that this God of universes and this Father of all men were one and the same Paradise Deity.

 

(1856.7) 169:4.9 Jesus never claimed to be the manifestation of Elohim (God) in the flesh. He never declared that he was a revelation of Elohim (God) to the worlds. He never taught that he who had seen him had seen Elohim (God). But he did proclaim himself as the revelation of the Father in the flesh, and he did say that whoso had seen him had seen the Father. As the divine Son he claimed to represent only the Father.

 

(1857.1) 169:4.10 He was, indeed, the Son of even the Elohim God; but in the likeness of mortal flesh and to the mortal sons of God, he chose to limit his life revelation to the portrayal of his Father’s character in so far as such a revelation might be comprehensible to mortal man. As regards the character of the other persons of the Paradise Trinity, we shall have to be content with the teaching that they are altogether like the Father, who has been revealed in personal portraiture in the life of his incarnated Son, Jesus of Nazareth.

 

(1857.2) 169:4.11 Although Jesus revealed the true nature of the heavenly Father in his earth life, he taught little about him. In fact, he taught only two things: that God in himself is spirit, and that, in all matters of relationship with his creatures, he is a Father. On this evening Jesus made the final pronouncement of his relationship with God when he declared: “I have come out from the Father, and I have come into the world; again, I will leave the world and go to the Father.”

 

(1857.3) 169:4.12 But mark you! never did Jesus say, “Whoso has heard me has heard God.” But he did say, “He who has seen me has seen the Father.” To hear Jesus’ teaching is not equivalent to knowing God, but to see Jesus is an experience which in itself is a revelation of the Father to the soul. The God of universes rules the far-flung creation, but it is the Father in heaven who sends forth his spirit to dwell within your minds.

 

(1857.4) 169:4.13 Jesus is the spiritual lens in human likeness which makes visible to the material creature Him who is invisible. He is your elder brother who, in the flesh, makes known to you a Being of infinite attributes whom not even the celestial hosts can presume fully to understand. But all of this must consist in the personal experience of the individual believer. God who is spirit can be known only as a spiritual experience. God can be revealed to the finite sons of the material worlds, by the divine Son of the spiritual realms, only as a Father. You can know the Eternal as a Father; you can worship him as the God of universes, the infinite Creator of all existences.

 

 

 

***

 

 

 

[Each OPAD presentation is copied from The Urantia Book published by Urantia Foundation. Questions and comments related to the Paper under discussion are welcome and encouraged. In-depth questions and related topics may be studied in branch threads in the OPAD, or other subforums, as you require. Thank you for studying with us.]



#19 Rick Warren

Rick Warren

    Rick Warren

  • Administrators
  • PipPip
  • 9,923 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texas

Posted 04 June 2014 - 06:19 AM

 


Greetings Bonita, Alina, Carolyn, Carola, Fellow Students, Forum Friends, Members and Guests,
 
This is a fascinating statement, isn't it?:
 
...The word God cannot be defined.... (1856.5) 169:4.7
 
Humans have certainly tried:
 
1. the one Supreme Being, the creator and ruler of the universe.
2. the Supreme Being considered with reference to a particular attribute: the God of Islam.
3. (lowercase) one of several deities, especially a male deity, presiding over some portion of worldly affairs.
4. (often lowercase) a supreme being according to some particular conception: the god of mercy.
5. Christian Science. the Supreme Being, understood as Life, Truth, love, Mind, Soul, Spirit, Principle.
 
 
Catholics define God as Truth, Beauty and Goodness. In several Papers there is this similar statement about comprehending God and Deity:

 

...Divinity is creature comprehensible as truth, beauty, and goodness; correlated in personality as love, mercy, and ministry; disclosed on impersonal levels as justice, power, and sovereignty.... (3.4) 0:1.17

 

...Throughout this glorious age the chief pursuit of the ever-advancing mortals is the quest for a better understanding and a fuller realization of the comprehensible elements of Deity--truth, beauty, and goodness. This represents man's effort to discern God in mind, matter, and spirit. And as the mortal pursues this quest, he finds himself increasingly absorbed in the experiential study of philosophy, cosmology, and divinity.... (646:3) 56:10.2

 

...The worlds settled in light and life are so fully concerned with the comprehension of truth, beauty, and goodness because these quality values embrace the revelation of Deity to the realms of time and space.... (646:10) 56:10.9

 

...To finite man truth, beauty, and goodness embrace the full revelation of divinity reality. As this love-comprehension of Deity finds spiritual expression in the lives of God-knowing mortals, there are yielded the fruits of divinity: intellectual peace, social progress, moral satisfaction, spiritual joy, and cosmic wisdom. The advanced mortals on a world in the seventh stage of light and life have learned that love is the greatest thing in the universe — and they know that God is love.... (648.3) 56:10.20

 

...To material, evolutionary, finite creatures, a life predicated on the living of the Father's will leads directly to the attainment of spirit supremacy in the personality arena and brings such creatures one step nearer the comprehension of the Father-Infinite. Such a Father life is one predicated on truth, sensitive to beauty, and dominated by goodness.... (1175:1) 106:9.12

 

...The worlds settled in light and life are so fully concerned with the comprehension of truth, beauty, and goodness because these quality values embrace the revelation of Deity to the realms of time and space.... (646:10) 56:10.9

 

 
 
 
In the Foreword and first five Papers a Divine Counselor attempts to describe the comprehensible aspects of our Universal Father. From the Foreword:
 
...GOD is a word symbol designating all personalizations of Deity. The term requires a different definition on each personal level of Deity function and must be still further redefined within each of these levels, as this term may be used to designate the diverse co-ordinate and subordinate personalizations of Deity; for example: the Paradise Creator Sons — the local universe fathers.... (3.19) 0:2.6
 
From Paper 1:
 
...God is primal reality in the spirit world; God is the source of truth in the mind spheres; God overshadows all throughout the material realms. To all created intelligences God is a personality, and to the universe of universes he is the First Source and Center of eternal reality. God is neither manlike nor machinelike. The First Father is universal spirit, eternal truth, infinite reality, and father personality.... (23.4) 1:2.1
 
 
Some background on the word Elohim, cited in today's reading:
 
...Jesus never claimed to be the manifestation of Elohim (God) in the flesh.... (1856.7) 169:4.9
 
There is this from a Melchizedek in Paper 96:
 
...Elohim. In Kish and Ur there long persisted Sumerian-Chaldean groups who taught a three-in-one God concept founded on the traditions of the days of Adam and Melchizedek. This doctrine was carried to Egypt, where this Trinity was worshiped under the name of Elohim, or in the singular as Eloah. The philosophic circles of Egypt and later Alexandrian teachers of Hebraic extraction taught this unity of pluralistic Gods, and many of Moses’ advisers at the time of the exodus believed in this Trinity. But the concept of the trinitarian Elohim never became a real part of Hebrew theology until after they had come under the political influence of the Babylonians.... (1053.6) 96:1.8
 
And this in Paper 142:
 
...Elohim. From the times of Adam the teaching of the Paradise Trinity has persisted. Do you not recall how the Scriptures begin by asserting that “In the beginning the Gods created the heavens and the earth”? This indicates that when that record was made the Trinity concept of three Gods in one had found lodgment in the religion of our forebears.... (1598.7) 142:3.6
 
 
The Midwayers bring in the other two Gods comprising the Trinity. From today's text:
 
...As regards the character of the other persons of the Paradise Trinity, we shall have to be content with the teaching that they are altogether like the Father.... (1857.1) 169:4.10
 
The Divine Counselor wrote five Papers on God the Father, and four more on his divine associates: God the Son and God the Spirit:
 
 
 
***
 
This line from Jesus in today's reading:
 
“...I have come out from the Father, and I have come into the world; again, I will leave the world and go to the Father....” (1857.2) 169:4.11

...was recorded in the Gospel of John, chapter 16:
 
28 I came forth from the Father, and am come into the world: again, I leave the world, and go to the Father.
 
And John Zebedee also remembered this line:
 
...he did say, “He who has seen me has seen the Father....” (1857.3) 169:4.12
 
...in two places, chapter 14:
 
7 If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him.
8 Philip saith unto him, Lord, show us the Father, and it sufficeth us.
9 Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Show us the Father?
 
...and John 12:
 
44 Jesus cried and said, He that believeth on me, believeth not on me, but on him that sent me.
45 And he that seeth me seeth him that sent me.
 
 
The last paragraph of today's reading, also the last of Paper 169, is so beautifully expressive and confirming of the goodness and transcendence of God, yet He is so attainable through the living way revealed by the Master, the way of genuine religious experience:
 
...But all of this must consist in the personal experience of the individual believer.... (1857.4) 169:4.13
 
 
Seen the Father, Seen the Son.gif


 
***
 
Overview of Paper 169. Last Teaching at Pella

 

 

This group of papers [121-196] was sponsored by a commission of twelve Urantia midwayers acting under the supervision of a Melchizedek revelatory director. The basis of this narrative was supplied by a secondary midwayer who was onetime assigned to the superhuman watchcare of the Apostle Andrew.

 

 

Listen to Paper 169 (click the speaker icon at the top of the page)


Tomorrow's reading is the introduction to Paper 170: The Kingdom Of Heaven, in which the Midwayers tell us about Jesus' last teaching at Pella. Since there is so much confusion in the minds of his followers, he is compelled to clarify the difference between earthly kingdoms and the celestial domain, at length.

 
Thanks for reading. Members' thoughts, reflections, insights, observations, comments, corrections and questions about today's OPAD presentation are invited.

Much love, Rick/OPAD host.




Reply to this topic



  


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users