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Zoroastrianism


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#21 Coop

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 08:55 PM

'' I got to thinking about the Amesha Spenta and wondered if it was at the root of the belief in chakras. They're similar.''

Wow ! Yes More than Very Similar
A Nice Connection you made Too !
The Spirit of Truth and Your TA Must Be Workin Overtime !
Thanks !

As I Didnt See or Make that Connection Before .

Yet I Just Found This ...
Amesha Spentas & Chakras
http://www.zarathush...cle/chakras.htm

NAMASTE

Edited by Coop, 13 December 2012 - 09:07 PM.


#22 Bonita

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 08:20 PM

Thanks for that link Coop. I figured that these philosophies all came from the same source and developed according to the culture where they eventually took root. Interesting stuff. It's amazing how the the Seven Master Spirits got whittled down to such finite levels, but that's what humans do, or did. Now with TUB, at least we can get the train back on the tracks.

Another cultural element of Zoroastrianism is the belief in the Yazatas, divine sparks with protective powers, comparable to the angels. The Chief of the Yazatas on Earth is Zarathustra. There are also the Fravashis, or genii, with military-like responsibility to guard against evil who assist the Yazatas.

And just as Ahura Mazda is surrounded by the Amesha Spenta, the Yazatas and Fravashis, so is Angro Mainyu surrounded by a group of six arch-demons and minor daevas of darkness. Each member of the Amesha Spenta has a special foe.

Ahura Mazda••Angro Mainyu (Father of evil)
Vohu-Manu••Aka Manah (Evil mind)
Asha-Vahista••Indra (Demon opposing truth)
Khshathra-vairya••Saru (the Tyrant)
Spenta Armaiti••Naoghatya (Arrogance)
Haurvatat••Taru (Evil hunger)
Ameretat••Zarika (Evil thirst)

Obviously, this is where any similarity to the Seven Master Spirits greatly deviates. Zoroastrianism attempted to solve the problem of evil with dueling heavenly forces. And whenever one sets up this type of dualism, one must also develop an end-game. Someone must win the battle, but it is a battle that fortunately does not actually exist. How is it that this belief system permeated the world for so very, very long and with such intensely gripping ferocity?

#23 Bonita

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Posted 15 December 2012 - 09:49 AM

I don't know if any others detect a direct correlation between the above aspects of Zoroastrianism and Gnosticism, but they are very closely aligned. Notably, the idea of divine sparks is part of the elaborate cosmology of Manichaeism, a third century Mesopotamian gnostic religion that nearly usurped Christianity. In fact, St. Augustine began his religious life as a Manichaean finally converting to Christianity in 387.

#24 Bonita

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 02:16 PM

It's now time to examine how the hosts of heaven and hell in Zoroastrianism are related in Judaism. Recall that until the Babylonian exile, the Hebrews did not specifically deal with the origin of evil, nor did they entertain the concept of agents of evil, let alone a specific place where they dwell. On the other hand, there is much written about Hebrew angels who were messengers for Yahweh, messengers of divine authority. For the most part, angels were part of folklore rather than accepted, organized and prophetic religion. After the exile the angels appear in the prophetic writings of Ezekiel, Zechariah, Daniel and Enoch and in the latter writings there is developed a definite hierarchy, similar to what is found in Zoroastrianism.

At this time angels were referred to as the Holy Ones, not unlike the Amesha Spenta, and similarly, there were seven in number: Michael, Raphael, Gabriel, Uriel, Raguel, Zerachiel and Remiel. These are the same angels found in Kabbalism; also, these angels were called Watchers, a term found in Gnostic texts.

As Ahura Mazda was recognized as one of the Amesha Spenta, and together they were called the seven Imoortal or Holy Ones, it seems probable that the developed Jewish conception which came into prominence at this time had a Persian source. This is implied further in the number seven often occurring in sacred symbolisms. It is after Persian influence that we find names given to the archangels, Gabriel, Michael, Uhiel, Raphael. The Book of Enoch names the whole seven archangels. Long lists of names of angels occur in Enoch, and in other later literature. (George William Carter, Zoroastrianism and Judaism, The Gorham Press, Boston, 1918, pg 65.)



#25 Bonita

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 12:24 PM

121:1.1 Jesus did not come to this world during an age of spiritual decadence; at the time of his birth Urantia was experiencing such a revival of spiritual thinking and religious living as it had not known in all its previous post-Adamic history nor has experienced in any era since. When Michael incarnated on Urantia, the world presented the most favorable condition for the Creator Son's bestowal that had ever previously prevailed or has since obtained. In the centuries just prior to these times Greek culture and the Greek language had spread over Occident and near Orient, and the Jews, being a Levantine race, in nature part Occidental and part Oriental, were eminently fitted to utilize such cultural and linguistic settings for the effective spread of a new religion to both East and West.

The fact that Judaism adopted some aspects of Zoroastrianism seems to have been to its ultimate benefit. Perhaps the need to deal with the problem of evil as well as adopting a hierarchy of celestial beings living between man and God was part of the overall evolution of religious thought necessary to bring us to where we are today.

121:6.1 By the close of the first century before Christ the religious thought of Jerusalem had been tremendously influenced and somewhat modified by Greek cultural teachings and even by Greek philosophy. In the long contest between the views of the Eastern and Western schools of Hebrew thought, Jerusalem and the rest of the Occident and the Levant in general adopted the Western Jewish or modified Hellenistic viewpoint.

Philo, who lived at the time of Jesus, had much to do with the further blending of ideas from the Jewish scriptures, already influenced by the Persians, with Greek philosophy. It was Philo who conceived the idea that not only angels and other celestial beings acted as agents between God and the world, but also power and logic as well. He called this the Logos, the interpreter of God to men. Later, we see in the Christian Gospels that Jesus is identified as the Logos.




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