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Are UB "Dark Islands" Astronomy's Black Holes?


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#1 Rick Warren

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 10:04 AM

Dear Forumites,

This recent article in ScienceDaily appears to coincide with a statement made in Paper 15.

Giant Black Hole Could Upset Galaxy Evolution Models

Nov. 27, 2012 — A group of astronomers led by Remco van den Bosch from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA) have discovered a black hole that could shake the foundations of current models of galaxy evolution. At 17 billion times the mass of the Sun, its mass is much greater than current models predict -- in particular since the surrounding galaxy is comparatively small. This could be the most massive black hole found to date.

To the best of our astronomical knowledge, almost every galaxy should contain in its central region what is called a supermassive black hole: a black hole with a mass between that of hundreds of thousands and billions of Suns. The best-studied super-massive black hole sits in the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way, with a mass of about four million Suns.


For the masses of galaxies and their central black holes, an intriguing trend has emerged: a direct relationship between the mass of a galaxy's black hole and that of the galaxy's stars.
Typically, the black hole mass is a tiny fraction of the galaxy's total mass. But now a search led by Remco van den Bosch (MPIA) has discovered a massive black hole that could upset the accepted relationship between black hole mass and galaxy mass, which plays a key role in all current theories of galaxy evolution. The observations used the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and existing images from the Hubble Space Telescope.

With a mass 17 billion times that of the Sun, the newly discovered black hole in the center of the disk galaxy NGC 1277 might even be the biggest known black hole of all: the mass of the current record holder is estimated to lie between 6 and 37 billion solar masses (McConnell et al. 2011); if the true value lies towards the lower end of that range, NGC 1277 breaks the record. At the least, NGC 1277 harbors the second-biggest known black hole.

The big surprise is that the black hole mass for NGC 1277 amounts to 14% of the total galaxy mass, instead of usual values around 0,1%. This beats the old record by more than a factor 10. Astronomers would have expected a black hole of this size inside blob-like ("elliptical") galaxies ten times larger. Instead, this black hole sits inside a fairly small disk galaxy.

Is this surprisingly massive black hole a freak accident? Preliminary analysis of additional data suggests otherwise -- so far, the search has uncovered five additional galaxies that are comparatively small, yet, going by first estimates, seemed to harbor unusually large black holes too. More definite conclusions have to await detailed images of these galaxies.

If the additional candidates are confirmed, and there are indeed more black holes like this, astronomers will need to rethink fundamentally their models of galaxy evolution. In particular, they will need to look at the early universe: The galaxy hosting the new black hole appears to have formed more than 8 billion years ago, and does not appear to have changed much since then. Whatever created this giant black hole must have happened a long time ago.

Source: http://www.scienceda...21128132116.htm



Compare with this from a Universal Censor in Paper 15:6:

...The Dark Islands of Space. These are the dead suns and other large aggregations of matter devoid of light and heat. The dark islands are sometimes enormous in mass and exert a powerful influence in universe equilibrium and energy manipulation. The density of some of these large masses is well-nigh unbelievable. And this great concentration of mass enables these dark islands to function as powerful balance wheels, holding large neighboring systems in effective leash. They hold the gravity balance of power in many constellations; many physical systems which would otherwise speedily dive to destruction in near-by suns are held securely in the gravity grasp of these guardian dark islands. It is because of this function that we can locate them accurately. We have measured the gravity pull of the luminous bodies, and we can therefore calculate the exact size and location of the dark islands of space which so effectively function to hold a given system steady in its course.... P.173 - 1 (15:6)



Comments invited, especially from astronomyphiles.


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#2 -Scott-

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 01:34 PM

I think you are absolutely right on this one Rick.
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#3 Nigel Nunn

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:48 AM

Thanks Rick. This black hole -- dark island connection is one of many unexplored features of UB physics.

First some background: native science currently proposes three types of "black hole": little ones, weighing 1 - 20 times the mass of our sun, big ones, weighing millions or billions of times as much, and microscopic ones, that may weigh nothing at all.

The little ones are born when a big star dies. The big ones were proposed to explain what we see at the center of galaxies, and the "microscopic" ones... well, I'll get back to these.

Let's consider the first type first, since both physics and the UB start off with a similar story. When a big star has spent its fuel and starts to collapse, if what remains weighs more than about 3 solar masses, then no internal forces or structure can stop it collapsing below its "event horizon" -- an horizon beyond which events can't be seen.

Old-time physics did not have theories to explain how this collapse could be stopped, so researchers had to allow for the idea of total collapse to a point -- a star's worth of mass-energy squeezed into zero volume. Einstein, among others, rejected this idea, claiming that nature would have a way to avoid such abuse of spacetime. Nevertheless, all agreed that the object would collapse into some volume locked away behind an event horizon. Such compact objects were labelled black holes because any light that crosses their event horizon gets "trapped". The object neither reflects nor emits light, hence, "black hole".

Einstein's (faintly glimpsed) ideas of general relativity explain this trapping of light by proposing that space is warped by mass-energy. The straight path followed by soon-to-be-trapped photons becomes a geodesic falling into a funnel of spacetime. But page (125.6, 11:8.3) states that (absolutely ultimate) space is not warped by mass-energy; implying that what's warped may be merely the medium (UnQ?) in which light waves. (125.6, 11:8.3) "Space is nonresponsive to gravity"

Regarding these "stellar mass" black holes, on page (458.6, 41:3.6) the UB states something else that, if true, could launch physics out of its current pit-stop. Here's the thing: if a neutron star starts to collapse, last century's standard model has no way to stop the collapse. So physics students are taught that this collapse continues all the way to a point, or singularity. The problem here is that as the volume gets smaller, the density (mass-energy divided by volume) gets bigger. By believing that a star collapses to a point, these students are asked to believe in division by zero (and the associated infinities).

Here's where the UB can help. By making matter (leptons and quarks) from ultimatons, there's plenty of space inside a neutron star for it to compact itself into a quark (or "preon") star. This idea is essentially compatible with modern physics. But the UB takes a different tack when it states, bluntly, that once such a compacting mass approaches a certain well-defined radius, it explodes. (458.6, 41:3.6) "limiting and critical explosion point..."

This explosion is not expected by naive native science, since it's thought to require "too much energy". But "too much energy" is precisely what ultimatons have. Only by huddling can they mutually mask each other's potential (and be made to perform as leptons and quarks). But make them bump elbows, well, this exposes their absonite attributes, and the entire ball unzips. Only Force Organizers may truly understand what happen next -- all we see is a curious squirt of gamma rays.

Next, black holes of the "supermassive" and "massless" kind.

Nigel

#4 Rick Warren

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:46 AM

Next, black holes of the "supermassive" and "massless" kind.

Nigel


Good! So long as you come around to the topic's central question eventually :D (How I wish physicists came with sub-titles)

#5 Nigel Nunn

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 09:03 AM

So long as you come around to the topic's central question eventually


Oops, sorry about that -- I should have been more clear: anything that collapses below its event horizon will appear to current researchers as a "black hole". The UB is adjusting this more-or-less erroneous concept by stating that stellar mass "black holes" are in fact islands of collapsed matter, not holes, and that these dark islands must explode if they collapse below a certain radius (smaller than the Schwarzschild radius that defines the event horizon that makes them dark/black).

[Added]
PS: I should also add that once these 'dark islands' shrink below their horizon, they can continue to cool off, and to grow in mass, exactly like current physics models accretion discs feeding matter into what are called "low mass x-ray binaries" (LMXB); the UB's 'dark island' performs exactly like a 'black hole'... until the (compacting) mass increases to a point where the density forces ultimatons to their "limiting and critical explosion point". See ultimatonic condensation.
[Done]

The article you refer to above is about "supermassive black holes" which are something completely different. For these, we need to add Force Organizers to the discussion.

PS: be careful what you wish for :D

Nigel

Edited by Nigel Nunn, 04 January 2013 - 09:32 AM.
Added more about dark islands matching black holes


#6 Rick Warren

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 09:38 AM

Oops, sorry about that -- I should have been more clear: anything that collapses below its event horizon will appear to current researchers as a "black hole". The UB is adjusting this more-or-less erroneous concept by stating that stellar mass "black holes" are in fact islands of collapsed matter, not holes, and that these dark islands must explode if they collapse below a certain radius (smaller than the Schwarzschild radius that defines the event horizon that makes them dark/black).

The article you refer to above is about "supermassive black holes" which are something completely different. For these, we need to add Force Organizers to the discussion.

PS: be careful what you wish for :D

Nigel



Oh, OK, point taken. Wish withdrawn! :lol:

Lead us fearlessly on into the realms of Force Organizers and supermassives. The Organizers were revealed in Paper 29:5. there are two types:


...1. Primary Eventuated Master Force Organizers.
2. Associate Transcendental Master Force Organizers.

These two mighty orders of primordial-force manipulators work exclusively under the supervision of the Architects of the Master Universe, and at the present time they do not function extensively within the boundaries of the grand universe.

Primary Master Force Organizers are the manipulators of the primordial or basic space-forces of the Unqualified Absolute; they are nebulae creators. They are the living instigators of the energy cyclones of space and the early organizers and directionizers of these gigantic manifestations. These force organizers transmute primordial force (pre-energy not responsive to direct Paradise gravity) into primary or puissant energy, energy transmuting from the exclusive grasp of the Unqualified Absolute to the gravity grasp of the Isle of Paradise. They are thereupon succeeded by the associate force organizers, who continue the process of energy transmutation from the primary through the secondary or gravity-energy stage.... P.329 - 4



#7 Louis aka loucol

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 08:21 PM

Is it not curious the these squirts of gamma rays take on the shape of an hour glass? These look remarkably similar to what the UB described as Unpervaded Space. :huh:
An escape valve perhaps? Could we be seeing the pattern topology of the Master Universe in galaxies, suns, and planets?

Edited by LouisM, 03 January 2013 - 08:24 PM.

His Will Be Done

#8 Nigel Nunn

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 10:14 AM

Hi Rick and LouisM,

The squirts I was referring to are the short gamma ray bursts. Astronomers get excited about fresh ideas to explain these things. Last year a group at NASA thought they'd solved the puzzle by adjusting their models for merging neutron stars. This (and other such extreme events) should certainly cause fireworks; but if we show that dark islands can explode, well, there's one Nobel for someone short of funding.

The other type of gamma ray burst (longer than about 2 seconds) seems to come with the birth of these dark islands/black holes -- so the UB is revealing that two of the most spectacular releases of material energy we can observe are associated with the birth and death of dark islands. (PS: what a splendid demonstration of recycling -- a big star lives and dies, and in dying triggers the birth of new stars. No wonder the universe of universes remains young, and full of surprises!)

Is it not curious the these squirts of gamma rays take on the shape of an hour glass?


Louis, regarding those hour-glass shaped structures, you may be thinking of the lobes associated with outflows from "black holes of the supermassive kind". More on those soon.

PS: Rick, I added a few lines to this post, to make clearer the dark island - black hole connection.

Nigel

#9 Rick Warren

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 10:49 AM

...but if we show that dark islands can explode, well, there's one Nobel for someone short of funding.


PS: Rick, I added a few lines to this post, to make clearer the dark island - black hole connection.

Nigel


Thanks Nigel,

The addition is helpful. So! An explosive threshold!! Ultimatons can take only so much before they blow up. I know the feeling...

Shouldn't we alert the Nobel Committee? And do you plan to share the prize with the Force Organizers?




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