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#1 Bonita

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 02:57 PM

95:6.7 The teachings of Zoroaster thus came successively to impress three great religions: Judaism and Christianity and, through them, Mohammedanism.

One of my pastimes is studying the history of religion. Zoroastrianism is one of those religions that always fascinated me and when I read the above quote my interest in the teachings of Zoroaster piqued. Just recently I discovered a reprint of a book from 1918 by George William Carter titled, Zoroastrianism and Judaism, published originally by Gorham Press. It is a fascinating book that outlines how the Persian religion of Zoroaster influenced Judaism, and since TUB describes this phenomenon as a successive influence, first on Judaism, I thought I would share my study with you. I guess this is more like an essay, but dialogue is certainly welcome.

Beginning with Zoroaster himself: Zoroaster is also known as Zarathustra, his name in Avestan, an ancient Indo-Iranian language, which means old camel. Dr. Carter places his birth in the late seventh century or the earlier half of the sixth century BC in western Iran. TUB tells us that he was born in the sixth century BC.

92:5.12 4. The sixth century before Christ. Many men arose to proclaim truth in this, one of the greatest centuries of religious awakening ever witnessed on Urantia. Among these should be recorded Gautama, Confucius, Lao-tse, Zoroaster, and the Jainist teachers.

Next post, I'll quote Dr. Carter's story of the mythical beginnings and enlightenment of Zarathustra (Zoroaster) along with some quotes from TUB.

Edited by Bonita, 09 November 2012 - 07:30 AM.


#2 -Scott-

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 04:14 PM

I don't know if you have ever thought of this Bonita but I have always found the Faravahar a curious symbol. If someone were to look up at ancient people riding Fandors they would probably think they are gods. They would also probably see the outline of a bird and a man riding a bird and perhaps a saddle and some type of stirrup for footing. Of coarse the historical intereptation of this symbol is debated.



Historical Meanings

The exact meaning of the Zoroastrian Faravahar in history is debatable. Some have argued that it originally represented Ahura Mazda. However, Zoroastrians generally consider Ahura Mazda to be transcendent, spiritual and without physical form, and for most of their history they did not artistically depict him at all. More likely, it continued to primarily represent divine glory.
It may have also been associated with the fravashi (also known as the frawahr), which is part of the human soul and acts as a protector. It is a divine blessing granted by Ahura Mazda at birth and is entirely good. This is different from the rest of the soul, which will be judged according to its deeds on the day of judgment.


Posted Image If someone looked up from the ground they would probably see a guy riding a bird with outstretched wings like this. Perhaps those other objects are a type of saddle and leg holdings....Just speculating...

Edited by Warren Scott, 08 November 2012 - 04:16 PM.

If one man craves freedom -- liberty -- he must remember that all other men long for the same freedom

#3 Bonita

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 05:13 PM

I've found this website to be very informative: http://www.crystalin.../faravahar.html

#4 Bonita

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 10:03 AM

Although TUB tells us nothing about Zoroaster's birth and early life, it does tell us when he lived and states that he was in direct contact with the descendants of the early Melchizedek missionaries.

131:5.1 Zoroaster was himself directly in contact with the descendants of the earlier Melchizedek missionaries, and their doctrine of the one God became a central teaching in the religion which he founded in Persia.

We are also told about the conversion of an Iranian prince who helped spread Zoroaster's religion as well as how Zoroaster died.

95:6.4 Finally, upon the conversion of an Iranian prince, this new religion was spread by the sword. And Zoroaster heroically died in battle for that which he believed was the “truth of the Lord of light.”

Below is a quote from book I'm reading which describes the facts and myths that developed around Zoroaster and his life.

He is the son of Powmshaspa and Dughedha. His lineage and ancestry are traced in detail. His life is a series of marvels. Omens and prodigies attend his birth. Sorcerers and enchanters endeavor to destroy the young child, but all their efforts are fruitless. Necromancy, sorcery and the black art are constantly resorted to, all of which Zarathustra defies. He even rebukes his father for yielding to such influence.
At about twenty, he withdraws and gives himself to thought and meditation. This is the period of preparation common to all great teachers. At the age of thirty when he is by the river Avetak the revelation comes. It is parallel to the vision of Daniel. The archangel Vohumanah (good thought), the Gabriel of the faith, appears and leads Zarathustra to a conference with Ahura Mazda, which is the first of seven visions with hallowed communings, which he enjoys during the next ten years. After the first vision, he preaches reform to the heretical priesthood and people of the land, but with no success.
In disappointment he wanders for years, and his first convert was not won till after ten years. He was his own cousin, Maidhyo-Mah. At the bidding of Ahura Mazda, Zarathustra now goes to the court of Vishtaspa. Here after discouragements for two years, by a miracle finally being performed on the king's favorite horse, the king is won for the faith. Vishtaspa becomes a great helper in propagating the religion through Iran and beyond. . . .
The religion spread rapidly after the conversion of Vishtaspa. The holy wars against the Hyaoman leader Arejat-Aspa, who twice invaded Iran formed the great events of the last ten years of Zarathustra's life. The victory for the faith was complete and the religion became finally established. It was during the second invasion that Zarathustra probably perished, at the age of seventy-seven, (perhaps in B.C. 563). Phalavi texts always speak of a murderer.

George William Carter, Zoroastrianism and Judaism, 1918, The Gorham Press, Boston, pgs.25-27


Edited by Bonita, 09 November 2012 - 10:04 AM.


#5 Rick Warren

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 01:37 PM

Sounds like Vishtaspa, or perhaps his son, is the one Melchizedek was talking about. Good find.

#6 Bonita

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:24 AM

95:6.1 From Palestine some of the Melchizedek missionaries passed on through Mesopotamia and to the great Iranian plateau. For more than five hundred years the Salem teachers made headway in Iran, and the whole nation was swinging to the Melchizedek religion when a change of rulers precipitated a bitter persecution which practically ended the monotheistic teachings of the Salem cult. The doctrine of the Abrahamic covenant was virtually extinct in Persia when, in that great century of moral renaissance, the sixth before Christ, Zoroaster appeared to revive the smouldering embers of the Salem gospel.

And it was that revival of the Salem gospel which Jesus pointed out to Ganid when he was compiling his excerpts. We are told that besides Judaism, Zoroastrianism contained more of the Salem gospel than any other religion.

131:5.1 Aside from Judaism religion of that day contained more of these Salem teachings. From the records of this religion Ganid made the following excerpts: . . .

But rather than reprint the section on Zoroastrianism, I decided to paraphrase and itemize the salient points into a list of Zoroaster's original teachings which might make it easier to compare and contrast them with their adulterated form and with Judaism. The following list is summarized from Paper 131 section 5:
  • There is one God and all there is belongs to one God, the Creator.
  • God is good and all-wise.
  • God observes all things, both good and evil.
  • God is an all-powerful benefactor.
  • Salvation is offered to both the good and the wicked.
  • God determines the rewards for both good and evil.
  • God offers immortality to the righteous.
  • "As you supremely desire, so shall you be."
  • God is both the farthest and the nearest, he dwells within the soul and is a friend.
  • Through good thinking God enables man to do his will.
  • Man can become perfect like God and unite with him.
  • Righteousness leads to union with God.
  • There is life after death.
  • Forgiveness removes the bonds of sin.
  • God is merciful.
Unfortunately, those beautiful teachings of Zoroaster did not sustain the perversions of primitive and superstitious evolutionary religion.

95:6.8 But it is a far cry from the exalted teachings and noble psalms of Zoroaster to the modern perversions of his gospel by the Parsees with their great fear of the dead, coupled with the entertainment of beliefs in sophistries which Zoroaster never stooped to countenance.

Dr. Carter describes corrupted Zoroastrianism and, as I did with Ganid's excerpts, I will paraphrase and itemize from chapter II of his book referenced earlier, Zorastrianism and Judaism.
  • There is one God, Ahura Mazda and although he is supreme, his unity is incomplete.
  • God is wise and omniscient.
  • God is personal but his personal relationship with man is primarily confined to Zarathustra.
  • God is a friend and is interested in man's welfare.
  • There is constant warfare between goodness and evil; intelligence and ignorance.
  • The good and intelligent spirit is Ahura Mazda, the evil and ignorant spirit is Angro Mainyu.
  • This conflict is limited with goodness eventually triumphing and evil being annihilated.
  • There will be an end time with general resurrection of the dead.
  • A doctrine of eschatology, judgment day.
  • An elaborate system of angels and demons.
  • Nature worship with deification of the celestial bodies, fire, earth and water.
  • Excessive rituals and concern over purity, especially ceremonial cleanliness of the body, animals and agriculture.
  • High code of ethics.


#7 Coop

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 10:42 AM

Fascinating

and the list You summarized Is very Interesting

Thanks an please Do Continue .

http://en.wikipedia..../Zoroastrianism

Edited by Coop, 12 November 2012 - 10:47 AM.


#8 Coop

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 11:18 AM


Edited by Coop, 12 November 2012 - 11:19 AM.


#9 Bonita

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 11:55 AM

Here is a list of things that Dr. Carter says that Zoroastrianism (as practiced) and Judaism have in common (from page 38 of Zoroastrianism and Judaism):
  • Both were initiated by a prophet.
  • Both worship one God.
  • Both believe in an evil power.
  • Both forbid the making of images.
  • Both stress moral acts.
  • Both are intolerant toward other systems of belief.
  • Both developed priestly cults.
  • Both emphasize ceremonial purity and cleanness.
  • Both had similar synagogue-like worship.
  • Both believe in angels and demons.
  • Both believe in life after death.
With so much in common, it's a wonder that they remained two separate religions. But it makes it less curious as to why King Cyrus released the Hebrews from their Babylonian captivity in order to rebuild the Jerusalem Temple. Apparently the Babylonians/Persians were not so ill disposed toward a sister religion which they were able to so heavily influence. The Hebrews, however, always held to their special covenant, erecting a wall of separation which prevented a complete amalgamation. But despite their exclusivity, the Hebrew's attraction to the Persian version of Zoroastrianism heavily influenced their just recently written scriptures which they took back to Jerusalem to be inculcated. And then, after the passage of half a millennium, these same beliefs heavily influenced Christianity, followed later by Islam.

96:0.3 The Salem religion persisted among the Kenites in Palestine as their creed, and this religion as it was later adopted by the Hebrews was influenced, first, by Egyptian moral teachings; later, by Babylonian theologic thought; and lastly, by Iranian conceptions of good and evil. Factually the Hebrew religion is predicated upon the covenant between Abraham and Machiventa Melchizedek, evolutionally it is the outgrowth of many unique situational circumstances, but culturally it has borrowed freely from the religion, morality, and philosophy of the entire Levant. It is through the Hebrew religion that much of the morality and religious thought of Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Iran was transmitted to the Occidental peoples.

#10 Coop

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 12:46 PM

Sister Bonita I Hope you dont mind these Videos
As I Find them to be a good overview
An Hope Others Do Also .



#11 Bonita

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 12:58 PM

Sister Bonita I Hope you dont mind these Videos
As I Find them to be a good overview
An Hope Others Do Also .


No, I don't mind at all. The more information the better. The better we understand other religions, the less strange they seem, and the more likely prejudices might become softened.

#12 Bonita

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:33 AM

The next thing I'd like to do is compare the evolutionary gods, Ahura Mazda and Yahweh and how they influenced one another.

95:7.2 Each tribe worshiped its olden fetish, and many individual families had their own household gods. Long the struggle continued between Babylonian Ishtar, Hebrew Yahweh, Iranian Ahura, and Christian Father of the Lord Jesus Christ. Never was one concept able fully to displace the others.

Beginning with Yahweh, TUB has given us much information. Yahweh began as a nature god identified with the Sinai volcano on Mount Horeb. He was represented by golden and silver calves.

96:1.3 1. Yahweh was the god of the southern Palestinian tribes, who associated this concept of deity with Mount Horeb, the Sinai volcano. Yahweh was merely one of the hundreds and thousands of nature gods which held the attention and claimed the worship of the Semitic tribes and peoples.

96:1.11 Up to about 2000 B.C., Mount Sinai was intermittently active as a volcano, occasional eruptions occurring as late as the time of the sojourn of the Israelites in this region. The fire and smoke, together with the thunderous detonations associated with the eruptions of this volcanic mountain, all impressed and awed the Bedouins of the surrounding regions and caused them greatly to fear Yahweh. This spirit of Mount Horeb later became the god of the Hebrew Semites, and they eventually believed him to be supreme over all other gods.

96:1.12 They were not universal-deity minded, and therefore these tribes continued to worship their tribal deities, including Yahweh and the silver and golden calves which symbolized the Bedouin herders’ concept of the spirit of the Sinai volcano.

Despite the efforts of Moses to elevate the tribal god Yahweh, his teachings were too far advanced for his people to comprehend and concepts of Yahweh remained somewhat primitive up until the time of captivity when the Hebrews were exposed to a loftier and purer conception of God as Ahura Mazda.

96:4.7 Moses made a heroic effort to uplift Yahweh to the dignity of a supreme Deity when he presented him as the “God of truth and without iniquity, just and right in all his ways.” And yet, despite this exalted teaching, the limited understanding of his followers made it necessary to speak of God as being in man’s image, as being subject to fits of anger, wrath, and severity, even that he was vengeful and easily influenced by man’s conduct.

96:4.8 Under the teachings of Moses this tribal nature god, Yahweh, became the Lord God of Israel, who followed them through the wilderness and even into exile, where he presently was conceived of as the God of all peoples. The later captivity that enslaved the Jews in Babylon finally liberated the evolving concept of Yahweh to assume the monotheistic role of the God of all nations.

Dr. Carter describes the early days of Yahweh:

In the earlier days, Yahveh was to Israel what Chemosh was to Ammon. He was the tribal God. He was the storm God. He was not the only existing God, but the exclusive God of Israel. This conception continued for centuries. The Hebrews could serve only Yahveh, to serve another God would be for them a wrong. This was henotheism. National misfortunes were regarded as tokens of Yahveh's displeasure. Success was a proof of divine favor. If therefore, the Hebrews were the one people of Yahveh, His glory was dependent on their national prosperity. He would surely vindicate Himself. Yahveh was served by ceremony and offering and little emphasis was put upon social and private morality. Idolatry continually menaced and marred the faith. While Yahveh continued the tribal God, the conception of Him became broader and nobler in the minds of many of the nation's leaders. . . . It is in the age of Deuteronomy and of the later writers that Yahveh's sole Godhead is emphasized. This conception as well as the movement toward universalism was aided by contact with the great empires. The exile purified to a large degree the popular half-heathen idea of Yahveh. . . . The post-exilic writers emphasize the attributes of Yahveh. The wisdom, omnipotence, holiness, justice, love, are frequently mentioned. The personal and spiritual relation between Yahveh and His people, between Yahveh and the individual worshipper are definitely and strongly represented. (George William Carter, Zoroastrianism and Judaism, The Gorham Press, Boston, 1918, pgs 47-49.)



#13 Bonita

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 11:18 AM

Having painted the picture of the primitive human interpretation of Yahweh, it is fair to note that Ahura Mazda was not without similar problems. Having originated as a nature god, once elevated to the One God, unfortunately carried evolutionary baggage with him that was passed onto Mithraism and eventually to Christianity.

98:5.3 This sun-god, or Sol Invictus, was a degeneration of the Ahura-Mazda deity concept of Zoroastrianism. Mithras was conceived as the surviving champion of the sun-god in his struggle with the god of darkness.

In the religion that developed, Ahura Mazda was compromised by the constant assault of the power of evil. His sovereignty was not complete until that future millennium when he would gain victory over evil and become supreme ruler. Because of this, Zoroastrian dualism is a positive dualism in that it offers a solution, in time, with the victory of Ahura Mazda. And of course, throughout the ages people have attempted to calculate the time when this mythical event will take place.

95:6.6 Zoroaster, like the Egyptians, taught the “day of judgment,” but he connected this event with the end of the world.

In the following quote, note how the ways in which Zoroastrianism influenced Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

If every religion have some note more dominating than the rest, dualism is the prominent factor in the religion of ancient Persia. . . . The dualism was an attempt to solve the problem of evil. Ahura Mazda or Ormazd makes what is good in the world, Angro Mainyu or Ahrinan mars it. The good god dwells in endless light, the evil deity in infinite darkness. . . . In the Gathas Ahura Mazda is God with Spenta Mainyu as his "Holy Spirit;" the Druj, "Lie, Falsehoood," is the devil, with Angro Mainyu as his "Evil spirit." In the opening of the Vendidad the action and counteraction of Ahura Mazda and of Angro Mainyu are described. The dualism dominates the cosmogony, the cultus, the entire view of the moral order of the world. Not only does Angro Mainyu spoil by his counter-creations all the good creations of Ahura Mazda, but he brings death to the world, seduces the first pair to sin, brings forth noxious animals and plants, and surrounds man by evil spirits. (George William Carter, Zoroastrianism and Judaism, The Gorham Press, Boston, 1918, pgs 51-52.)


Definitions:
Gathas- 17 poems attributed to Zoroaster that are the most ancient texts of the Avesta
Avesta- the sacred writings of Zoroastrianism, compiled in the 4th century AD
Vendidad- collection of texts within the Avesta containing the ecclesiastical code and an enumeration of evil spirits with ways to confound them.

#14 Bonita

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 09:19 AM

Now looking at how Zoroastrianism influenced Judaism and how the concept of Yahweh was expanded, taking on a richer content. This was not an easy task because of the exclusivity of Judaism, so there must have been enough of a similarity between the two creeds to create an attraction with minimal resistance. In addition, it is possible that the loftier concepts of Ahura Mazda were already latent qualities of Yahweh simply waiting for an opportunity for expression. Certainly, the prophets who arose during the exile give evidence of this readiness to change Yahweh from an angry god demanding appeasement to a more personal god of wisdom, holiness, justice and love. The anthropomorphic Yahweh was giving way to the Yahweh of pure spirit; albeit, a spirit with an exclusive covenant with the Jews.

But along with this more mature comprehension of Yahweh which the Hebrews absorbed from the Persian Ahura Mazda, there also came an exposure to the problem of evil. Up to this point Judaism had no philosophy to explain the presence of evil. They believed that Yahweh, who was supreme over both good and evil, looked with favor on the good and punished the evil; but, there was no explanation for the source of evil. The books of the Old Testament written during and after the period of exile reveal how Judaism struggled with this new concept.

After the exile the Jews awoke to a realization of the spiritual, antagonistic powers of evil, as they had not known them before. It is not unlikely that the author of Deutero-Isaiah may be rebuking Persian dualism in the words, quoted above, "I form the light and create darkness, " etc.. An instance in the development of these ideas may be indicated in the books of Samuel and Chronicles, the former compiled several centuries before the latter. In Samuel, Yahveh is angry with Israel and moves David to number them. In Chronicles, Satan "provoked David to number Israel." (The conception of Satan in Zechariah, Psalms and Job we probably may attribute to foreign influence.) He is represented as planning man's ruin, causing ills and disasters, and even exercising a sort of government. But the Jewish dualism is different from the Persian in this, that Yahveh is never eclipsed or held in subjection even for a time. He is always supreme. The work of Yahveh's creation, as it is told in the early allegorical parables of Genesis, may be marred by the presence of evil, but neither here nor elsewhere is Yahveh's power limited. He is always stronger than Satan and all the powers of evil. Yahveh, too, existed before the evil came into being. The Jewish dualism was not complete. (George William Carter, Zoroastrianism and Judaism, The Gorham Press, Boston, 1918, pgs 53-54.)


And neither were the original teachings of Zoroaster completely dualistic, but by the time of the Jewish exile, Zoroastrianism had adopted the concept of the equality of good and evil along with their respective gods.

95:6.5 Original Zoroastrianism was not a pure dualism; though the early teachings did picture evil as a time co-ordinate of goodness, it was definitely eternity-submerged in the ultimate reality of the good. Only in later times did the belief gain credence that good and evil contended on equal terms.

TUB has given us a remarkable revelation concerning the origin of evil but we must not forget about the evolution of the concept of good vs. evil because its discovery, long, long ago, was one of the most momentous events in the evolution of religion on this planet. It's discovery allowed for the idea that gods can be "all good" or "all evil", with the "all good" god finally emerging as the victor. Evolutionary religion still awaits this victory; revelatory religion realizes that it has already happened; and true religion knows that it never really existed in the first place.

87:4.5 When the doctrine of good and bad spirits finally matured, it became the most widespread and persistent of all religious beliefs. This dualism represented a great religio-philosophic advance because it enabled man to account for both good luck and bad luck while at the same time believing in supermortal beings who were to some extent consistent in their behavior. The spirits could be counted on to be either good or bad; they were not thought of as being completely temperamental as the early ghosts of the monospiritism of most primitive religions had been conceived to be. Man was at last able to conceive of supermortal forces that were consistent in behavior, and this was one of the most momentous discoveries of truth in the entire history of the evolution of religion and in the expansion of human philosophy.

#15 Raymond

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 11:41 AM

I've thouroughly enjoyed being refreshed on this topic and for having been given great insights especially as to its continuing survival.

#16 JR Sherrod

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:18 PM

This might be a silly aside, I'll admit, but I have to.

Zoroastrianism is a fascinating word! It includes the root of Zoroaster's name, and also a portion that includes "astria," which causes me to think of "astral."

as·tral [ástrəl]
adj
1. relating to stars: relating to, characteristic of, or consisting of stars
2. above material world: in theosophical belief, belonging to the ethereal region that is believed to exist throughout and at a higher level than the material world, in which personal auras are said to be perceived
3. exalted: likened to stars, for example, in height or distance from ordinary places or people; the astral position of king or president

[Early 17th century. Via late Latin astralis from, ultimately, Greek astron “star,” from astēr (see aster).]
-as·tral·ly, adv
Encarta ® World English Dictionary © & (P) 1998-2004 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.t


I have always been keenly interested in space, stars & star travel, and higher planes of thought and existence. Some of these topical areas certainly are represented within the Zoroastrianism you have been illuminating; as they are also well-represented in the teachings of The Urantia Book. As Spock would say, fascinating!

Edited by JR Sherrod, 07 December 2012 - 01:19 PM.

Ah! To be host to God, Himself; and to be enriched beyond measure by that incomprehensible treasure!

#17 Bonita

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 09:29 AM

Thanks gentlemen. I'll get back to this soon. I've been extremely busy with living. It takes a good hour or more to write one of these posts. I'm glad to know that someone is getting something out of the effort though.

#18 Bonita

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:04 AM

95:6.5 Zoroastrianism is the only Urantian creed that perpetuates the Dalamatian and Edenic teachings about the Seven Master Spirits. While failing to evolve the Trinity concept, it did in a certain way approach that of God the Sevenfold.

One of the cosmological features of Zoroastrianism is the Amesha Spenta, which is Ahura Mazda and a company of six deities (the Amshaspands), each with their own jurisdiction, much like the Seven Master Spirits.

The Amesha Spenta (George William Carter, Zoroastrianism and Judaism, The Gorham Press, Boston, 1918, pg56.)
  • Ahura Mazda- father and creator
  • Vohu-Manu- good thought
  • Asha-Vahista- righteousness
  • Khshathra-vairya-material sovereignty
  • Spenta-Annaiti- wisdom in piety
  • Haurvatat- health
  • Ameretat- immortality

The above are considered the Immortal Holy Ones and the seven-fold group constitutes a celestial council. Each entity sits upon a throne of gold, has his/her own sphere, a specific character and ministry. Also, each has a specific month, flower, emblem and holy day assigned to them. Although there is a huge overlap of evolutionary religion placed upon the original concept of Master Spirits, one can draw a few similarities.

The Seven Master Spirits each have their own sphere and superuniverse; they are diverse in nature, each with their own endowments and responsibilities. Rather than reproduce all the information here, I urge you to review Paper 16 Section 3 where each Master Spirit is described.

Edited by Bonita, 14 December 2012 - 07:35 PM.


#19 JR Sherrod

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 01:04 PM

95:6.5 Zoroastrianism is the only Urantian creed that perpetuates the Dalamatian and Edenic teachings about the Seven Master Spirits. While failing to evolve the Trinity concept, it did in a certain way approach that of God the Sevenfold.

The above are considered the Immortal Holy Ones and the seven-fold group constitutes a celestial council. Each entity sits upon a throne of gold, has his/her own sphere, a specific character and ministry. Also, each has a specific month, flower, emblem and holy day assigned to them. Although there is a huge overlap of evolutionary religion placed upon the original concept of Master Spirits, one can draw a few similarities.

The Seven Master Spirits each have their own sphere and superuniverse; they are diverse in nature, each with their own endowments and responsibilities. Rather than reproduce all the information here, I urge you to review Paper 16 Section 3 where each Master Spirit is described.


Okay Bonita, I will hit that Paper again. I am pleased to discover (through your scholarly presentations) that there are solid indications of Heavenly Father's bounty of truth ever-deeper into the most recent periods of human history. Fumbling around in the darkness arising from dual disasters of rebellion and error sure makes our tasks seem tough. I know we will eventually have the grand sweep of both human and celestial history available to all people; just as I hope our children's children will one day be taught in schools about the whole of our 1 million year struggles to rise from animal to human to ascending pilgrim.

Thanks for your hard work, Bonita, I really appreciate it!
Ah! To be host to God, Himself; and to be enriched beyond measure by that incomprehensible treasure!

#20 Bonita

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 08:38 AM

You're welcome JR.

I got to thinking about the Amesha Spenta and wondered if it was at the root of the belief in chakras. They're similar.




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